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  #1  
Old 03-03-2017, 07:17 AM
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team walleye team walleye is online now
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Default Bobber fishing for walleye

So I have never really targeted walleye with bobbers. This may sound stupid, but is there anything different I need to do other than what I normally would do bobber fishing for pan fish? Bobber size, hook, sinker, etc?

Thanks for the help!
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  #2  
Old 03-03-2017, 09:20 AM
Grumps Grumps is offline
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I really like the Thill Pro Series Weighted slip bobbers. Use with a 6 -7 1/2' whippy spinning rod, high vis mono and a 4' or so lighter mono or fluro leader. Terminal tackle depends on bait and day. Small jigs, larger ice fishing jigs, plain hook, or plain hook with a single bead. Large and jumbo leeches need a pretty big hook as they ball up in fish's mouth.
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  #3  
Old 03-03-2017, 10:12 AM
Kevin23 Kevin23 is online now
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No. And you will catch a lot of panfish doing it also... big ones on leeches.

I have tried jig heads and always had just a split shot and #4 octopus hook outfish the jigs.

I like a 6'8-7' medium moderate rod. You need a long rod with good backbone to get the hook set well and keep them buttoned up. Mono only, fluoro will sink and mess up your bobber. I use 6# almost exclusively.

You WILL catch some catfish and bass as well, so be prepared for a good fight.

Minnows, leeches, and whole nightcrawlers hooked in the center work well. Sometimes the crawlers outfish the others, sometimes they only hit leeches, sometimes minnows. I like to have all three baits in the boat if possible.

Be sure to let them take the bait for 30-45 seconds before setting the hook.


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  #4  
Old 03-03-2017, 11:47 AM
retire55 retire55 is offline
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One of the best $20 I ever spent was to buy Greg Bohn's Master the Art of Slip Bobbering
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  #5  
Old 03-03-2017, 02:24 PM
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Kevin23 is on point. I do not like the weighted bobbers myself. We fish Mille Lacs, lots of rock piles. A non-weighted bobber will lay over if you're bait is in the rocks, a weighted one will not.

I like a plain, red, or blue Gamakatsu octopus in a #6, and enough weight to get the bobber close to neutral buoyancy. It reduces the resistance when the fish takes the bait. I also like the Thill brand of slip bobbers. When the bobber goes down, slowly point the rod tip at the bobber and start to take up line. When you start to feel the weight of the fish, the slack is out of the line. That's the time to set the hook.

Don't discount the "drift" or "sweep" factor. Two in the boat, throw out well upwind, and let the bobber settle and drift downwind. Neutral buoyancy will slow the drift. When you've traversed the entire length of the boat. I like to reel up to the back of the boat, and drop it again, allowing near the boat coverage from the stern back. Keep working your way farther from the boat. Rod length will dictate your ability to secure a hookset at distance. As with many things in life, longer is always better.

Last edited by bigwalleye1; 03-03-2017 at 02:27 PM.
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  #6  
Old 03-03-2017, 04:40 PM
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There have been very good responses so far. A couple of things I would add are, as far as weighted or unweighted Thill bobbers (pro series w/brass grommet, being my choice) is when to use which one over the other. In a situation as bigwalleye1 referred to I for the most part also prefer unweighted. However, a weighted Thill, does allow a lighter presentation & a weighted Thill can be very important if you were to shore fish or dock fish (easier to cast far if needed).
As far as how much time to give before setting the hook, is similar to me as live bait rig fishing goes (give longer or shorter, based on whether you are missing hooksets or are gut hooking them and go from there (doesn't hurt to start by giving longer in the beginning as Kevin23 recommended).

retire55, has good advice, Bohns' book is the best on this subject matter.
Remember, you don't have to cast a mile from the boat (if fishing in a boat), just don't make noise and you can keep the bobber closer to the boat for easier hooksets.

Good Luck!
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  #7  
Old 03-03-2017, 04:58 PM
Kevin23 Kevin23 is online now
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I didn't touch on weighted vs unweighted bobbers and bobber size so I'll throw my 2 cents in now.

Weighted- only for when you need extra casting distance. Not really practical from a boat, but from shore they are sometimes needed. I want to see the light bites from walleye, and especially want to see when I get a little too deep and I am on bottom.

99.9% of the time I am using an oval balsa 3/4" from bass pro shops. http://www.basspro.com/Bass-Pro-Shop...product/52867/

That bobber is the perfect size for walleye IMO, with a #5 split shot. I also have a handful of 7/8 and 1" on hand also, I use the 7/8 when it is really windy and the 3/4 is being taken under too much due to waves. The 1" is only used for one thing, big chubs.

