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  #21  
Old 09-16-2016, 11:03 PM
Hanr3 Hanr3 is offline
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REW, really!
Your wasting your money. But its your money, go ahead and waste it.

If your tire is bouncing down the road you have bigger issues. Most likely your tongue weight is wrong. Either to heavy or too light. If the tongue is down the brakes could be applying and releasing as the tongue levels out, thus bouncing down the highway. Or it could be they are driving faster than the rated speed for the trailer tire, it is a trailer tire correct? Another possibility is worn out truck springs. The trailer tongue must sit level. Or the tires are under inflated. Tire balance is NOT the issue.

Remember, trailer tires have stiffer sidewalls then your truck tires. The sidewall carries the load, all of the load. There are no shocks to dampen road bounce. Also remember that trailer tires are following tires, they do not power the vehicle, or turn the vehicle, they follow. This means the tire is designed differently than truck tires. They are also narrower to reduce heat build up and run cooler. Trailer tires also don't have the sophisticated suspension systems your truck does. There are no anti-sway bars, no shocks, no air bags, nothing.

Out of round tires can be balanced, however that doesn't make them round. Road Force matching is the only way to "correct" out of round tires. In all my years in the service center, I only returned one set of tires because they couldn't be road force balanced. Manufactures test tires before shipment. They have a reputation to maintain too.

Another article to read.
http://www.westmarine.com/WestAdviso...er-Tire-Basics
Notice, not one word on balancing trailer tires.

Fuel for thought, the guys who make their living balancing tires are telling you not to balance trailer tires. Doesn't that seem odd? You would think they would be the first to promote extra sales revenue? Why not take your money for something that doesn't make any difference? Sounds like easy dishonest money to me. Maybe they are being honest, maybe they know their business, and just maybe they are trying to save you money. But hey, its your money, they will gladly take it if you insist on giving it away. One last question, how many trailer suspension components have you replaced due to unbalanced tires? Yep, unbalanced tires on your truck will eat tie-rod ends, eat shocks, eat sway-bar links, ball joints, and eat other tires. None of that happens on trailers though, they don't have those components to wear out. There is no reason to balance trailer tires. Keep them at the proper psi and you shouldn't have any problems. They will not sag like truck tires when under inflated. You must check the psi with a gage.

I bet you still change your oil every 3,000 miles and change the transmission filter when you do a fluid swap too?
Just trying to have an intelligent conversation here.

Why do you balance your trailer tires? What is the purpose?

Last edited by Hanr3; 09-16-2016 at 11:27 PM.
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  #22  
Old 09-16-2016, 11:40 PM
REW REW is offline
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Han R,
I balance tires to keep the tires from bouncing.

I have simply seen a lot of trailer tires bounding before balancing and no longer bouncing after balancing not to balance my tires - including trailer tires.

But, again, this is what is wonderful about object ownership.

One can balance a tire if one wishes or not balance a tire if one doesn't wish to not balance.

So, if you wish, balance your tires.

Or, if you don't wish to - then don't balance your tires.

Your choice.
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  #23  
Old 09-16-2016, 11:46 PM
REW REW is offline
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http://www.thehulltruth.com/trucks-t...r-tires.html#b
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  #24  
Old 09-19-2016, 02:07 PM
Hanr3 Hanr3 is offline
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and yet another thread of personal opinion. Repeating the same thing over and over doesn't make it true. Show me the evidence that trailer tires must be balanced. I provided the articles written by peers and experts to counter.

Here is one more from the manufacture.
http://www.loadstartrailertires.com/...FAQ_ep_47.html

4. Should I balance my trailer tires?


None of our tire and wheel assemblies come balanced from the factory.


Although some customers do insist upon balancing their trailer tires most (98%) do not. Trailer tires have a tendency to "throw weights". Meaning the weights come off the wheels. This can happen for a number of reasons, but it is not uncommon for the weights to be thrown off when towing a trailer empty (the trailer bounces excessively b/c of the no load conditions) or when making very tight turns on tandem or tri axle trailers.


Furthermore, galvanized trailer wheels are not designed to be balanced. When the steel wheel is dipped into the vat of molten galvanized and then pulled out, some of the liquid zinc always accumulates on one end. Which makes galvanized wheels incredibly difficult to balance. But the galvanized coating does provide one of the best corrosion resistance to harsh environments such as salt water.


Most automotive centers are not equipped with the proper wheel balancing machine to correctly balance most trailer wheels. All of our trailer wheels are a lug centric design. Meaning, that the wheels are centered on the hub by the torque of the lug nuts. Most/many automotive wheels are a hub centric design. Many automotive centers use a computerized "cone" balancer which works great on hub centric wheels, but not on lug centric trailer wheels. In order to balance trailer wheels, an adapter must be used on the cone balancer to correctly balance trailer rims. Check with your automotive center to see if they keep the adapter on hand. Read the details about balancing lug centric trailer wheels here.

