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  #1  
Old 03-18-2017, 06:08 AM
seaotter seaotter is offline
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Default Lube for trolling motor plug

Do any of you guys use silicone spray or some other lube on the V groove trolling motor plugs? Mine seem to be very hard to plug in and unplug, on my Lund. I will admit it does not come unplugged once plugged in. I just wish it would work a little easier, as I unplug it to recharge batteries. TIA
Have a great day.
JIM
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  #2  
Old 03-18-2017, 07:15 AM
andersaki andersaki is online now
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Jim,

I have never unplugged my TM to charge my batteries. When my Terrova is in the stowed position, it is off, so no current should flow past the switch. However, if I had to lube the plug with anything I would use dielectric grease. Maybe a good cleaning of the plug, perhaps with a light abrasive, such as fine sand paper or steel wool would do the trick. Just be sure to disconnect the cables at the battery end before using steel wool or you may get a shock.

andersaki
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  #3  
Old 03-18-2017, 08:32 AM
Custom Eyes Custom Eyes is offline
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Same as the previous poster, I never unplug mine to charge. Whatever you do, don't use silicone. Silicone is an electrical insulator and will hamper current flow. Dielectric grease if anything as previously mentioned.
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  #4  
Old 03-18-2017, 09:22 AM
REW REW is online now
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SeaOtter,
Silicone grease works well for this purpose

When you plug in the connector, the plug will wipe off any grease that might happen to be on the electrical connectors.

The excess grease will form a water and air tight seal that will prevent corrosion from forming.

I use the same thing on my trailer plug connectors as well as when I used to run common bulbs in my trailer lights. i.e. a generous coating of grease to form a water and air tight seat to prevent corrosion.

Never have issues with plug removal and never any issues with corrosion or dirt getting into the connectors.

I also use this grease to grease the top of my spark plugs before putting wires on the motor plugs, whether it is in the outboard motor or one of the vehicles. Again, the wiping action of the contact removes the grease from the connector, but the excess grease then forms a water and air tight seal to prevent corrosion. Also, the grease on the inside of the boat, helps to facilitate boot and connector removal - next time that the plugs are serviced.

------------------
In addition, I will often use the trolling motor socket to charge my trolling motor batteries, as well as my starting battery. I just plug in a spare trolling motor plug, hook up the charger and I am good to go.

Take care

p.s.
Do NOT use conductive grease on a wiring connection involving connectors with multiple connections in a single connector. . The reason NOT to use conductive grease on a wiring connector where there are multiple connectors is that the conductive grease would short out adjacent conductors.

However, DO use conductive grease for bus bar connectors, fuse box connections of individual wires to individual connectors. Also use conductive grease if you are putting wires into a connection that is made of a different material. A notable example of a required use of conductive grease is when aluminum wiring is installed in a main bus box. The conductive grease eliminates the potential galvanic corrosion that can occur with close contact of two dissimilar metals and allows for a very good long term contact of the wire to the connector.

p.p.s.
By the way - Dielectric grease is not conductive. However, it is a very excellent grease to use in marine and other moist environments to insure water tight and air tight seals of conductors to minimize corrosion.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silicone_grease

Last edited by REW; 03-19-2017 at 04:20 AM.
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  #5  
Old 03-18-2017, 10:10 AM
Custom Eyes Custom Eyes is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by REW View Post
SeaOtter,
You can use wheel bearing grease as well as any similar grease.

When you plug in the connector, the plug will wipe off any grease that might happen to be on the electrical connectors.

The excess grease will form a water and air tight seal that will prevent corrosion from forming.

I use the same thing on my trailer plug connectors as well as when I used to run common bulbs in my trailer lights. i.e. a generous coating of grease to form a water and air tight seat to prevent corrosion.

Never have issues with plug removal and never any issues with corrosion or dirt getting into the connectors.

I also use common grease to grease the top of my spark plugs before putting wires on the motor plugs, whether it is in the outboard motor or one of the vehicles. Again, the wiping action of the contact removes the grease from the connector, but the excess grease then forms a water and air tight seal to prevent corrosion. Also, the grease on the inside of the boat, helps to facilitate boot and connector removal - next time that the plugs are serviced.

------------------
In addition, I will often use the trolling motor socket to charge my trolling motor batteries, as well as my starting battery. I just plug in a spare trolling motor plug, hook up the charger and I am good to go.

