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  #71  
Old 02-01-2017, 04:12 PM
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drbrand drbrand is offline
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When you are loading your boat in high winds, forget about backing your trailer parallel to the dock. Back your trailer into the direction of the wind as much as you can. It will help to eliminate the difficulty of crosswind crabbing your way onto the trailer and could keep you from beating your boat up against the dock. And if you are crabbing in crosswinds and mistime hitting the bunks, you can come crashing down onto the trailer fenders.
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  #72  
Old 02-08-2017, 09:57 AM
SHOTGUN RUSS SHOTGUN RUSS is offline
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Next question: When in the thick of nasty conditions when the pucker factor is close to 100% who takes the time to adjust/run trim tabs if you have them? I have read a lot of what they can do and what you could use them for in bad conditions, in reality are they actually used when conditions get really bad, or is this more theory vs reality?
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  #73  
Old 02-26-2017, 07:54 PM
FuzzyIL FuzzyIL is offline
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So much helpful and insightful posts. I am so impressed. Safety is paramount. Throttle is so important. So is horsepower.

I am.not gonna tell war stories of my experiences, but you need to expose your self to situations. These little walleye boats we have are very elusive of danger if you learn. Learning doesn't not mean to be dangerous. But sometimes danger creeps up and finds you. Always respect the weather. It will kill you.
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  #74  
Old 05-22-2017, 12:09 PM
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I get it now. On Thursday afternoon, I had my initiation into big water boat handling. I have been following this thread since it began, and have wondered how I would handle some of the conditions I saw described in various posts. I'm now thankful that I read this thread as it progressed. When reading of "three to five footers" in the past, I figured the authors were exaggerating a bit on the size of the waves. Watching You Tube videos, the water did not look that rough. But, what we ran into on Thursday afternoon gave the experience of three to fives (according to the small craft warning, that we probably should have taken more seriously) with the occasional larger roller (do the larger ones always come in twos?) mixed in.

This was our second excursion on Green Bay, and our first on Sturgeon Bay. From the launch, near the mouth of Sturgeon Bay, at the main waters of Green Bay, it didn't look too rough. We figured we'd be fine heading right into Sturgeon Bay, where it seemed to be pretty well protected. Soon, the following rollers were high enough that I was reminded of this thread, and kept in mind the peril of getting swamped from behind. The rollers were far enough apart, that we were able to plane out without getting pounded. Not at high speed, but enough to get us quickly to a spot where we could begin trolling for walleye, or whatever would bite. We fished for a couple of hours in the relatively calm waters of the narrower part of the bay.

With the wind picking up, we decided it was time to call it a day, and head back to the launch. We had not realized the extent to which the wave activity had increased. It was not a fast ride back, but we made it with only a few instances of spray hitting the windshield, and nothing at all gushing over the bow. I was relieved to see how well the boat handled the conditions. In mind constantly, was the advice to work the throttle constantly, increasing power to climb the fronts of the waves, and pulling back for the ride down, and repeating to get the bow raised and climb, and so on, and so forth. Before long, I felt confident that both the boat and I were getting it right, and would get the crew in mostly dry, and all the way alive and safe. For that, I appreciate all here who contributed to this thread. Thank you.
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  #75  
Old 05-22-2017, 03:19 PM
Scott C Scott C is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Waterboy12 View Post
I get it now. On Thursday afternoon, I had my initiation into big water boat handling. I have been following this thread since it began, and have wondered how I would handle some of the conditions I saw described in various posts. I'm now thankful that I read this thread as it progressed. When reading of "three to five footers" in the past, I figured the authors were exaggerating a bit on the size of the waves. Watching You Tube videos, the water did not look that rough. But, what we ran into on Thursday afternoon gave the experience of three to fives (according to the small craft warning, that we probably should have taken more seriously) with the occasional larger roller (do the larger ones always come in twos?) mixed in.

This was our second excursion on Green Bay, and our first on Sturgeon Bay. From the launch, near the mouth of Sturgeon Bay, at the main waters of Green Bay, it didn't look too rough. We figured we'd be fine heading right into Sturgeon Bay, where it seemed to be pretty well protected. Soon, the following rollers were high enough that I was reminded of this thread, and kept in mind the peril of getting swamped from behind. The rollers were far enough apart, that we were able to plane out without getting pounded. Not at high speed, but enough to get us quickly to a spot where we could begin trolling for walleye, or whatever would bite. We fished for a couple of hours in the relatively calm waters of the narrower part of the bay.

With the wind picking up, we decided it was time to call it a day, and head back to the launch. We had not realized the extent to which the wave activity had increased. It was not a fast ride back, but we made it with only a few instances of spray hitting the windshield, and nothing at all gushing over the bow. I was relieved to see how well the boat handled the conditions. In mind constantly, was the advice to work the throttle constantly, increasing power to climb the fronts of the waves, and pulling back for the ride down, and repeating to get the bow raised and climb, and so on, and so forth. Before long, I felt confident that both the boat and I were getting it right, and would get the crew in mostly dry, and all the way alive and safe. For that, I appreciate all here who contributed to this thread. Thank you.
Glad you made it back, with minimal spray on the windshield you must be pretty decent.
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  #76  
Old 05-22-2017, 05:48 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott C View Post
Glad you made it back, with minimal spray on the windshield you must be pretty decent.
I've been operating power boats for over 40 years. So yes, I suppose I'm pretty decent at it, thanks (unless there's sarcasm there I'm missing). Most of my experience has been in inland waters. This was my first time experiencing the large rollers. The ones you can't see over until you reach the top. It was a memorable time out on the water, and a lesson I'm happy to have under the belt.
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  #77  
Old 05-23-2017, 01:22 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Waterboy12 View Post
(do the larger ones always come in twos?)
Most often they come in threes, and are close together....they are called the "Three Sisters"....and, they are nasty.

Glad you made back in safely. (And, learned how to do it from reading this thread).
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  #78  
Old 05-23-2017, 03:46 PM
Scott C Scott C is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Waterboy12 View Post
I've been operating power boats for over 40 years. So yes, I suppose I'm pretty decent at it, thanks (unless there's sarcasm there I'm missing). Most of my experience has been in inland waters. This was my first time experiencing the large rollers. The ones you can't see over until you reach the top. It was a memorable time out on the water, and a lesson I'm happy to have under the belt.
Maybe a little sarcasm but some seriousness too. The size of wave stories are a lot like the size of fish stories with some people. Not saying that's you it just that way with a lot of them.
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  #79  
Old 05-25-2017, 06:51 AM
fishmanric fishmanric is offline
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I judge waves by how tight my *** cheeks are on the way back to camp. The last one lasted over an hour on a trip that usually takes about 20 minutes. I'll do it but still don't like it. I hate high winds even on land.
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  #80  
Old 05-30-2017, 10:23 AM
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Big water and big rollers were one reason I like either trim tabs or a hydrofoil on the motor. Gave me more control over the bow.
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