: powder paint colors after curing on two tone jigs


ksgoosekillr
02-08-2012, 08:32 AM
i have been doing a lot of two tone painting lately. I'm starting to notice something and I'm hoping some other users here will have some good input on this. When doing two tone jigs ill use my last pour as an example, it was a a white undercoat, a chart yellow base with hot pink on the top and orange on the bottom. You can see the pics below... well this is before the curing. After i cured the jigs the hot pink on the top turned into orange. well more of a hot pink fade to orange. My question is what colors have you guys had change on you during curing? I just made a bunch of jigs the way i wanted them only to have them change on me.

JusJign
02-08-2012, 10:26 AM
You might try backing off the temp in you're curing oven, you might also try using a thermometer rather then what the dials says the temp is. It is very likely the top coat is blending with the base coat on a minuscule level, due to high heat putting the coating in an almost slurry like state, enabling the colors to blend a little, forming an off, or slightly different color. Another possibility is, some pigments are not as robust as others, and if by chance your cure heat is to high, our your cure time is too long you can simply be over curing them.

Best Regards,
Randy Gaines

bigb027
02-08-2012, 11:28 AM
I had that same problem with the same colors. I'm thinking they just don't work together like some people said in the HG jig thread. :cheers:

defish
02-08-2012, 12:26 PM
i have been doing a lot of two tone painting lately. I'm starting to notice something and I'm hoping some other users here will have some good input on this. When doing two tone jigs ill use my last pour as an example, it was a a white undercoat, a chart yellow base with hot pink on the top and orange on the bottom. You can see the pics below... well this is before the curing. After i cured the jigs the hot pink on the top turned into orange. well more of a hot pink fade to orange. My question is what colors have you guys had change on you during curing? I just made a bunch of jigs the way i wanted them only to have them change on me.

There are a couple of ways you can get this color combination to work with powder paint.

1. Do the white base coat, dip the top and bottom colors, and then use a paint brush to tap the chartruese on to the middle band.

2. Do the colors the way you have been, but after applying the pink heat the jig just enough for the pink to get "glossy" (a heat gun would be the easiest way to do it.) Apply an epoxy like Devcon 2 Ton 30 minute epoxy to protect the paint instead of curing it.

I kind of like the 1st way myself because you get somewhat more "natural" transitions from one color to the other, and you don't have to do the epoxy top coat.

Good luck!

Dan

Seaark1660
02-08-2012, 02:04 PM
When I do the base coat,I fully cure it before doing any top coats.So the 2-tone colors will get a total of 3 bakes.I found this minimizes the color bleeding and excessive dripping.

I still like to spray paint for the 2-tones.And then use the clear for a final coat,that also gets a final cure.

On a side note;has anyone ever used the powder paint from Harbor Freight?

SaugerSlayer
02-08-2012, 02:33 PM
anymore i dont cure my powder paint. i kinda like that 2 ton clear epoxy. its tough as nails and puts a nice gloss on it. i also thought about adding glitter to the epoxy for a nice finish.

defish
02-08-2012, 02:39 PM
When I do the base coat,I fully cure it before doing any top coats.So the 2-tone colors will get a total of 3 bakes.I found this minimizes the color bleeding and excessive dripping.

I still like to spray paint for the 2-tones.And then use the clear for a final coat,that also gets a final cure.

On a side note;has anyone ever used the powder paint from Harbor Freight?


Seaark I'm curious what are you using for your clear coat after you spray your two-tones?

As to the Harbor Freight powder, I've heard that it's "ok." Not bad, but maybe not the best and very limited for colors. Some of the best quality powder at very good prices is available from ColumbiaCoatings.com. A lot of colors available and good customer service.

Dan

ksgoosekillr
02-08-2012, 02:50 PM
When I do the base coat,I fully cure it before doing any top coats.So the 2-tone colors will get a total of 3 bakes.I found this minimizes the color bleeding and excessive dripping.

I still like to spray paint for the 2-tones.And then use the clear for a final coat,that also gets a final cure.