Take care

p.s.
Do NOT use conductive grease on a wiring connection involving connectors with multiple connections in a single connector. . The reason NOT to use conductive grease on a wiring connector where there are multiple connectors is that the conductive grease would short out adjacent conductors.

However, DO use conductive grease for bus bar connectors, fuse box connections of individual wires to individual connectors. Also use conductive grease if you are putting wires into a connection that is made of a different material. A notable example of a required use of conductive grease is when aluminum wiring is installed in a main bus box. The conductive grease eliminates the potential galvanic corrosion that can occur with close contact of two dissimilar metals and allows for a very good long term contact of the wire to the connector.

p.p.s.
By the way - Dielectric grease is not conductive. However, it is a very excellent grease to use in marine and other moist environments to insure water tight and air tight seals of conductors to minimize corrosion.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silicone_grease

The type and viscosity of silicone used for sprays vs dielectric grease are two totally different animals.

Also, be careful about slopping on any ole grease on electrical connections. If there is copper involved and the grease doesn't have a copper passivator in it, the copper will corrode, lose conductivity, and become brittle. Special additives to prevent copper corrosion go into grease for electrical connections. This is the test we do when formulating a grease for electrical connections. The wrong grease will leave you with something other than 1a or 1b and continually get worse over time.


http://oil-club.de/index.php?attachm...standards-jpg/

Last edited by Custom Eyes; 03-18-2017 at 10:24 AM.
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  #6  
Old 03-18-2017, 11:12 AM
Kevin23 Kevin23 is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by andersaki View Post
Jim,

I have never unplugged my TM to charge my batteries. When my Terrova is in the stowed position, it is off, so no current should flow past the switch. However, if I had to lube the plug with anything I would use dielectric grease. Maybe a good cleaning of the plug, perhaps with a light abrasive, such as fine sand paper or steel wool would do the trick. Just be sure to disconnect the cables at the battery end before using steel wool or you may get a shock.

andersaki
Check it with a multimeter.
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  #7  
Old 03-18-2017, 01:11 PM
Snowking Snowking is offline
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Make sure the plug did not get stepped on at some point. One of the blades might be bent in or out a small amount. You can buy little squeeze containers of Dielectric grease for low money. It does not make sense to me why you would use wheel bearing grease. The dielectric grease is also allot easier to clean up if you get some in the boat. That compared to wheel bearing grease.
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  #8  
Old 03-18-2017, 02:16 PM
Kevin23 Kevin23 is online now
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My autozone has a small box of packets of dielectric grease on the counter with a "take one" sign. I grab one every time I am in there and have a decent stash in the garage. Goes on all electrical components that are connected together for long periods of time and may get wet.

You can buy a small squeeze tube of it at almost any auto parts store or electronics shop. Its like $3 a tube.. or sometimes they sell the little packets for $0.79. One packet would do what you need.

I see no reason why anyone would ever want to put wheel bearing grease in their boat.. What a mess that would be if you ever spilled any of it on carpet. Dielectric grease is CLEAR so if you do spill, you can wipe it up and not have any issues. I swear, some of the "life hack" type stuff REW comes up with is golden.
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  #9  
Old 03-18-2017, 02:37 PM
Custom Eyes Custom Eyes is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kevin23 View Post
My autozone has a small box of packets of dielectric grease on the counter with a "take one" sign. I grab one every time I am in there and have a decent stash in the garage. Goes on all electrical components that are connected together for long periods of time and may get wet.

You can buy a small squeeze tube of it at almost any auto parts store or electronics shop. Its like $3 a tube.. or sometimes they sell the little packets for $0.79. One packet would do what you need.

I see no reason why anyone would ever want to put wheel bearing grease in their boat.. What a mess that would be if you ever spilled any of it on carpet. Dielectric grease is CLEAR so if you do spill, you can wipe it up and not have any issues. I swear, some of the "life hack" type stuff REW comes up with is golden.

And he wonders why he has some of these bizarre unexplainable problems with things. This isn't the 40's where your materials and options were very limited. You have to be careful what you use on things these days with all the different materials and chemicals out there now. My FIL kills sooooooooooo much equipment and soooo many vehicles because he's stuck back in the 40-50's and wants to do and maintain everything the way they did back then.
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  #10  
Old 03-18-2017, 05:14 PM
REW REW is online now
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Custom -
Good advice.
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