: Layer of film on morning coffee


swartos
09-29-2005, 09:53 AM
Hi,

Anybody else get this on there coffee? Kind of a gross looking film floating on the top of the coffee? Wish I could figure out whats causing it. I'm on Rural water....so not coming out of the ground.

Any ideas?

NOTHING
09-29-2005, 10:08 AM
GREASE! OR AN OIL THATS WHAT I HAVE BEEN TOLD.

Java Joe
09-29-2005, 10:44 AM
That is oil from the coffee beans. Nothing to worry about. Most of it is filtered out if you use paper filters. If you use a gold filter, you get more 'oil'.

Brazilian Bean
09-29-2005, 11:14 AM
I have the same thing.....and It's NOT from the beans. I buy folgers sealaroma coffee,...and every morning have a near metalic or shiny layer on the top of my mug.

If it was from the coffee beans.....you'd see a layer in every mug. I can go down to the coffee shop down town, or any restaurant and have a perfectly fine cup of joe.

MK
09-29-2005, 11:24 AM
My office coffee has this film if I use the tap water. The city water is very hard. Not an oily film but a scummy film that will come off if you put a napkin on it. Nasty.

No film if I use the water from the water cooler for the coffee. It can sit for hours with no film.

Same thing at home; softened water-no film, straight from the well- film if it sits in the pot for more than about 30 minutes.

JLDII
09-29-2005, 12:02 PM
It is oil from the beans.

The reason some people see it and others don't is the water temperature. The hotter the water, the more oil you see. This is true even after the coffee has been brewed. You might not have any in a fresh brewed pot, but after that pot sits on the warmer long enough, the temperature goes up, and the oil appears.

vizslaguy
09-29-2005, 12:35 PM
I was once told a couple of pennies between the pot and the burner will reduce the amount of film. Worth a shot?

Jack G
09-30-2005, 01:11 AM
I saw the same film on coffee at my favorite neighborhood restaurant every morning for many years. After the first slurp it disappeared. Wonder where it went? The coffee tasted fine.

Other restaurants in the same area, in the same water district, and my home in the same area, did not have this film on their coffee.

Jack

MapnSD
09-30-2005, 06:19 AM
Swartos
Try putting a tablespoon of lemon juice in your water before heating the water. Then try using the brown filters.
I beleive the film is calcium carbonate that is released when the water is heated. The lemon juice will solve your problem.
Make a pot and let us know.

I found this film in Iowa and the acid in the lemon juice solved the problem.

Mapnsd

bobwhy
09-30-2005, 06:55 AM
But what does the lemon juice do to the taste of the coffee?
Bob Y. WBSA Member
Of all the liars among mankind, the fisherman is the most trustworthy.
- William Sherwood Fox

Fish_on
09-30-2005, 07:23 AM
Dude you're drooling.

COFFEEXPERT
09-30-2005, 07:47 AM
YOU GUYS ARE FUNNY...LEMON JUICE, PENNIES, WATER TEMP.... HEHE
The only thing that causes film of this type on the surface is water quality. try brewing your coffee for just one day with bottled water.
you will not have a film. this is all about the water you use or the way your water is filtered or treated. end of speculation... water temp was a good one though JD.

New One
09-30-2005, 08:42 AM
Light reflecting off of Venus, that passes through swamp gas causes this filmy appearance on top of a cup of joe in the mornings. Nothing to worry about.

rspahr
09-30-2005, 08:22 PM
http://www.cafecognito.ca/coffee.htm

Look under dark roasts. I am not sure whether to believe this or not?:)

tbomn
09-30-2005, 08:54 PM
I think it has more to do with the type of beans. A good quality dark roast will have the oil on the top. I like it hot, dark, and greeeeasy. That's coffee.....none of that warm brown water.:shame:

Raybob
10-01-2005, 10:45 AM
Oil ~ Maybe it is a additive that GW ask the coffee makers to add to irritate "The Democrat", so that he can start the day out on his left foot instead of on the right foot! :)

rspahr
10-01-2005, 12:10 PM
Heh heh heh. Coffee with an oil slick. Now that sounds appetizing:)

bigfish1965
10-01-2005, 09:55 PM
I use a Carafe style brewer and have no problems...
Have you guys ever tried Jamaican Blue Mountain coffee??
Hard as #### to find and expensive (except in Jamaica) but absolutely amazing coffee. Has won the top coffee award for several years running...wish I could remember where I read that...but DAMM the stuff is good.

rspahr
10-02-2005, 03:30 PM
I never tried it. I don't think I have seen it in the stores. I have tried Kona when I was in Kona though. I thought it was rather good.

