Home   |  Message Board   |  Information   |  Classifieds   |  Features   |  Video
Wife not happpy with Lund lawsuit - Walleye Message Central
Walleye Message Central

Go Back   Walleye Message Central > Bone Orchard > WC Bone Yard

 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 12-08-2011, 09:26 PM
kaptinfish kaptinfish is offline
Minnow
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 1
Default Wife not happpy with Lund lawsuit

Hi everyone,
I have plans to purchase a new boat this spring and the wife has given me the green light. I have been talking a lot about Lunds boats and had my eye on a couple different models. She must listen more then I give her credit for because she showed me an article why I won't be getting a Lund. [URL="http://www.startribune.com/business/134853523.html"] http://www.startribune.com/business/134853523.html [/URL]
I am not sure whether this is a frivolous lawsuit or not? I was hoping someone here might work or have worked in one of the factories and could shed some light and help me convince the wife. Has anyone heard anything else about this lawsuit? Thanks in advance for any help.
Kaptinfish
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
  #2  
Old 12-08-2011, 10:00 PM
walleye.bill's Avatar
walleye.bill walleye.bill is offline
Keeper
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Nebraska
Posts: 489
Default

Have not heard anything of this and although it is unfortunate if true the quality of the boat is not affected by it.
  #3  
Old 12-08-2011, 10:07 PM
tugger tugger is offline
Wallhanger
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: East of Lake Ontario
Posts: 521
Default

The Federal Government telling you who and who you can't hire.
  #4  
Old 12-08-2011, 11:15 PM
T Mac's Avatar
T Mac T Mac is offline
Wallhanger
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Broadwater County, Montana.
Posts: 7,735
Default

"Kaptinfish".... first time poster. Welcome to the best walleye site in the business.

Yah...this news broke about 8 days ago.
I doubt anybody has much to add except conjecture, at this point.
  #5  
Old 12-09-2011, 04:11 AM
Rich S Rich S is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Nov 1999
Location: Oshkosh, WI, USA.
Posts: 1,377
Default

Wouldn't that just be more reason to buy a Lund...:D Sorry Juls
  #6  
Old 12-09-2011, 06:10 AM
manitobawalleye manitobawalleye is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: stonewall, manitoba, canada.
Posts: 881
Default

I would think the ratio's are no different at any other boat builder.
__________________
Roger Stearns
Stonewall, Manitoba, Canada.
  #7  
Old 12-09-2011, 06:33 AM
Shellback's Avatar
Shellback Shellback is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Nov 1999
Location: Wagontown, PA, USA.
Posts: 4,937
Default

Better start looking at other brands! Number 1 priority is to keep the spouse happy.
  #8  
Old 12-09-2011, 06:43 AM
chainwall's Avatar
chainwall chainwall is offline
Slot Fish
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Spring Grove, IL, USA.
Posts: 134
Default

I wouldn't jump to conclusions until the thing is settled. Could be a lot of lawyer speak right now.
  #9  
Old 12-09-2011, 08:24 AM
SC-1 SC-1 is offline
Minnow
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Minneapolis, MN, USA.
Posts: 38
Default

As a little background, I worked in the office at the Lund factory until 2007. The article in the Star Tribune (and the complaint itself) may have merit, it also may not have any merit. During the period of time that the article discusses turning away the number of women (starting in Jan 2006), the marine industry was starting to contract, employees were being let go. Just a few years earlier (2004-2005), the New York Mills plant itself was making 10,000 + boats a year, there were two shifts and talk of running a 3rd.

However, in just a few short years, the NYM plant was down to 1 shift (and this was after the Canadian Lund plant had closed and moved production down to NYM). Then in 2009 (a few years later), the Crestliner plant in Little Falls, MN closed down and that production eventually moved to NYM. So, what used to be 3 plants making aluminum boats had now been consolidated into one. The article (or the Labor Department's complaint) seems to be hanging on a stray statistic that 200 women applicants were turned down. However, it doesn't say anything about how many total applicants were turned down over this difficult period of time.

In addition, the entry level plant positions ususally went to go work in the 'assembly' department (at least it was while I was there). You should understand that while there is some automation in making a Lund boat, the process is still very labor intensive. The 'assembly' department is loud (due to riveting) and back-breaking work. Picture a worker underneath a boat holding a riveting buck while someone above you rivets hundreds of rivets into the hull for hours on end. The reverberating noise is almost unsustainable if it were not for double ear protection. This isn't to say that a female worker could not physically perform the work as there were some women working in that department. Back in the day, there was more employee turnover in this department simply because of the nature of the work involved.

I can't speak for current hiring practices, but while I was there, there were dozens of female workers who worked throughout the plant. If you can schedule some time to go to the Lund plant (now called the Brunswick NYM Plant), I would do that (and bring your wife along). Everyone who goes through that tour will appreciate the level of work and skill that goes into making a Lund boat. Along the tour, take notice of the women who do work there and work hard in providing fishermen a quality product.
  #10  
Old 12-09-2011, 08:32 AM
LLewellin's Avatar
LLewellin LLewellin is offline
Wallhanger
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Nevis, MN
Posts: 1,245
Default

[QUOTE=SC-1;1371789]As a little background, I worked in the office at the Lund factory until 2007. The article in the Star Tribune (and the complaint itself) may have merit, it also may not have any merit. During the period of time that the article discusses turning away the number of women (starting in Jan 2006), the marine industry was starting to contract, employees were being let go. Just a few years earlier (2004-2005), the New York Mills plant itself was making 10,000 + boats a year, there were two shifts and talk of running a 3rd.

However, in just a few short years, the NYM plant was down to 1 shift (and this was after the Canadian Lund plant had closed and moved production down to NYM). Then in 2009 (a few years later), the Crestliner plant in Little Falls, MN closed down and that production eventually moved to NYM. So, what used to be 3 plants making aluminum boats had now been consolidated into one. The article (or the Labor Department's complaint) seems to be hanging on a stray statistic that 200 women applicants were turned down. However, it doesn't say anything about how many total applicants were turned down over this difficult period of time.

In addition, the entry level plant positions ususally went to go work in the 'assembly' department (at least it was while I was there). You should understand that while there is some automation in making a Lund boat, the process is still very labor intensive. The 'assembly' department is loud (due to riveting) and back-breaking work. Picture a worker underneath a boat holding a riveting buck while someone above you rivets hundreds of rivets into the hull for hours on end. The reverberating noise is almost unsustainable if it were not for double ear protection. This isn't to say that a female worker could not physically perform the work as there were some women working in that department. Back in the day, there was more employee turnover in this department simply because of the nature of the work involved.

I can't speak for current hiring practices, but while I was there, there were dozens of female workers who worked throughout the plant. If you can schedule some time to go to the Lund plant (now called the Brunswick NYM Plant), I would do that (and bring your wife along). Everyone who goes through that tour will appreciate the level of work and skill that goes into making a Lund boat. Along the tour, take notice of the women who do work there and work hard in providing fishermen a quality product.[/QUOTE]

Very well said IMHO!

I went through the plant in 2008 before I purchased my first New Lund. I was very impressed and do recall quite a few women working through out. I then went down to talk to the main person, which was a women, for possible repairs for my boat that was in an accident and she was wonderful to work with. I think her name was Tammy but not sure. Since then I have talked to several customer parts service people that were women and they also have been great.
 

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is Off
Smilies are Off
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 06:10 AM.