On a side note;has anyone ever used the powder paint from Harbor Freight?

when you bake the second and third time doesn't the base coat soften up on you? i actually use the toaster over to heat the jigs for coloring that way i can heat the entire batch, and grab a jig at a time out of the oven to color... hang them on an outside rack.. when all have been colored back into the oven they go to cure.

defish
02-08-2012, 04:03 PM
when you bake the second and third time doesn't the base coat soften up on you? i actually use the toaster over to heat the jigs for coloring that way i can heat the entire batch, and grab a jig at a time out of the oven to color... hang them on an outside rack.. when all have been colored back into the oven they go to cure.

I also use mostly an oven for heating my jigs - including the multi colored ones. I don't fully cure them until ALL the paint has been applied. Your lures also shouldn't have any dripping or paint running unless they have WAY too much paint on them.

Try the methods I outlined on a previous post. Work with your oven temp and how long you preheat the lures - the lures should have a light coating and a glossy finish when they are removed from the powder.

Good luck.

Dan

P.S. I also keep notes for temps, heating times between coats, etc. for later reference.

drbrand
02-08-2012, 04:07 PM
If you want a source for inexpensive surplus powder paint, try this sight. There is no minimum amount you have to buy. You can buy a pound for $2-$3.

Once you go to the sight, click on inventory catalog and then at the bottom of the catalog click on the different colors.
http://www.powdercoatings.com/

Seaark1660
02-08-2012, 05:45 PM
Seaark I'm curious what are you using for your clear coat after you spray your two-tones?

As to the Harbor Freight powder, I've heard that it's "ok." Not bad, but maybe not the best and very limited for colors. Some of the best quality powder at very good prices is available from ColumbiaCoatings.com. A lot of colors available and good customer service.

Dan

I am using the Pro-Tec clear.I do like the Pro-Tec,but not the retail price.

I am still experimenting with different techniques,but when I go at it,I do a lot of them.It is no biggie to cure each coat though.I heat the jigs with a heat gun,may try the toaster oven to preheat.

The Pro-Tec clear works good to seal 2-tones,I spray the backs with a rattle-can.Makes it much more durable.

Seaark1660
02-08-2012, 06:01 PM
when you bake the second and third time doesn't the base coat soften up on you? i actually use the toaster over to heat the jigs for coloring that way i can heat the entire batch, and grab a jig at a time out of the oven to color... hang them on an outside rack.. when all have been colored back into the oven they go to cure.

Actually the baked primer coat is very hard,and does not soften much.The few small drips I get at first,I just hit it with a file.I tried glow orange over uncured white,and it kinda bled together.Much better after curing top coat first.

Seaark1660
02-08-2012, 06:16 PM
2-tone using spray cans.Base coat is pearl.Finish coat is clear Pro-tec.

maddogg
02-08-2012, 06:33 PM
ksgoosekillr,

Those are nice looking jigs. I also use the powder coating for jigs. How do you get the coating off of the jig eyes once its baked on?

Maddogg

Pikeslayer8
02-08-2012, 09:28 PM
2-tone using spray cans.Base coat is pearl.Finish coat is clear Pro-tec.

Those look very professional. Nicely done. :thumbsup:

walleyehunter92
02-08-2012, 10:27 PM
ksgoosekillr,

Those are nice looking jigs. I also use the powder coating for jigs. How do you get the coating off of the jig eyes once its baked on?

Maddogg

it can be very hard to get the paint out after its already baked on. that's why i usually make sure all the eyes are clear and useable before i bake them in the oven.

and you guys that put a primer on before coating the jigs with color, do you find that the primer gives you better colors? i was just wondering since i have never applied primer to my jigs and they always seem to turn out good.

defish
02-09-2012, 08:02 AM
it can be very hard to get the paint out after its already baked on. that's why i usually make sure all the eyes are clear and useable before i bake them in the oven.

and you guys that put a primer on before coating the jigs with color, do you find that the primer gives you better colors? i was just wondering since i have never applied primer to my jigs and they always seem to turn out good.