JLDII
10-02-2005, 04:55 PM
I get a pound or two of Blue Mountain every year from a friend of mine who travels to Jamaica several times a year. It is IMHO the best coffee in the world.

Hollis ULed
10-02-2005, 06:38 PM
I used to get coffee from the foreign ship's captain when I had a job inspecting ships. It had a LAYER od thick oil on it,..my boss said to drink it to not offend the captain (lots of posturing in this job) I was told it was the oil from the beans and you got a lot more of it from the foreign captains was that they steamed the beans to "brew" coffee. I also understand that some coffee makers operate to cause a bit higher heat (so maybe the difference) Also if you do this AND have hard water the mag and ca. salts will combine with the oils (a bit like making soap).

maxxey
04-07-2014, 01:57 PM
I have a terrible film (almost like a metalic/shiney oil slick) on top my coffee. I bought bottled water and it dissapeared. I then ran our water through a carbon filter and the slick dissappeared. We are having an inline carbon filter installed on our kitchen water line to get rid of this problem. My water man said it is plant debree in the well water. It is not harmful but not nice to look at. It is called Tannins. Hope this helps.

yarcraft91
04-07-2014, 04:52 PM
But what does the lemon juice do to the taste of the coffee?
Bob Y. WBSA Member
Of all the liars among mankind, the fisherman is the most trustworthy.
- William Sherwood Fox

Ever had espresso in Italy? It's served with a twist of lemon. You rub the lemon rind on the rim of the cup to add flavor.

ffishman
04-07-2014, 05:24 PM
"Black Gold", Jed Clamppett got rich on it.

LLewellin
04-07-2014, 06:44 PM
I use a Carafe style brewer and have no problems...
Have you guys ever tried Jamaican Blue Mountain coffee??
Hard as #### to find and expensive (except in Jamaica) but absolutely amazing coffee. Has won the top coffee award for several years running...wish I could remember where I read that...but DAMM the stuff is good.

Is that the coffee made from monkey poo!LOL(Movie Bucket List)

I have heard it is very good coffee but have yet to try it.

troutaholic
04-08-2014, 10:51 AM
This is a very interesting topic. The first thing one must recognize is that the film is hydrophobic substance. Not unlike vegetable oil in water, it is a substance that does not mix stably with water. Of course, there are always work-a-rounds high pressure and high heat are two example of how to “mix” two unlike materials together. In the case of coffee, this oil is from the bean itself. Hydrophobic molecules related to oils are major ingredients of cell membranes (think plants – vegetables and coffee beans).
So why are there so many differences between one pot to another; one restaurant to another; one brand from another……
Quite simply, there are too many unknown variables:
1) Amount time from being roasted
2) Time from being ground
3) Location of where the beans are harvested
4) Length of time of being roasted
5) Heat of water used to brew the coffee
6) Quantity of coffee used to brew
7) Brewing technique
8) Additives (think of water quality)
9) Etc
# 8 relates to many of the variables described in the numerous threads above. Think of the lemon juice solution. Lemon juice is a hydrophilic material that loves to combine with water. Not unlike detergent used to clean dishes, the lemon juice will break down the water resistance of the hydrophobic materials. The more elements in the water(such as chlorine, iron, lemon juice, calcium, etc) the less oil will appear. I have never brewed with distilled water, but I am guessing that will provide more of a “oil slick” than tap water. Reverse Osmosis water should also provide the slick.

Based on the recent data of the positive qualities of coffee, just sit back and enjoy a cup of joe. That oil is better for you than you think!!!!

Just Me
04-08-2014, 11:00 AM
I have come to the conclusion that we have found a post from Sept 2005, to comment on. And we need open water soon...LOL

My mother always said some coffee just was plain bad....

I like Egg coffee myself..

zeebee
04-09-2014, 10:19 PM
Years ago I discovered the best coffee is steamed brewed. Get a good coffee system, its more important than the bean. Drip brew is just bad coffee. My Saeco unit has brewed over 10,000 cups and is still going strong. Med roast unless your makin espresso then its the darker beans.