: Age of a 24 inch walleye?


Texeye
05-28-2007, 09:56 AM
I tried the search but no results...Do any of you have a web sight or information on the age of different lengths of walleye?

I saw it on here once, but can't seem to find it again. In trying to get some of our local fishermen to release some of the bigger walleye every once in a while I thought the age of these 22 to 26 inch walleye might be a little more incentive???

Thanks,
Texeye

karpbuster
05-28-2007, 11:42 AM
It depends on food, water conditions, length of season...man I read how they tell exactly there is a page on scales and spines, etc. LOL

I looked at fish farms they usually have to tell you for harvest purposes:

http://www.sprucecreekfish.com/walleye-fish-farm.htm

Based on this 6" first year and so on, 1# per year, a largemouth is 1 to 1.5 # a year growth. I think Mexico told me that the 27" walleye I caught at Ute was 7-8 years old. I don't know how he knew that, sounded good to me. Maybe he could tell us how he figured that? :)

So it sounds like 6" a year, but it is not definite on there or any where I could find, so 4 years old about.

karpbuster

retire55
05-28-2007, 03:34 PM
As already stated, many factors influence walleye growth rates.

A report based on Fall Walleye Index Netting studies from 1989 to 1999 in a North Western Quebec shield lake indicates that a 21.7 inch female walleye would have an average age of 9 years. The same publication reported that a 25 inch female walleye would have an average age of 17 years.

Juls
05-28-2007, 03:39 PM
You would need to check the Otolith (fish's eardrum) and count the rings (like in a cut section of a tree trunk) to get the precise age of your fish in question.

Here's an online manual that shows you how to do it. Of course you would need some sort of fancy machine to cut a section of the otolith in order to read it under a microscope. ???
http://www.cbl.umces.edu/~secor/otolith-manual.html

That 24 incher should be over 10 years old though...I think?

Juls

Texeye
05-28-2007, 05:48 PM
Thanks. ya'll.

It puts a whole new perspective on keeping some of the best spawning size fish in the lake,when you think how long it took for some of those fish to attain that size. Even the 20 inchers have been around a while.

Have a good one...and thanks to all the men and women who have served, or are serving as protectors of this great country.
Texeye

ETT
05-28-2007, 06:07 PM
Here's a link to an article w/ info from Travis Hartman, that is based on Otolith bone studies.
http://www.toledoblade.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050828/COLUMNIST22/508280312
In it is stated that a 22" walleye may be from 4 to 19 years old.
Travis's handle is "real science" search his name for more info.

Walleye mikey
05-28-2007, 07:26 PM
Around our area (Lk.St. Clair, Detroit river....)it would be 5-7 years old. Right now we have 4 year olds ranging from 18-20". Growth per year slows once they get to around 20". 30"ers are 10 or more years old.

Juls
05-28-2007, 09:06 PM
Hey Tex,
I found this...You will need to go to the Ohio Seagrant site to get the results. I can't copy it here for some reason or another.

It's only regarding Erie fish, but you'll get the idea. It's a .pdf file that Travis Hartman put together using data collected from Otolith samples from previous year classes.

http://ohioseagrant.osu.edu/discuss/index.php?topic=809.0

I'm not sure, but you might need to register on that site to read anything on the dicussion board. Or, it might be that you would need to register only if you are wanting to start a post or reply to a post. :confused:

Either way, the link above takes you to that particular discussion, and you'll find the .pdf link in that thread.

Juls

Texeye
05-28-2007, 10:59 PM
Thanks, Juls.

I copied that table. I am surprised to find how long some of these fish live. Some up to 20+ years. In the thread ETT listed, and as the tables show, there is a pretty wide discrepency between males and females, as far as how fast they grow.

The table for Erie lists the average for male and female. It looks like they grow fairly fast the first five or six years then seem to taper off a little.Those last six to eight inches take a little longer.

I suppose our southern walleye would be about the same. If you consider the stress of hot summers. I am guessing from this info. that a 20 inch walleye would be about six or seven years old on the average and could be up to ten years old. A 25 incher is probably around ten years old.

Interesting stuff.
Thanks all.
Texeye

Texeye
05-28-2007, 10:59 PM
Thanks, Juls.

I copied that table. I am surprised to find how long some of these fish live. Some up to 20+ years. In the thread ETT listed, and as the tables show, there is a pretty wide discrepency between males and females, as far as how fast they grow.

The table for Erie lists the average for male and female. It looks like they grow fairly fast the first five or six years then seem to taper off a little.Those last six to eight inches take a little longer.

I suppose our southern walleye would be about the same. If you consider the stress of hot summers. I am guessing from this info. that a 20 inch walleye would be about six or seven years old on the average and could be up to ten years old. A 25 incher is probably around ten years old.

Interesting stuff.
Thanks all.
Texeye

karpbuster
05-29-2007, 12:00 PM
Man, when a fish is older than my kids I am letting it go!

So basically it is...who knows? The potential for a fish to be really old at that size makes you think.

I believe crappie have a life span of 5-6 years, so eat those buggers or brauts! ;)

karpbuster

knowlwdge is power
05-29-2007, 05:34 PM
You didn't search very hard. Try: >growth rate for walleye<

Growth rates vary substantially from north to south. Life expectancy varies substantially from north to south.

You mention the stress of the hot summers but fail to account for the warmer winter temperatures.

Do your lakes have natural reproduction? ie: are breeders needed? The older the fish gets, the shorter it's life expectancy. Therefore, it will be around to contribute to the spawn for a shorter period of time. What's better, harvest momma with lots of eggs for a few more yrs or harvest a couple of babies (same amt of meat) that will potentially contribute eggs (same genetics) much longer?

The older the fish gets, the less likely it is to be harvested because it won't be around to be caught when it eventually dies of natural causes. If it's a put and take fishery an un-caught fish that died of old age was a wasted resource.

I not suggesting what is appropriate or biologically correct but IMO, it kinda seems your selecting only information that supports your personal opinion.

Though it might make you feel good, convincing your circle of friends to conform to your point of view is probably biologically insignificant. If you really care, contact your DNR and ask what their management strategy is. Then ask why they don't manage things the way you think they should. If there is enough public interest in your way, maybe they will change the existing management plan to provide a trophy fishery.

Good Luck

>>>>>>>>
Also, many bodies of water would see substantially better (more meat per trip) crappie fishing if less young fish were harvested. Based on the average age of harvest, there's plenty of time to introduce them to a skillet even if allowed to grow up but that's another topic.

Auggie264
05-29-2007, 05:47 PM
Another way to age walleyes is to take a scale and count the rings like the otiliths or tree rings. However the scales have hundreds of rings. The scales do grow yearly and by looking at the scale you will see rings closer to each other or darker than others. Those differences are the years. Be sure not to get a scale from the lateral line since they don't look like a typical scale and are usually darker, making it more difficult to age.

Nightie
05-29-2007, 06:43 PM
It takes 4-5 years for a walleye to reach 16' in Minnesota.

Finger lings are 4-6' LONG---1--GROWING SEASON

You look at Mn. DNR suggested best sized walleye for taking is only 14"s

Good spawners or good eaters for old 29"s.

People from Leech Lake fought the DNR and the people won!!!

Texeye
05-29-2007, 11:21 PM
Yeah your right. There are so many variables involved there is no real answer. And when you mention anything like this to guys who take double limits and cull all day for 20 plus inchers. They don't listen anyway. What was I thinking?? :banghead:

Have a good one.
Texeye

CarpetBagger
05-30-2007, 10:22 AM
We got the 03 fish in Lake Erie 17-19in long....3 years old...they eat good year round...What a fishery!

CB
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