: Heros?


Hawker
02-05-2004, 07:37 PM
I hope this is appropiate here. I just recieved this today, and if it is old hat or offensive, please forgive me. I was quite surprised to find this out, and then I was quite proud as well.


Heroes



A Tidbit of History

Captain Kangaroo died last week at 76 years of age, which is odd, because
he's never looked a day under 76. (DOB: 6/27/27)

But it reminded me of the following story.

Some people have been a bit offended that the actor, Lee Marvin, is buried
in a grave alongside 3 and 4 star generals at Arlington National Cemetery.

His marker gives his name, rank (PVT) and service (USMC). Nothing else.
Here's a guy who was only a famous movie star who served his time, why the
heck does he rate burial with these guys? Well, following is the amazing
answer: I always liked Lee Marvin, but did not know the extent of his Corps
experiences.

In a time when many Hollywood stars served their country in the armed forces
often in rear-echelon posts where they were carefully protected, only to be
trotted out to perform for the cameras in war bond promotions, Lee Marvin
was a genuine hero. He won the Navy Cross at Iwo Jima. There is only one
higher Naval award ... the Medal Of Honor.

If that is a surprising comment on the true character of the man, he credits
his sergeant with an even greater show of bravery.

Dialog from The Tonight Show with Johnny Carson: His guest was Lee Marvin.
Johnny said: "Lee, I'll bet a lot of people are unaware that you were a
Marine in the initial landing at Iwo Jima ... and that during the course of
that action you earned the Navy Cross and were severely wounded." "Yeah,
yeah... I got shot square in the #### and they gave me the Cross for securing
a hot spot about halfway up Suribachi...bad thing about getting shot up on a
mountain is guys gettin' shot hauling you down. But, Johnny, at Iwo I served
under the bravest man I ever knew... We both got the cross the same day, but
what he did for his Cross made mine look cheap in comparison. The dumb
#### actually stood up on Red beach and directed his troops to move
forward and get the #### off the beach. Bullets flying by and mortar rounds
landing every where and he stood there as the main target of gun fire so
that he could get his men to safety. He did this on more than one occasion
because his men's safety was more important than his own life. That Sergeant
and I have been lifelong friends. When they brought me off Suribachi we
passed the Sergeant and he lit a smoke and passed it to me, lying on my
belly on the litter and said, where'd they get you Lee?' "Well Bob ... if
you make it home before me, tell Mom to sell the outhouse!" Johnny, I'm not
lying...Sergeant Keeshan was the bravest man I ever knew..... The Sergeant's
name is Bob Keeshan... You and the world know him as "Captain Kangaroo."

On another note, there was this wimpy little man (who just passed away) on
PBS, gentle and quiet. Mr. Rogers is another of those you would least
suspect of being anything but what he now portrays to our youth. But Mr.
Rogers was a US Navy Seal, combat proven in Vietnam with over twenty-five
confirmed kills to his name.

He wore a long sleeve sweater on his show to cover the many tattoos on his
forearm and biceps. A master in small arms and hand-to-hand combat, able to
disarm or kill in a heartbeat.

After the war Mr. Rogers became an ordained Presbyterian minister and
therefore a pacifist. Vowing to never harm another human and also dedicating
the rest of his life to trying to help lead children on the right path in
life. He hid the tattoos and his past life away and won our hearts with his
quiet wit and charm.

America's real heroes don't flaunt what they did, they quietly go about
their day to day lives, doing what they do best. They earned our respect and
the freedoms that we all enjoy.

Look around and see if you can find one of those heroes in your midst.

Often, they are the ones you'd least suspect, but would most like to have on
your side if anything ever happened. Take the time to thank anyone that has
fought for our freedom. With encouragement they could be the next Lee
Marvin, Captain Kangaroo or Mr. Rogers.

Thank you fellow Vets, and thank you "Un-sung Heros" !!
Hawker

Hawker
02-05-2004, 07:37 PM
I hope this is appropiate here. I just recieved this today, and if it is old hat or offensive, please forgive me. I was quite surprised to find this out, and then I was quite proud as well.


Heroes



A Tidbit of History

Captain Kangaroo died last week at 76 years of age, which is odd, because
he's never looked a day under 76. (DOB: 6/27/27)

But it reminded me of the following story.

Some people have been a bit offended that the actor, Lee Marvin, is buried
in a grave alongside 3 and 4 star generals at Arlington National Cemetery.

His marker gives his name, rank (PVT) and service (USMC). Nothing else.
Here's a guy who was only a famous movie star who served his time, why the
heck does he rate burial with these guys? Well, following is the amazing
answer: I always liked Lee Marvin, but did not know the extent of his Corps
experiences.

