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  #1  
Old 08-28-2008, 12:22 PM
old bulldog old bulldog is offline
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Default transom replacement material

I need to know what material would be best for an old aluma craft boat transom. Thank you for any help.
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  #2  
Old 08-28-2008, 02:39 PM
SSH SSH is offline
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Checkout Seacast Transom Saver http://transomrepair.com/zk/
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  #3  
Old 08-28-2008, 10:56 PM
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If you do go with wood do not use CDX treated wood. There are to many voids and will trap moisture and rot sooner plus be weaker . A good ABX with epoxy sealer will do the trick if marine plywood can`t be found. Sealing with fiberglass is not recomended because it will absorb moisture and rot the wood.
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Old 08-28-2008, 11:37 PM
REW REW is online now
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Go with a full composite transom board. This will be the last transom board that you every have to put into your boat.

Don't use wood - it will just be a matter of time until it will rot and it will have to be replaced again.

Take care
REW
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  #5  
Old 08-29-2008, 04:41 AM
Brad1
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Put this in perspective. Your talking about an older aluminum boat. How long did the original transom last and what was the real cause of failure? Was it the fact that it was made out of wood? Hardly. The real problem was that it was allowed to get wet. Who ever installed it originally, or who ever drilled into it to install the motor or accessories, didn't properly seal it.

Wood is still the strongest material available. Some of the later model GLASS boats that use a non-wood core. make up for the strength factor by using additional layers of glass. You don't have that option with an older aluminum boat.

Here's a wood product that has a lifetime warranty against rot: http://www.greenwoodproducts.com/xlpanels.htm Many of the top builders are using that product in their boats today.

If you don't use the product I mentioned about, use marine grade plywood.

Regarding the seacast product, in order to use it, you need to have "pocket" to retain it. Many older aluminum boats do not have an inside liner or skin on the inboard side of the transom, and if same applies to your boat, your going to need to fabricate something to retain (hold in place) the poured seacast while it sets up. But why bother. Go with wood.
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  #6  
Old 08-30-2008, 09:02 PM
REW REW is online now
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Brad covered most of the points about using wood.
However, you might go a bit further.
Take your wood, and cut the transom board to size, using your old one as a pattern.
Then, drill all of the holes that need to be drilled in the wood, i.e. motor mounting holes, bracing brackets, mounting of the transom board itself.

Then, take the board out of the boat.

Now, take a good water proofing compound - immerse the board in the compound and let it sit for a week. This will allow the compound to completely waterproof the board, as well as the drilled holes etc.

Take out, and let dry for a week.
Now, go ahead and mount it in your boat. If you have an aluminum top cap - be sure to use a good marine calking compound spread liberally across the top of the board, before mounting the aluminum top.

If you have splash pan drain holes that are metal lined - be sure to use a good marine calk - to completly cover the wood, before installing the metal hole liners.

Bottom line - water will get to the wood in a boat.
If you don't want it to rot - you need to insure that there is a waterproofing or calking barrier between the water and the wood.

Take care
REW


p.s.
In past years, I have toured a couple of different aluminum boat companies, that had a very long guarentee on their boats and transoms.
The afore mentioned process was the exact system that they used in their new boat construction. i.e. cut out the wood, drill ALL holes, soak in waterproofing compound for a week, dry for a week, and then build the boat, using good calking in necessary areas.
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  #7  
Old 04-24-2014, 09:17 PM
1960 17ft uniflite 1960 17ft uniflite is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by REW View Post
Go with a full composite transom board. This will be the last transom board that you every have to put into your boat.

Don't use wood - it will just be a matter of time until it will rot and it will have to be replaced again.

Take care
REW
whats the name and supplyer of the composit board thanks for your help
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  #8  
Old 04-24-2014, 09:21 PM
1960 17ft uniflite 1960 17ft uniflite is offline
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Default composit transom board

greetings..my boat has a bad rotten wood transom...iam going to give it a shot at replacement........need name and supplyer of composit board thanks
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  #9  
Old 04-24-2014, 11:58 PM
roscoe33 roscoe33 is offline
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Welcome 17ft.

By definition, plywood is a composite.

I don't know a synthetic non-wood material to use, that is readily available.

Starboard is not an option.

Your best bet is a marine grade plywood, but pricey ($100) and difficult to get in many areas.

You could also use an MDX Ply, which has a resin coating bonded to either 1 or both sides.

Third best choice is plywood from AraucoPly.
Available at some of the big lumber yards and places like Lowes.

It is almost completely void free, strong, uses waterproof glues.
The 1/2" is 5 ply. $35-$39 a sheet.
The 3/4" is 7 ply. $59-$66 a sheet.

I have used it on several boat floor, and 2 transoms.

You will need to glue together as many layers as needed to match your transom thickness.

I use 2 or 3 coats of Spar Varnish to seal the wood. Do not use polyurethane.
Then it can be painted if desired.

Seal all holes and screw heads with 3m 5200 sealant. (permanent)
Seal the motor mounting holes with 3m 4200 sealant. (removable)

I have a 50 year old boat, and 2 40 year old boats, with their original wood transoms, still solid.
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  #10  
Old 04-25-2014, 10:51 AM
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T Mac T Mac is online now
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Wood is used in boat transoms for several reasons.
Here is a pretty good explanation by one boat repair facility

http://www.starboardmarineinc.com/Home/materials

I'd use wood (the right wood) if I were fixing your boat.

I know for a fact that Lund and Crestliner use "Marine - Treated wood". (no copper, no arsenic).
As for what other brands,--I have no idea what some of the other brands use for wood in their transoms.

Last edited by T Mac; 04-25-2014 at 04:44 PM.
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