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  #1  
Old 03-20-2017, 10:23 AM
Multispecies Guy Multispecies Guy is offline
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Default Invasive carp found in St Croix River (lengthy)

----Copied and pasted from another website----

DNR reports first discovery of invasive silver carp in St. Croix River; Bighead carp also found during proactive monitoring

The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources has confirmed the first capture of a silver carp on the St. Croix River. The invasive carp was caught by a commercial angler near Prescott, Wis., during proactive monitoring in partnership with the DNR

“This news is disappointing but not unexpected,” said DNR invasive fish coordinator Nick Frohnauer. “The silver carp was captured within viewing distance of the St. Croix’s confluence with the Mississippi River. In 2014, two silver carp were found in the Mississippi only a short distance upstream from where the St. Croix and Mississippi meet.”

The silver carp caught on the St. Croix was 33 inches long and weighed 13 pounds.

One bighead carp was also caught by the commercial angler, who was working in conjunction with a DNR fisheries biologist. Bighead carp have previously been caught at this same location and further upstream on the St. Croix.

Frohnauer noted that while the DNR is concerned about the potential impacts of invasive carp in the St. Croix River, the individual fish that have been captured do not indicate reproduction or an established population of either bighead or silver carp in the St. Croix.

“The location where the carp were captured is a well-known over-wintering area for several species of fish,” Frohnauer said. “At this time, it is hard to predict if these individuals would have moved further upstream the St. Croix River, or back into the Mississippi River when water temperatures warm up in the spring.”

Immediate follow-up sampling was not possible on the St. Croix, as colder weather led to the river icing up. Once the ice clears, DNR staff will work with commercial anglers to survey for additional invasive carp near Prescott.

Additionally, the DNR will sample at the King Power Plant near Bayport, Minn., where bighead carp have been caught in the past. A commercial angler netting under the ice near the Bayport marina early in 2017 did not catch any invasive carp.

The DNR Invasive Species Program has built partnerships with state and federal agencies, conservation groups, university researchers and commercial businesses collaborating to prevent the spread of invasive carp:

The DNR is an active partner in the Upper Mississippi River invasive carp workgroup, which is working to limit the impact of invasive carp. The group includes representatives from Minnesota, Wisconsin, Iowa, Illinois, Missouri, and several federal agencies.
In partnership with the DNR, the Minnesota Aquatic Invasive Species Research Center at the University of Minnesota is testing carp deterrents in Mississippi River locks and dams. They have installed acoustic speakers at Lock 8 and modeled flows through the gates at dams 2 and 8.
DNR fisheries leads a comprehensive sampling program to monitor population expansion, population changes, and impacts of management actions. As part of this partnership with the commercial fishing community, a DNR field biologist was on site when the commercial angler captured the silver carp and bighead carp on the St. Croix.
The deterrent testing and sampling programs have been funded by the Environment and Natural Resources Trust Fund with proceeds from the state lottery.

Invasive carp have been progressing upstream since escaping into the Mississippi River in the 1970s. These large fish compete with native species and pose a threat to rivers and lakes. While no breeding populations have been detected in Minnesota waters, individual fish have been caught in the Mississippi near the Twin Cities, the St. Croix River and the Minnesota River.

Invasive carp captures must be reported to the DNR immediately. Call 651-587-2781 or email invasivecarp.dnr@state.mn.us. Take a photo and transport the carp to the nearest fisheries office or make arrangements for it to be picked up by a DNR official.

To learn more, visit mndnr.gov/invasivecarp, and attend the upcoming invasive carp stakeholder forum Wednesday, March 29, at the Minnesota Valley National Wildlife Refuge visitor center in Bloomington from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. For additional information about the forum, contact Nick Frohnauer, DNR invasive fish coordinator, 651-259-5670, nick.frohnauer@state.mnus.
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  #2  
Old 03-20-2017, 04:44 PM
Aspencreek Aspencreek is offline
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This is not good for native species, great if you like dodging carp in your boat.
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Old 03-20-2017, 04:53 PM
Multispecies Guy Multispecies Guy is offline
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No, not good news. Bowfishermen might like it.
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  #4  
Old 03-20-2017, 06:41 PM
FuzzyIL FuzzyIL is offline
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How will asian carp hurt native species fishing? Asian carp species do not eat natives fishes or fry. They are filter feeders . And there is nothing that be done to stop them. In fact the St. Croix River might be a bastion for these fish. Deep, strong current everything they need
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Old 03-20-2017, 07:18 PM
Aspencreek Aspencreek is offline
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Come on Fuzzy, look what has happened to the IL river, and the lower MISS.