In a time when many Hollywood stars served their country in the armed forces
often in rear-echelon posts where they were carefully protected, only to be
trotted out to perform for the cameras in war bond promotions, Lee Marvin
was a genuine hero. He won the Navy Cross at Iwo Jima. There is only one
higher Naval award ... the Medal Of Honor.

If that is a surprising comment on the true character of the man, he credits
his sergeant with an even greater show of bravery.

Dialog from The Tonight Show with Johnny Carson: His guest was Lee Marvin.
Johnny said: "Lee, I'll bet a lot of people are unaware that you were a
Marine in the initial landing at Iwo Jima ... and that during the course of
that action you earned the Navy Cross and were severely wounded." "Yeah,
yeah... I got shot square in the #### and they gave me the Cross for securing
a hot spot about halfway up Suribachi...bad thing about getting shot up on a
mountain is guys gettin' shot hauling you down. But, Johnny, at Iwo I served
under the bravest man I ever knew... We both got the cross the same day, but
what he did for his Cross made mine look cheap in comparison. The dumb
#### actually stood up on Red beach and directed his troops to move
forward and get the #### off the beach. Bullets flying by and mortar rounds
landing every where and he stood there as the main target of gun fire so
that he could get his men to safety. He did this on more than one occasion
because his men's safety was more important than his own life. That Sergeant
and I have been lifelong friends. When they brought me off Suribachi we
passed the Sergeant and he lit a smoke and passed it to me, lying on my
belly on the litter and said, where'd they get you Lee?' "Well Bob ... if
you make it home before me, tell Mom to sell the outhouse!" Johnny, I'm not
lying...Sergeant Keeshan was the bravest man I ever knew..... The Sergeant's
name is Bob Keeshan... You and the world know him as "Captain Kangaroo."

On another note, there was this wimpy little man (who just passed away) on
PBS, gentle and quiet. Mr. Rogers is another of those you would least
suspect of being anything but what he now portrays to our youth. But Mr.
Rogers was a US Navy Seal, combat proven in Vietnam with over twenty-five
confirmed kills to his name.

He wore a long sleeve sweater on his show to cover the many tattoos on his
forearm and biceps. A master in small arms and hand-to-hand combat, able to
disarm or kill in a heartbeat.

After the war Mr. Rogers became an ordained Presbyterian minister and
therefore a pacifist. Vowing to never harm another human and also dedicating
the rest of his life to trying to help lead children on the right path in
life. He hid the tattoos and his past life away and won our hearts with his
quiet wit and charm.

America's real heroes don't flaunt what they did, they quietly go about
their day to day lives, doing what they do best. They earned our respect and
the freedoms that we all enjoy.

Look around and see if you can find one of those heroes in your midst.

Often, they are the ones you'd least suspect, but would most like to have on
your side if anything ever happened. Take the time to thank anyone that has
fought for our freedom. With encouragement they could be the next Lee
Marvin, Captain Kangaroo or Mr. Rogers.

Thank you fellow Vets, and thank you "Un-sung Heros" !!
Hawker

Walleye Express
02-05-2004, 08:04 PM
[b]Hawker.

Be prepared for a post by a guy named Schnawzer who will verbally delete a portion of the facts you posted. He seems like a nice enough guy, but was the main suspect holding the thumb tack when your baloon suddenly busted at the circus. :D

Walleye Express
02-05-2004, 08:04 PM
[b]Hawker.

Be prepared for a post by a guy named Schnawzer who will verbally delete a portion of the facts you posted. He seems like a nice enough guy, but was the main suspect holding the thumb tack when your baloon suddenly busted at the circus. :D

hgmeyer
02-05-2004, 08:16 PM
Yeah... I'll beat him to it... The story isn't at all accurate... Lee Marvin was in the Marines... And, so was Bob Keeshan... But neither was at Iwo Jima... And, that is as far as it goes... The rest is "urban legend"...

From www.snopes.com (edited and shortened)

Lee Marvin did enlist in the U.S. Marines, saw action as Private First Class in the Pacific during World War II, and was wounded (in the buttocks) by fire which severed his sciatic nerve. However, this injury occurred during the battle for Saipan in June 1944, not the battle for Iwo Jima, which took place several months later, in February 1945. (Marvin also did receive a Purple Heart, and he is indeed buried at Arlington National Cemetery.)

