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  #1  
Old 04-25-2003, 11:49 AM
Gary IND
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Default Floating Jigs

Has anybody ever used floating jigs and if so how do fish them. I read a story in a magazine and the author said he used floating jigs on Walleye and they are effective...he just didnt say how he used them...thanks.
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  #2  
Old 04-25-2003, 12:16 PM
T-Mac
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Default RE: Floating Jigs

Use as you would a Lindy rig. Use the floater instead of just a hook. Great results at times, particularly with nice sized leeches. Great for the dead rod, too.
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  #3  
Old 04-25-2003, 01:21 PM
Dave Dave is offline
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Default RE: Floating Jigs

Ditto, T-Mac. I would not leave home without them. The soft floaters (Northland?)seem to last longer vs. the round heads that crumble like aspirin when you land a walleye by grabbing the jig.
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  #4  
Old 04-25-2003, 01:23 PM
Aaron-Indiana
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Default RE: Floating Jigs

I never go to Ontario without them. I've always tied a 1/4 weight about two feet from the floater and back trolled with it....usually tipped with a minnow or crawler.
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  #5  
Old 04-26-2003, 01:10 AM
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Backwater Eddy Backwater Eddy is offline
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Default RE: Floating Jigs

I use exclusively Phelps Tackle's floaters when I rig floating jig head options.

Phelps has several very good floating jig styles and sizes to work with and very durable. No wobbly or broken heads after a short use, like most Styrofoam floaters often do. The flexible paint finish will take some teeth too, and still work like new.

A new model floating jig Phelps has out, that I have grown especially fond of, is the Phelps "Spongy Bug". It is designed to be snag resistant and virtually weedless.

An added benefit of the Spongy Bug is they work extremely well when rigged barb-less. The Spongy Bug will hold live baits in place better then a barbed hook, even while worked through brush and weeds. A very nifty floating jig, for me nothing else comes close in fowling bait robbing cover conditions.

Well worth a hard look, see what you think.

Ed "Backwater Eddy" Carlson..><,sUMo,>
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  #6  
Old 04-26-2003, 06:15 AM
RW
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Default RE: Floating Jigs

You can fish floaters several different ways, but you need a weight to get them down to where the fish can see em. I've used rubber core weights, from water gremlin. This way you can adjust the the lenght of the line behind the weight. Sometimes you need to get the floater back five or six feet to get the bait where the fish can see it. I've also used chain bead sinkers or bottom bouncers. With these you need to figure out how long the line behind them needs to be. Experiment with the lenght. Don't just drag it along either. If trolling pull the rod forward once in awhile and let it drop back, this could trigger a fish to bite! If casting use a stop and go retrieve. The fish will tell you what they want, you just have to keep trying different things untill they tell what that is.

Can't ask'em, got to catch'em.
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  #7  
Old 04-26-2003, 04:06 PM
Stillwater Stillwater is offline
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Default RE: Floating Jigs

I read all the above replys and they are all good, so I would like to throw in a negative, just to balance things out.

I fish a lake near Walker, MN every year on the walleye opener and we always use lead-heads (1/16 to 1/4 tipped with a minnow, rainbow shiner/fathead). Bounced off the bottom.

Sometimes when things are slow, various members of our party have tried Lindy-rigging floating jigheads and the result has always been the same. You now catch every 12 to 18" hammerhandle in the area.

Every lake is probably a little different and you try what you like. But, on Boy Lake, if you'r not down on bottom, you are in hammerhandle turf. You might as well throw a small Daredevle out.

Scott




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