Yes they are filter feeders, they ingest plankton and what it takes to keep the smaller minnows and baitfish alive, take them out of the food chain and the whole chain collapses except for the filter fish which continues to thrive. And within a few years those are the only fish to survive. These things making their way to the Great Lakes could be catastrophic. The Salmon, Trout, Lake Perch, Walleyes will all be in peril.

There are others that will be adding even more info.

They can be stopped, but it will take drastic measures, the electric fences in the Chicago canal is only a stop gap.

Last edited by Aspencreek; 03-20-2017 at 07:21 PM.
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Old 03-20-2017, 07:44 PM
FuzzyIL FuzzyIL is offline
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Aspen creek

You are very uneducated. There is tremendous amount of research on the internet to read and increase your understanding. Your fears overwhelm your understanding. First of all electric barriers are only a political deterrent. Fish of all species swim right through those barriers
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Old 03-20-2017, 07:46 PM
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AllenW AllenW is offline
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""Invasive carp captures must be reported to the DNR immediately. Call 651-587-2781 or email invasivecarp.dnr@state.mn.us. Take a photo and transport the carp to the nearest fisheries office or make arrangements for it to be picked up by a DNR official.""

I think they might get better response if you just took a picture and sent it to them, then killed it and dumped it back in the water?

al
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Old 03-20-2017, 07:52 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aspencreek View Post
Come on Fuzzy, look what has happened to the IL river, and the lower MISS.

Yes they are filter feeders, they ingest plankton and what it takes to keep the smaller minnows and baitfish alive, take them out of the food chain and the whole chain collapses except for the filter fish which continues to thrive. And within a few years those are the only fish to survive. These things making their way to the Great Lakes could be catastrophic. The Salmon, Trout, Lake Perch, Walleyes will all be in peril.

There are others that will be adding even more info.

They can be stopped, but it will take drastic measures, the electric fences in the Chicago canal is only a stop gap.
I don't think they can be stopped. There have been hundreds of attempts to stop aquatic invasive species of all types. Most of the efforts are feel good attempts at best but they don't work.

When zebra muscles were found in Green Bay everyone thought the world was coming to an end. Since then the water is cleaner, the walleye population has exploded, the musky fishery is world class and it's a destination location for whitefish. The perch population however is all but nonexistent.

I don't think the carp is a good thing but it's literally water over the **** and nobody really knows what the end results will be decades from now.
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Old 03-20-2017, 08:06 PM
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Twodogs Twodogs is offline
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Really Fuzzy... straight from US F&W website.

Densities of Asian carps in parts of the Mississippi River basin are thought to be among the highest in the world. In addition, Great Lakes fishery management agencies are highly concerned about the risk of Asian carps invading and becoming established there. Based on expert opinion, establishment of Asian carp populations in the Great Lakes would result in reduction in abundance and rate of growth of ecologically and economically important fishes there.
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is working to monitor and prevent the spread of aquatic nuisance species within the region. La Crosse, WI Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office has recruited partners including the Illinois Natural History Survey, Illinois DNR, and other fishery and ecological services offices to assist with sampling for Asian carp in the Illinois River, Illinois to the City of Chicago, Illinois ( view the poster). All fishery resources offices within the region will be monitoring for asian carp within their area.


Water Resources Reform and Development Act (WRRDA) Report To Congress
June 2012 - June 2014

Summary of Activities and Expenditures to Manage the Threat of Asian Carp in the Upper Mississippi and Ohio River Basins: A Report to Congress Pursuant to the Water Resources Reform and Development Act of 2014
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Old 03-21-2017, 06:08 AM
Aspencreek Aspencreek is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FuzzyIL View Post
Aspen creek

You are very uneducated. There is tremendous amount of research on the internet to read and increase your understanding. Your fears overwhelm your understanding. First of all electric barriers are only a political deterrent. Fish of all species swim right through those barriers
There is a tremendous amount of research, I suggest you read and try to understand it.

Most of us want clean clear water, not the muddy sludge that the carp produce, I understand there is a shortage of clear clean water in IL, but we like it here in WI. We also like our perch, walleye and bluegill fish fries, Silver Carp on the menu, I'll pass.

Last edited by Aspencreek; 03-21-2017 at 06:12 AM.
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