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  #21  
Old 01-09-2017, 03:13 PM
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Pooch Pooch is offline
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Originally Posted by AllenW View Post
This is the club I belong to, if the link works, look at some of the stuff these guys turn out, pretty impressive.


http://www.mnwwg.org/


Al
I now feel so inadequate.... Maybe another new fishing rod will bring my self esteem up.

Some people are so dog gone talented. Wow.

Pooch
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  #22  
Old 01-09-2017, 07:39 PM
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AllenW AllenW is offline
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I now feel so inadequate.... Maybe another new fishing rod will bring my self esteem up.

Some people are so dog gone talented. Wow.

Pooch
What was nice is these guys helped me find what I could do and how to do what I didn't think I could.

But still some of their stuff is just unbelievable.
So I backed off a bit and do stuff that I can have fun with, inlays are terribly time consuming for me, but sometimes they really put a smile on my face.

Don't do much woodworking during the winter though.

Al
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  #23  
Old 01-10-2017, 04:57 AM
REW REW is offline
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Sportfish,
If you do decide to make and sell items you want to shoot for a reasonable amount for your labor.

So, when doing a project - stay on a time clock so that you can record the amount of time you spend on an object.

Then, take the $$ spent for materials. Take the hours of labor and multiply it by a reasonable amount of $$ that your time is worth. On the downside - something like $20 per hour.

So, if you spend 20 hours on a job and $50 for materials, you should charge something like $450 for the item.

Good luck
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  #24  
Old 01-10-2017, 04:25 PM
Burr Burr is offline
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My BIL used to do wood working as a sideline business. His parents did the same - so he learned the approach from his parents, and started doing the same from the time he was a teen.

He built craft type things, and sold them during the summer months at craft shows. His schedule was basically to build things into his inventory as fast as he could all winter long, and when the craft shows started he managed his inventory - what was selling well, what was running low on inventory, and target those items during summer time building.

He ended up being really efficient building a defined/limited number of products. In his professional life - he became an electrical engineer, so you can imaging his thought process. Darn engineers.

He built plate rails, cloak hangers, cutting boards, clocks of many different styles, mantels, bedrails, headboards, quilt hangers. Basically smaller stuff, that he produced in volume, and sold in volume. He liked building things on the lathe because when it came off the lathe it was generally all prepared for finish. He had a trough for applying finish, and purchased stain in 55 gallon drums.

He had air conditioning in his shop before he had air conditioning in his house.

He worked 10-12 art shows in a 3 state area. Had a 3/4 ton cargo van that pulled a 14' enclosed trailer. He was often packed high and tight when he went to the craft show, and came home very near sold out. Over the years, he got very good at knowing how much of what would sell at each venue.

He eventually started reducing the number of craft shows he would attend, and later on contracted with his sister to work the craft shows and he stayed home, and then eventually shut it down.

He consistently made 30K-40K as a sideline business. But let me tell you he spent a lot of time in his shop, and he was very efficient at building his products. He did this for more than a couple of decades.

He also owned an electrical engineering company with a couple of partners. When that business sold for 8 million, he backed off on woodworking.

It can be done.
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  #25  
Old 01-11-2017, 03:55 AM
brigeton brigeton is offline
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Good for him but when did he fish?
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  #26  
Old 01-11-2017, 06:08 AM
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Once again, thanks for the advice. I think I will keep it simple. I don't want the bottom of my boat to ever dry out in the summer!
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  #27  
Old 01-11-2017, 06:09 AM
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Baseline Baseline is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Burr View Post
My BIL used to do wood working as a sideline business. His parents did the same - so he learned the approach from his parents, and started doing the same from the time he was a teen.

He built craft type things, and sold them during the summer months at craft shows. His schedule was basically to build things into his inventory as fast as he could all winter long, and when the craft shows started he managed his inventory - what was selling well, what was running low on inventory, and target those items during summer time building.

He ended up being really efficient building a defined/limited number of products. In his professional life - he became an electrical engineer, so you can imaging his thought process. Darn engineers.

He built plate rails, cloak hangers, cutting boards, clocks of many different styles, mantels, bedrails, headboards, quilt hangers. Basically smaller stuff, that he produced in volume, and sold in volume. He liked building things on the lathe because when it came off the lathe it was generally all prepared for finish. He had a trough for applying finish, and purchased stain in 55 gallon drums.

He had air conditioning in his shop before he had air conditioning in his house.

He worked 10-12 art shows in a 3 state area. Had a 3/4 ton cargo van that pulled a 14' enclosed trailer. He was often packed high and tight when he went to the craft show, and came home very near sold out. Over the years, he got very good at knowing how much of what would sell at each venue.

He eventually started reducing the number of craft shows he would attend, and later on contracted with his sister to work the craft shows and he stayed home, and then eventually shut it down.

He consistently made 30K-40K as a sideline business. But let me tell you he spent a lot of time in his shop, and he was very efficient at building his products. He did this for more than a couple of decades.

He also owned an electrical engineering company with a couple of partners. When that business sold for 8 million, he backed off on woodworking.

It can be done.
I guess a sideline business can be whatever you call it, but, to me, your BIL had a manufacturing business. It was a lot more than some guy messing around in his shop and then selling off a few excess pieces he made pursuing his hobby. If the $30K to $40K was a net profit he was doing pretty good for himself for a sideline business.
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  #28  
Old 01-12-2017, 12:38 AM
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Flight2205 Flight2205 is offline
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Default It has been good for us

I have done numerous custom kitchens, of high quality, and the extra income has been a great asset to our family over the years.

I took a few years off, with the birth of our third child. Now, I am resetting a bit, and trying to get into a niche market...shuffleboard

I think the specialty market might offer more to us...not many custom shuffleboard builders arround here...we'll see what happens.

A few pics attached of a play field I am working on, with all custom walnut inlays.

Take care and good luck.
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  #29  
Old 01-12-2017, 02:18 AM
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Flight2205

That is really pretty.

Grew up playing shuffleboard at the local family tavern in a small rural town. Loved the game. Never see a shuffle board anymore. Probably got an "App" for kids now days..... pity.

Are you building everything yourself?

Pooch
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  #30  
Old 01-12-2017, 02:07 PM
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Originally Posted by sportfish1 View Post
Just a quick question. I do a fair amount of woodworking. some furniture, shelving etc. My wife and sons along with their wives and some friends have told me I should start selling some items. Does anyone have any experience with this? Is it more headache than value? If you have done successfully, what method of selling did you use? I'm going to retire in 4 1/2 years, and she already has me working again!
Thanks!

Depends on what you make. My step-dad has a shop in superior, wi. Has for 20 years now and does well. He started it as a hobby that morphed into what he has now. Building custom cabinets and furniture for homes. He also makes things on a CNC machine that he sells. Per hour of work he makes out way better on the CNC creations. I don't think it's a headache if you make quility items.
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