Just about everyone that I take slip bobber fishing for walleye try using 7/8 or 1" bobbers because they are easier to see. Well, walleye are VERY resistance shy, they often bite by "popping" the bobber once and then slowly running off with it. With the bigger bobbers they get the "pop" and then the fish runs for about 3 seconds and spits it out because he felt the bobber. I always tell my friends to cut off that bobber and use mine, but they are always stubborn and want to see the big bobber.

Slip bobbers are usually finesse tactic, so treat it as such.
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  #8  
Old 03-06-2017, 07:32 AM
BornToFish BornToFish is offline
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Greetings,

There are several great responses to the original post that address selection of bobber. I tend to use fixed bobbers when the depth of presentation is around four feet or less, as I won't have to be concerned with winding the bobber into the rod's tip. I switch over to slip bobbers when the depth of presentation is over about four feet.

Fishing with slip bobbers for walleyes is a very common presentation on nearby Lake Winnebago during the spring post-spawn. the walleyes are frequenting shallow rock reefs near shore, in 2-12 fow. We put out a spread of slip bobbers over a bare hook with either a night crawler or leech.

I want to comment on the hooks that I use under a slip bobber. I have been very pleased with Gamakatsu's Octopus style hook that is tied with a standard snell knot. I mostly use size #2 or #1, sometimes even going up to #1/0. These hooks come in a variety of colors. This may sound extremely large to some anglers, but they work great! I often put a colorful plastic bead (size 4mm) above the hook if the water is murky.

I add a splitshot sinker or two to help keep the hook near the bottom, in view of current and/or waves. The size of the splitshot(s) is governed by how much current or waves are present.

I often have out two slip bobbers for each angler in the boat. The angler's then pitch jigs from the ends of the boat. I normally keep a slip bobber by the side of the boat. It's amazing how many times this bobber gets bit - presumably by the jigs drawing followers.

Good fishing and tight lines!!
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  #9  
Old 03-06-2017, 08:32 AM
StrutNut StrutNut is offline
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I too used unweighted bobbers. I also will add I usually will go with high visibility lines so its easy to real up slack to set the hook. We throw out fairly far from boat and if there is any wind we have slack in line so bobber wont just come right back to boat. I too use a plain hook over a jig head. We often fish breaks in depth, humps or weed line edges. I prefer trolling but sometimes there is just too many in the boat to make it work.
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  #10  
Old 03-06-2017, 11:26 AM
Lake Wisconsin Lake Wisconsin is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BornToFish View Post
Greetings,

There are several great responses to the original post that address selection of bobber. I tend to use fixed bobbers when the depth of presentation is around four feet or less, as I won't have to be concerned with winding the bobber into the rod's tip. I switch over to slip bobbers when the depth of presentation is over about four feet.

Fishing with slip bobbers for walleyes is a very common presentation on nearby Lake Winnebago during the spring post-spawn. the walleyes are frequenting shallow rock reefs near shore, in 2-12 fow. We put out a spread of slip bobbers over a bare hook with either a night crawler or leech.

I want to comment on the hooks that I use under a slip bobber. I have been very pleased with Gamakatsu's Octopus style hook that is tied with a standard snell knot. I mostly use size #2 or #1, sometimes even going up to #1/0. These hooks come in a variety of colors. This may sound extremely large to some anglers, but they work great! I often put a colorful plastic bead (size 4mm) above the hook if the water is murky.

I add a splitshot sinker or two to help keep the hook near the bottom, in view of current and/or waves. The size of the splitshot(s) is governed by how much current or waves are present.

I often have out two slip bobbers for each angler in the boat. The angler's then pitch jigs from the ends of the boat. I normally keep a slip bobber by the side of the boat. It's amazing how many times this bobber gets bit - presumably by the jigs drawing followers.

Good fishing and tight lines!!
Also fish 'bago quite a bit. One year I kept track and landed 189 walleye off of slip bobbers - so it can be very, very effective.

I run a slightly different combo than most. I like my rods long and whippy. So I have converted some of my 7 or 8' steelhead rods to my slip-bobber rods. I run powerpro or 832 as my main line, with the bobber on my main line, attach a small swivel with a bead above the swivel, then floro, either 4 or 6# test, and a hook or small jig. We often cast out our rigs as far as we can get them, and with this combo, can get amazing hook sets.
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