I hardly ever put a "primer" coat on my jigs either.

Some people say the colors are brighter if you do, but I don't see any difference. I dunk my jigs directly in the powder, but people using a fluid bed can have a thin enough coating with some colors that the lead shows through and the color isn't as bright. (Some powder colors are less dense than others and float out very thin in a fluid bed.)

Dan

ksgoosekillr
02-09-2012, 08:13 AM
that batch i tried the white as an undercoat... this next batch i am going to just do the green chart and cure it first. As you can see below my oven is packed!!!! those little ovens will hold about 150 jigs lol... Tonight im gonna fire it up again and see how easy it is to two tone them after the base coat is cured. Gonna try a blue/red on the green and pink/green, and maybe a few other combos...

2XL
02-09-2012, 09:43 AM
The only problems I have had with colors bleeding through or changing colors on two tones is when I applied a candy purple over a hologram glitter base coat. I was shooting at having the glitter show trough the candy coating and it did as long as I didn't apply too much purple. The problem ( if you could call it that) on two tone PCC/HG was that after curing, the purple overcoat would shrink a bit. By that I mean before curing the jig would be painted half and half but after curing the purple candy coat would have drawn back and only covered about a third to a quarter of the jig. It seems applying more PCC cures the problem but it also dampens the glitter affect I am looking for.

I have not painted a lot of different two tone colors before but the ones I have (save the candy coated ones) I have had no problems at all with color bleeding etc.

I do not put a base coat of white on and I do not cure two or three toned jigs one color at a time = I paint them one at a time then cure them when I have the number of jigs I want.

I am relatively new to the glitter powder paints and one thing I noticed is they do not take the heat of curing too well = the glitter melts. One soloution I read about was to bake the glitter powder paint at a lower temp for a longer period of time. 250 for 20-25 mins vs 350 for 15 mins for regular colors. I have not tried that but it makes sense. On the other hand, I found (by accident) that the glitter powder paint jigs placed further from the heating element (baking them at 350) that the glitter does not melt or at least it has not with the ones I have done.

IMO The candy colors are a little different. I like the finish and all but they don't seem to be as durable as the regular colos = they seem to chip a lot easier. This is with the candy colors being painted over plain lead and/or a base color for two tones. I have also noticed with the candy coatings that a little paint goes a long ways. I have noticed when I dip them (candy colors) as I would a regular color that many times I will end up with drips when curing them. It's not the end of the world bad or anything but something to keep in mind when using them. Seems there will be a little bit of a learing curve for me using the candy colors.

Sorry to the OP for straying off topic a little.

2XL
02-09-2012, 09:55 AM
2-tone using spray cans.Base coat is pearl.Finish coat is clear Pro-tec.

By spray cans do you mean regular spray paint or somthing else? If it's regular spray paint how does it hold up when applying the powder over coat and curing process? Do you notice any chipping poblems with the clear coat when fishing jigs painted this way?

Sorry for the Qs but spray painting opens a whole new door as to what a guy couold whip up color wise.

Awesome looking jigs BTW!

JJ Scully
02-09-2012, 11:37 AM
ksgoosekillr,

Those are nice looking jigs. I also use the powder coating for jigs. How do you get the coating off of the jig eyes once its baked on?

Maddogg

the best solution for paint in the eyes is to clear it out before you bake them. If you do have one get through I take a piece of fine wire and hold it with a pair of pliers heat it till red hot and push it through the hook eye. The size of wire depends on the eye of the hook. I use .031 stainless for making lures and it seems to do the trick in most of my jig hook eyes.

ksgoosekillr
02-09-2012, 10:30 PM
some new ideas

walleyehunter92
02-11-2012, 12:29 AM
Real Decent colors you got there ksgoosekillr:rockit:

walleyeweekend
02-11-2012, 06:55 AM
To get the paint off the eyes i use a fine wire wheel on bench grinder after curing. It gets all the paint off the eye.