Bob Keeshan, later famous as television's "Captain Kangaroo," also enlisted in the U.S. Marines, but too late to see any action during World War II. Keeshan was born on 27 June 1927 and enlisted two weeks before his 18th birthday, months too late to have taken part in the fighting at Iwo Jima. A 1997 interview with Keeshan noted that he "later enlisted in the U.S. Marines but saw no combat" because, as Keeshan said, he signed up "just before we dropped the atom bomb."

In 2003 someone thought to throw Mr. Rogers into the mix by adding...a bit to the existing e-mail about Lee Marvin and Bob Keeshan.

Numerous rumors about children's host Mr. Rogers having a violent or criminal past have been bandied about for years, but there is nothing to any of them. As our Mr. Rogers page explains, Fred Rogers never served in the military.

hgmeyer
02-05-2004, 08:16 PM
Yeah... I'll beat him to it... The story isn't at all accurate... Lee Marvin was in the Marines... And, so was Bob Keeshan... But neither was at Iwo Jima... And, that is as far as it goes... The rest is "urban legend"...

From www.snopes.com (edited and shortened)

Lee Marvin did enlist in the U.S. Marines, saw action as Private First Class in the Pacific during World War II, and was wounded (in the buttocks) by fire which severed his sciatic nerve. However, this injury occurred during the battle for Saipan in June 1944, not the battle for Iwo Jima, which took place several months later, in February 1945. (Marvin also did receive a Purple Heart, and he is indeed buried at Arlington National Cemetery.)

Bob Keeshan, later famous as television's "Captain Kangaroo," also enlisted in the U.S. Marines, but too late to see any action during World War II. Keeshan was born on 27 June 1927 and enlisted two weeks before his 18th birthday, months too late to have taken part in the fighting at Iwo Jima. A 1997 interview with Keeshan noted that he "later enlisted in the U.S. Marines but saw no combat" because, as Keeshan said, he signed up "just before we dropped the atom bomb."

In 2003 someone thought to throw Mr. Rogers into the mix by adding...a bit to the existing e-mail about Lee Marvin and Bob Keeshan.

Numerous rumors about children's host Mr. Rogers having a violent or criminal past have been bandied about for years, but there is nothing to any of them. As our Mr. Rogers page explains, Fred Rogers never served in the military.

Fenwick
02-05-2004, 08:18 PM
Yes, people never know who that Old Man walking down the street realy is or was. There are Many Heroes among us Thank God!
Some of them visit this board. Thank all who served or are now serving.
Fenwick 67-70

Fenwick
02-05-2004, 08:18 PM
Yes, people never know who that Old Man walking down the street realy is or was. There are Many Heroes among us Thank God!
Some of them visit this board. Thank all who served or are now serving.
Fenwick 67-70

Hawker
02-05-2004, 08:30 PM
One of the things I love about this site is that "someone" is always able to somehow dig out and seperate the "real" from the "imagined" and I truly do appreciate that from you guys. Oh well, it "read" good anyway! Thanks!!
Hawker

Hawker
02-05-2004, 08:30 PM
One of the things I love about this site is that "someone" is always able to somehow dig out and seperate the "real" from the "imagined" and I truly do appreciate that from you guys. Oh well, it "read" good anyway! Thanks!!
Hawker

The Democrat
02-06-2004, 01:21 AM
Most of Washington's good fishing is in eastern Washington, and to get there, I drive over the mountains on Interstate 90. The route takes me through a town called Cle Elum, which is the hometown and burial place of Douglas A. Munro, the only Coast Guardsman ever awarded the Medal of Honor.

Munro was a landing craft driver. At Guadalcanal, 500 Marines were trapped on a beach. Munro positioned his landing craft between the Marines and Japanese machine guns, shielding them from the enemy fire. All of the Marines were safely evacuated. Munro took a bullet in the head. His last words were, "Did everybody get off?"

I was working out of town when my mother-in-law died four years ago. My wife called, and I drove back to Seattle on I-90. Shortly after passing through Cle Elum, I passed a little old man in a beater pickup truck. He was in his eighties, wore thick glasses, and was hunched over the wheel. The truck was wearing Medal of Honor plates. There were 7 Medal of Honor recipients living in this state at the time, and I don't know which one he was.

I served in Vietnam with a man named Mitchell Stout. I didn't know him personally but he was in my unit. He lost his life saving four men from an enemy grenade. He is the only Army Air Defense artilleryman in American history to win the Medal of Honor, and one of two Tennesseans who won the MOH in Vietnam.

The Democrat
02-06-2004, 01:21 AM
Most of Washington's good fishing is in eastern Washington, and to get there, I drive over the mountains on Interstate 90. The route takes me through a town called Cle Elum, which is the hometown and burial place of Douglas A. Munro, the only Coast Guardsman ever awarded the Medal of Honor.

