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  #1  
Old 03-19-2017, 05:44 PM
REELMAN REELMAN is offline
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Default running motor before oil change

how many people run their engines before a 4 stoke oil change to get them hot???
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  #2  
Old 03-19-2017, 06:21 PM
Nope
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I do just the opposite, change it after its sat a day or two all of the oil will be in the pan, I usually leave it drip out overnight and put fresh oil in the next day.
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  #3  
Old 03-19-2017, 07:10 PM
Miltona Miltona is offline
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Usually warm it up, not necessarily hot. then let it drain overnight.
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  #4  
Old 03-19-2017, 07:28 PM
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I do mine cold the oil will all be in the pan, and my oil filter will be dry no mess, I take the keys out and leave it drain over night usually.
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  #5  
Old 03-20-2017, 04:45 AM
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Bobby Winds Bobby Winds is offline
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I was taught at Alfred State University to ALWAYS bring the motor to operating temp before draining the oil.

Bob
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Old 03-20-2017, 06:31 AM
h8go4s h8go4s is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobby Winds View Post
I was taught at Alfred State University to ALWAYS bring the motor to operating temp before draining the oil.

Bob
And all the guys from Alfred State University who work in an auto repair shop pull the car in the garage, hoist it up, pull the drain plug (some of them use a vise-grip), replace the filter, replace the plug and dump in new oil. Winter or summer, same procedure. Ten-minute oil change $49.99. If you think it works any differently at a marine shop, you're delusional.

Hot or cold, you'll never get all the oil drained out of an engine. Draining an outboard overnight works fine.
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  #7  
Old 03-20-2017, 08:16 AM
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Bobby Winds Bobby Winds is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by h8go4s View Post
And all the guys from Alfred State University who work in an auto repair shop pull the car in the garage, hoist it up, pull the drain plug (some of them use a vise-grip), replace the filter, replace the plug and dump in new oil. Winter or summer, same procedure. Ten-minute oil change $49.99. If you think it works any differently at a marine shop, you're delusional.

Hot or cold, you'll never get all the oil drained out of an engine. Draining an outboard overnight works fine.
Alfred grads don't change oil, but rather engines/trannies, etc in most made Detroit vehicles.

Dealership's pay guys like you to do grease monkey jobs for minimum wage.
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Custom designed and built rod holders
Custom designed and built down rigger platforms
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  #8  
Old 03-20-2017, 08:36 AM
REW REW is offline
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Reelman,
Generally speaking it is always best to drain oil when it is piping hot and has been cycling with the engine running.

The same is true for changing the lower unit oil in the outboard motor drive system.

You like to have the oil really hot, really mixed up with any items that might have been laying on the bottom of the pan - up and in suspension in the oil of the motor or of the lower unit.

Let the oil drain, until no more oil drains out of the drain hole whether it takes 30 seconds or 48 hours.

Replace the plugs, replace the oil filter that has also been draining - if there is an oil filter hole to drain out, replace the oil, replace all of the plugs and go enjoy your motor.

Also, some oil drain plugs have magnets in them. If so, be sure to remove any metal filings or shavings that might have been trapped on the drain plug when the plug is removed.


Good luck
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  #9  
Old 03-20-2017, 08:37 AM
Custom Eyes Custom Eyes is online now
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Vehicle, boat, or whatever, I always warm the engine up first. Oil filters come off so much easier when warm.
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  #10  
Old 03-20-2017, 09:37 AM
REW REW is offline
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I remember a story from long ago.

A friend of mine had purchased a used smaller outboard motor.

After purchasing the motor - he drained out the cold lower unit oil from the lower unit and after it was well drained, he installed new fresh lower unit oil.

Then, just to do a check on his theory, he put the motor on a stand with the lower unit in a barrel of water.

He then started up the motor and rant if for an hour at 1/2 throttle in gear in the barrel of water with a garden hose running into the barrel to replace any water that was being pumped out of the barrel while the motor was running.

Hd really had no idea as to the number of hours that were on the motor when he had purchased the motor. But, it started and ran well so he had purchased it for use on a particular boat.

At any rate - to complete his experiment, he then, tilted up the motor, removed the barrel of water, dropped the motor and drained the lower unit oil from the motor.

Remember a couple of hours earlier he has replaced 100% of the lower unit oil.

But after this time of running the motor and lower unit at 1/2 throttle for an hour, he then drained the lower unit oil again.

He did not find any metal chips in the oil which would be indicative of gear issues, but he did find a lot of silvery specs in the oil along with some significant oil discoloration due to this hour of running and then draining the oil hot.

This experiment simply confirmed his belief to drain the oil (lower unit) hot and well mixed, to insure that any "particles of what ever" were picked up by the oil, left in suspension and then drained out when the hot oil was drained from the lower unit.

Really makes sense to mix up oil to be drained from an engine - (any part of the engine) to be drained hot and well agitated to also drain out any particles of (what ever) that might have been picked up by the rotating parts, and the agitation of the oil while the engine is running - including the spining gears in the lower unit.

Good luck

p.s.
If you do this on the driveway - it is not a bad idea to remove the prop before doing this engine running on the driveway to prevent any possible personal injury from the spinning prop in the driveway.
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