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  #1  
Old 08-01-2013, 08:00 AM
walliseeu walliseeu is offline
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Default very low recoil deer gun

I am looking to take my daughter deer hunting this up coming Iowa youth season. She is on the small side and I am worried about the recoil. Does anyone have any suggestions on what I can do to get a very low slug gun!
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  #2  
Old 08-01-2013, 08:24 AM
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jerry1928 jerry1928 is offline
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Default No expert

I am no expert but I will weigh in on this topic. Slug guns can beat you up pretty bad, especially if you try sighting in at a sit-down bench. It is much better to stand up and let the recoil push you back on your heels. Of course a 20 ga will kick less than a 12. Also an automatic will be a heavier gun and some of the gas or recoil will be used to operate the action which extends the time of the recoil so it is not as sharp and is more of a push on your shoulder. There are also managed recoil slugs that advertise up to a 40% reduction in recoil. So I recommend a youth model 20 ga semi auto with managed recoil slugs. I would also recommend a rifled barrel for better accuracy.
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Old 08-01-2013, 10:28 AM
grizzley grizzley is offline
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Good advice in above post. Also: the sabot slugs seem to kick a lot less than regular slugs.
I think the 20 ga. semi. W/sabot slugs would be a good choice for her.
Although a little light, the .410 slug will also do the job, but I would take the 20 ga. over the .410.
If the shotgun purchased has screw in choke tubes, a rifled choke tube will also work pretty well.
I have a Browning A-bolt shotgun, with a 5" rifled choke tube. It will touch holes at 100 yd. with certain slugs.

Last edited by grizzley; 08-01-2013 at 10:42 AM.
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Old 08-01-2013, 10:48 AM
jigstop jigstop is offline
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A semi auto 20 gauge would be the lightest recoiling slug gun but it's still going to kick pretty good. Have you considered a muzzle loader? They can be loaded lighter for kids. This is just one of the reasons I hate shotgun only zones as slugs just plain kick hard and are not very condusive to kids shooting them.
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Old 08-01-2013, 11:00 AM
walliseeu walliseeu is offline
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yes I have considered a muzzle loader. Maybe 45 cal with light bullets 80 gr of powder sims recoil pad and weighted stock. I just wanted to see what others have used for their little ones I don't wanna scare her from going because of the recoil.
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Old 08-01-2013, 07:15 PM
Matt D Matt D is offline
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my daughter killed her first deer when she was 8 years old. she had been practicing with the 410 single shot and was having trouble with the trigger pull weight being very heavy. I found a youth model Remington 700 muzzleloader for her. We ended up using 40 grains of 777 with a 250 grain bullet. that first year we had a self imposed 20 yard limit and that was the distance she killed her buck at. It went <35 yards and was dead. Spent time last year at the range and feel confident we had plenty to kill out to 40 yards with it. Will be increasing the load up to 60 grains this year most likely since she has grown and expect that will give us 75 yards or so effective range. The other nice thing about this set up is it allows her to shoot with a scope and be much more accurate. SHe practices all year with the scoped 22 so making the switch to the muzzleloader is very simple and a non event.

Hopefully this gives you some ideas for your daughter. Best of luck to the both of you and I can tell you there will not be a better moment then that first harvest with her. I will never forget it and the first words she said was "I think my heart is going to jump out of my chest". Priceless!
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Old 08-07-2013, 08:44 AM
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Fin Bender Fin Bender is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by walliseeu View Post
She is on the small side and I am worried about the recoil. Does anyone have any suggestions on what I can do to get a very low slug gun!

Get managed recoil loads, that's exactly what your looking for. Have her shoot before the season so she's not afraid of the kick. Tell her about the kick before she shoots.

Your going about this right. There are idots out there who give their kids big guns let 'em shoot it. I've seen the videos posted on you-tube by those guys laughing at kids as they fall on their butts. I'd like to punch those guys right in the face.

Link to managed recoil loads:
http://www.gandermountain.com/modper...=view&i=415525
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Old 08-07-2013, 12:38 PM
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Bowtech84 Bowtech84 is offline
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I would look into a Rossi single shot 20 gauge, great functioning gun and not hard on the wallet or shoulder. You can also swap out barrels and as she grows as a hunter that comes in handy.
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Old 09-05-2013, 02:54 PM
NathanH NathanH is offline
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Is it possible to just train her in on a .22 and just go right to the big guy for the season. No fear of the recoil you get from shooting the heavy load at the range. No one remembers the recoil after shooting a deer.
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Old 09-11-2013, 07:00 AM
Papascott Papascott is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NathanH View Post
Is it possible to just train her in on a .22 and just go right to the big guy for the season. No fear of the recoil you get from shooting the heavy load at the range. No one remembers the recoil after shooting a deer.
I did similar with my son when he was 10. We practiced with a 22 with a red dot. I like the red dot with NO eye relief a lot better than a scope for youth or beginning hunters. Target acquisition is much easier for them.

I did have my son shoot his 20ga. Super bantam 3 times to make sure he knew what it felt like and to be sure it fit him good.

When a youngster has their 1st deer in their sights, the last thing their thinking about is recoil!
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