Munro was a landing craft driver. At Guadalcanal, 500 Marines were trapped on a beach. Munro positioned his landing craft between the Marines and Japanese machine guns, shielding them from the enemy fire. All of the Marines were safely evacuated. Munro took a bullet in the head. His last words were, "Did everybody get off?"

I was working out of town when my mother-in-law died four years ago. My wife called, and I drove back to Seattle on I-90. Shortly after passing through Cle Elum, I passed a little old man in a beater pickup truck. He was in his eighties, wore thick glasses, and was hunched over the wheel. The truck was wearing Medal of Honor plates. There were 7 Medal of Honor recipients living in this state at the time, and I don't know which one he was.

I served in Vietnam with a man named Mitchell Stout. I didn't know him personally but he was in my unit. He lost his life saving four men from an enemy grenade. He is the only Army Air Defense artilleryman in American history to win the Medal of Honor, and one of two Tennesseans who won the MOH in Vietnam.

Ivy
02-06-2004, 08:23 AM
With my new job transfer I am driving about 10 hours a week to come home on the weekends. With all this time in the car, I am catching up on my reading ( books on tape ).

I just finished "Medal of Honor" which are profiles of Medal of Honor receipients and Wild Blue by Stephen Ambrose.

Wild Blue talked about the men who flew the B-24's and what they went through. The book followed George McGovern from South Dakota. In my ignorance I just knew him as the Sen. that Nixon beat for President.

And while I don't agree with McGoverns politics ( this is not intended to be a political thread) I am in awe of the accomplishments and service he gave to his country during the war.

And point being, there are thousands upon thousands of stories just like his. Ordinary men who have done extra-oridinary things during times of complete terror and chaos.

These men are Heros and don't receive enough credit and respect from a Nation that would not be the Nation that it is today had it not been for their sacrifices. And in to many cases it was the ultimate sacrifice.

Ivy

Ivy
02-06-2004, 08:23 AM
With my new job transfer I am driving about 10 hours a week to come home on the weekends. With all this time in the car, I am catching up on my reading ( books on tape ).

I just finished "Medal of Honor" which are profiles of Medal of Honor receipients and Wild Blue by Stephen Ambrose.

Wild Blue talked about the men who flew the B-24's and what they went through. The book followed George McGovern from South Dakota. In my ignorance I just knew him as the Sen. that Nixon beat for President.

And while I don't agree with McGoverns politics ( this is not intended to be a political thread) I am in awe of the accomplishments and service he gave to his country during the war.

And point being, there are thousands upon thousands of stories just like his. Ordinary men who have done extra-oridinary things during times of complete terror and chaos.

These men are Heros and don't receive enough credit and respect from a Nation that would not be the Nation that it is today had it not been for their sacrifices. And in to many cases it was the ultimate sacrifice.

Ivy

The Democrat
02-06-2004, 09:24 AM
George McGovern is one of World War 2's greatest heroes. He commanded the 455th Squadron, whose B-24s destroyed most of Hitler's oil refining capacity. One noted historian credited the 455th with winning the war. Of course, many people made vital contributions, but the 455th's was way up there, on a par with the RAF's in the Battle of Britain. McGovern was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross and was nominated for a second DFC.

The Democrat
02-06-2004, 09:24 AM
George McGovern is one of World War 2's greatest heroes. He commanded the 455th Squadron, whose B-24s destroyed most of Hitler's oil refining capacity. One noted historian credited the 455th with winning the war. Of course, many people made vital contributions, but the 455th's was way up there, on a par with the RAF's in the Battle of Britain. McGovern was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross and was nominated for a second DFC.

tly
02-06-2004, 08:01 PM
Absolute reads are:
- FLAGS OF OUR FATHERS which is a detailed story of Iwo Jima
- FLYBOYS which is a story of an atroll heavily defended by the Japanese and often attacked.
There were 8 or so shot down there, only 1 survivor (GW Bush) who was rescued by sub
The book graphically describes the history of Samuri, Shinto and history of previous wars
and kind of actually defends some of the actions.
Both books are very well researched and include extensive interviews with both sides. The author
is the son of one of the flag raisers on Iwo Jima and did not know of his medals until after he
had died.

If you bleed red/white/blue these are very emotional books.
He has another called Winter Marines or something similar but it is a work of historical fiction
and does not compare with the others.

Good reading.