Further evidence that balancing is not required or recommended.
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  #25  
Old 09-19-2016, 05:43 PM
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Bobby Winds Bobby Winds is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hanr3 View Post
and yet another thread of personal opinion. Repeating the same thing over and over doesn't make it true. Show me the evidence that trailer tires must be balanced. I provided the articles written by peers and experts to counter.

Here is one more from the manufacture.
http://www.loadstartrailertires.com/...FAQ_ep_47.html

4. Should I balance my trailer tires?


None of our tire and wheel assemblies come balanced from the factory.


Although some customers do insist upon balancing their trailer tires most (98%) do not. Trailer tires have a tendency to "throw weights". Meaning the weights come off the wheels. This can happen for a number of reasons, but it is not uncommon for the weights to be thrown off when towing a trailer empty (the trailer bounces excessively b/c of the no load conditions) or when making very tight turns on tandem or tri axle trailers.


Furthermore, galvanized trailer wheels are not designed to be balanced. When the steel wheel is dipped into the vat of molten galvanized and then pulled out, some of the liquid zinc always accumulates on one end. Which makes galvanized wheels incredibly difficult to balance. But the galvanized coating does provide one of the best corrosion resistance to harsh environments such as salt water.


Most automotive centers are not equipped with the proper wheel balancing machine to correctly balance most trailer wheels. All of our trailer wheels are a lug centric design. Meaning, that the wheels are centered on the hub by the torque of the lug nuts. Most/many automotive wheels are a hub centric design. Many automotive centers use a computerized "cone" balancer which works great on hub centric wheels, but not on lug centric trailer wheels. In order to balance trailer wheels, an adapter must be used on the cone balancer to correctly balance trailer rims. Check with your automotive center to see if they keep the adapter on hand. Read the details about balancing lug centric trailer wheels here.

Further evidence that balancing is not required or recommended.
So, how many tow their boat trailers "empty ".
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  #26  
Old 09-20-2016, 05:44 AM
wellpastcold wellpastcold is offline
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I must admit that I have learned something on this thread. I had no idea about the difference between lug and hub centric designs. Interesting information indeed.
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  #27  
Old 09-20-2016, 08:08 AM
REW REW is offline
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For the folks who do not think that they should balance their trailer tires, drive down the road and watch for the trailers with bouncing wheels.

Then, if it were possible - observe the same trailer running down the road after the wheels have been balanced.

I read the counter argument about galvanized wheels being tough to balance, need to have the correct equipment to balance the tires, etc.

But, just because a job is difficult to do, does not mean that the job should not be done and done well.

All right, if a weight gets thrown off on an empty bouncing trailer tire, then go ahead and balance the tires again.

Simply put, trailers pull more smoothly, and tires last longer if they are run with a balanced set of tires compared to not being balanced.

Be safe
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  #28  
Old 09-20-2016, 08:22 AM
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I don't have any links or experts to quote. I just know I put new tires on a skid loader trailer years ago and the trailer transferred a lot of vibration to the tow vehicle and would begin to fish tail at 65mph even though it had the proper tongue weight. I had the tires balanced at Kraemer Spring and the problems went away. They also checked the wheel alignment and it was fine. Kraemer services many commercial fleets and probably has the right equipment.
Since then I have always had the trailer tires balanced.
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  #29  
Old 09-20-2016, 09:49 AM
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I think EVERY tire should be balanced. We are traveling down highways at high speeds 55-80 mph these days and if those tires are not balanced it is magnified even more.

Guys, we spend a LOT of money on our rigs and to save $10 per tire for balance in not only being cheap but just plain stupid IMHO.

If you truly believe your trailer tires should not be balance then your rear axle tires on you tow vehicle should not be too.


Bob
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  #30  
Old 09-21-2016, 03:53 PM
Hanr3 Hanr3 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobby Winds View Post
I think EVERY tire should be balanced. We are traveling down highways at high speeds 55-80 mph these days and if those tires are not balanced it is magnified even more.

Guys, we spend a LOT of money on our rigs and to save $10 per tire for balance in not only being cheap but just plain stupid IMHO.

If you truly believe your trailer tires should not be balance then your rear axle tires on you tow vehicle should not be too.


Bob
Three things.
What is the speed rating for your trailer tires? I doubt its 80mph.
Your opinion.
Your tow vehicle rear axle is part of the vehicle suspension system. It will be affected by unbalanced tires. Besides, you shouldn't have trailer tires on your tow vehicle.

Do some research, I know this is a new concept for some of you. There is facts and evidence from the experts to back it up. I realize change can be hard. At one time people thought the world was flat.
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