TLY

Rod Holder
02-06-2004, 10:54 PM
We in the Chicagoland area just had a WWII hero die. He had left Chicago in 1980 after two decades of work on WGN TV, as Oliver O. Oliver the clown on Bozo's Circus and by his name, Ray Rayner, as host of his morning kid's program. Only in his obit. did I learn that he had been a bomber pilot, got shot down over Germany, and spent two years as a POW. A whole lot of us who grew up watching kid's TV shows in the 60's and 70's mourn his recent passing.

Rod Holder
02-06-2004, 10:54 PM
We in the Chicagoland area just had a WWII hero die. He had left Chicago in 1980 after two decades of work on WGN TV, as Oliver O. Oliver the clown on Bozo's Circus and by his name, Ray Rayner, as host of his morning kid's program. Only in his obit. did I learn that he had been a bomber pilot, got shot down over Germany, and spent two years as a POW. A whole lot of us who grew up watching kid's TV shows in the 60's and 70's mourn his recent passing.

The Democrat
02-07-2004, 12:51 AM
Even among heroes a few rise above all others, and one of the towering giants of World War 2 annals is Henry "Red" Erwin.

http://www.homeofheroes.com/wings/erwin.html

PWSR91
02-08-2004, 07:29 AM
"Semper-Fi" 77-84
USMC
No hero by any means,but, did my J.O.B. and am proud of it!!

Phil Wilson Sr. #91

lobo1
02-09-2004, 03:58 AM
>Absolute reads are:
>- FLAGS OF OUR FATHERS which is a detailed story of Iwo Jima
>- FLYBOYS which is a story of an atroll heavily defended by
>the Japanese and often attacked.
> There were 8 or so shot down there, only 1 survivor (GW
>Bush) who was rescued by sub
> The book graphically describes the history of Samuri,
>Shinto and history of previous wars
> and kind of actually defends some of the actions.
>Both books are very well researched and include extensive
>interviews with both sides. The author
>is the son of one of the flag raisers on Iwo Jima and did not
>know of his medals until after he
>had died.
>
>If you bleed red/white/blue these are very emotional books.
>He has another called Winter Marines or something similar but
>it is a work of historical fiction
>and does not compare with the others.
>
>Good reading.
>
>TLY




TLY,

You are right on. These two books were just fantastic. Seems there must have been a few pages missing from my old history books, eh.

lobo1

Capt. Doug schreiber
02-09-2004, 07:24 AM
Read flags of our fathers, great book. It hit home for us being that my father in Law was a 17 when he joined the marine corp. He was on the third wave a shore on Iwo Jima. Just another kid from Milwaukee? I don't think so. They had a job to do and just wanted to get home to raise their families. He never talks about it. One of my clients , whos father also served in WWII said that we are losing 1500 WWII vet a day. We have so much to learn from them and soon they will be gone. Heros walk in our mist everyday and we don't even know it. We own them everything, especially our respect. GOD BLESS THEM ALL.
Doug

tly
02-09-2004, 07:41 PM
Anyone who was in service at that time is a hero, as are the Korean, Vietnam, Grenada or
wherever they are sent to serve.

My family had it's moments also:
Joe Younger, B17 shot down over Germany, dumped the crew in Switzerland and he lit in Germany and a stalag
Betty Younger, a nurse, joined the WACs, went to the Pacific
Harriet Younger, Also a nurse, wound up in Guam, marrying the US custodian and relocating to Mpls
Sally Younger, WAF unsure of what she actually did
Ed Younger (dad), flew the hump C46's than became an instructor at McCarrons, then many years
with the Wisc. Air Guard.

Me, I should have been a politician, I did not do military service, fell between everything.

I am sure proud everytime I see our flag.

TLY

dented boat guy
02-11-2004, 11:33 AM
Anybody you need when you have an emergency.

The Democrat
02-11-2004, 12:03 PM
Hey T thanks for the bumper sticker! I'm trying to decide which car I can afford to have vandalized when I drive through ... er ... opposition neighborhoods.

My dad's younger brother flew 17's in the Pacific, went MIA in '44. The family assumed he went down at sea and they would never learn his fate, but then hunters found the wreck in the early fifties. It was on a remote mountaintop in the Phillippines, which Uncle Paul apparently hit in bad weather. I was very young at the time but vaguely remember my parent's excitement when he was found. It was a very emotional time for them. There's a monument to his memory in the family plot in Wessington SD's cemetery, but the mingled bones of Paul and his crew members are buried in a mass grave in a national military cemetery in St. Louis.

As for gays in the military, I had an uncle who almost certainly was gay (his generation kept this sort of thing secret), who fought in Korea. He passed away this winter.