Home Grown Tackle:The Wonderful World of Jig's

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fishincrazy
12-05-2011, 05:24 AM
I see allot of people posting questions in regards to tackle use,choice of tackle,and actual construction of tackle.So I thought why not start a specific thread on specific tackle..........

So Here Goes.....................
I'd like to start talking about The Wonderful World Of Jig's!!!!!
If your a jig fisherman,someone who pours,paints and ties bucktails,or just constantly find a jig on the end of your line Post up!!!

Post your creations,favorite presentations,plastic trailers,scenarios for use...........ect..........

I'm no builder by any stretch but I dig Jig's!!!

Post up questions,pictures,and any comments you may have on the wonderful world of JIG fishing......

thanks for looking!!

Hey Folks heads up here this was for instructional purpose only no buying or selling is permitted by anyone on the WC forums!

THANKS!!
FC :thumbsup:

basscatcher89
12-05-2011, 07:58 AM
Great way to kill the cold months. We poured 400 ball head jigs in one weekend. I started out with an empty plano box and ended the weekend with a full sauger box ready for anything. I'm at work now but I'll have to post up some pictures of the main ones we did. They weren't anything special. I spend more time working on bass jigs than anything.

Wade B AKA: Ruger2506
12-05-2011, 09:32 AM
I found that store bought jigs were #1. Pure Junk (thin wire hooks, bad paint, etc) #2. to expensive and #3. both to expensive and cheaply built.

I have a friend who is a Gamakatsu Pro and he turned me on to their hooks. He makes his own jigs and has modified the mold with a Dremel Tool to add an extra "ring" to the collar of the jig to hold the plastics.

I take the raw jigs and powder paint them myself as well as tie my own hair jigs.

These things are AWESOME. My hook-ups have drastically improved. The paint stays on after a day of rocks and abuse. No more junk jigs coming back with bent/broken hooks and missing paint.

Also these are in a wide gap version which I really prefer. I was skeptical at first using a 3/0 and 4/0 wide gap hook but after a season of use let me tell you. WOW, I'm convinced.

The only down side is these hooks are sharp and hook EVERYTHING. So if you are in snaggy stuff, be prepared. However the extra strong wire allows me to usually pull my hooks free of whatever snag I've caught.

The white jigs are 3/8oz and you'll see the hooks aren't terrible bad comparatively but they still aren't great.

The orange/yellow jigs are 1/8oz. You'll see the hooks on the store bought versions are thin junk.

basscatcher89
12-05-2011, 10:20 AM
I might have to give those a look. I'm not a huge fan of the aberdeen 90* jig heads myself. I use to like using those max gap hooks.

Bill Krejca
12-05-2011, 10:39 AM
What can drive many of us to pour our own jigs is that the conventional wisdom (mindset) of the commercial world appears to be that fishermen need a larger hook as the weight increases; conversely that the hook size must be smaller as the weight decreases. I am led to believe this is a factor of manufacturing pour-ability /satisfactory yield, that it just results in larger batch usability (sell-ability).

I frequently prefer a large hook size on smaller, lighter heads, because smaller heads are not always used for small fish, but slower sinking is sometimes desired. To create even lighter heads with size 1- 3/0,4/0 hooks, I melt tin rather than lead. It works very well and the result is a light weight with a somewhat larger profile, and a slower sinking presentation. When fishing deeper water, I use a sinker 2' above the jig to get it down to the bottom, and awareness of same.

Some minor modification of a mold may be required to achieve the described desired end result.

Bill Krejca

maxxum
12-05-2011, 11:16 AM
Just started pouring my own last year. Mostly because of the price of jigs. I have one mold and am experimenting with paint.

AllenW
12-05-2011, 11:29 AM
Some like the thin hooks, many times when snagged you can just pull the hook straight and retrieve the jig, re bend the hook and your back fishing.

Might depend on line strength and what your fishing too.

I like longer shanked hooks like the Northland Shiner jig, unfortunately they're not made anymore (I believe) so I cast my own.

I'll use whatever good quality hooks I can fine with the longest shank, gamakatsu work, but so do several other brands I've tried.

Key is use a hook size to match the bait I'm planning on using.

Al

rebs
12-05-2011, 11:43 AM
I found that store bought jigs were #1. Pure Junk (thin wire hooks, bad paint, etc) #2. to expensive and #3. both to expensive and cheaply built.

I have a friend who is a Gamakatsu Pro and he turned me on to their hooks. He makes his own jigs and has modified the mold with a Dremel Tool to add an extra "ring" to the collar of the jig to hold the plastics.

I take the raw jigs and powder paint them myself as well as tie my own hair jigs.

These things are AWESOME. My hook-ups have drastically improved. The paint stays on after a day of rocks and abuse. No more junk jigs coming back with bent/broken hooks and missing paint.

Also these are in a wide gap version which I really prefer. I was skeptical at first using a 3/0 and 4/0 wide gap hook but after a season of use let me tell you. WOW, I'm convinced.

The only down side is these hooks are sharp and hook EVERYTHING. So if you are in snaggy stuff, be prepared. However the extra strong wire allows me to usually pull my hooks free of whatever snag I've caught.

The white jigs are 3/8oz and you'll see the hooks aren't terrible bad comparatively but they still aren't great.

The orange/yellow jigs are 1/8oz. You'll see the hooks on the store bought versions are thin junk.

Can these be made in 3/8th ounce ?

Wade B AKA: Ruger2506
12-05-2011, 01:48 PM
The white ones are 3/8oz. I do these is both 3/0 and 4/0 hooks.

locomoto
12-05-2011, 03:12 PM
Here's a typical flat head jig that I make for river fishing. This is 1/4oz. with a #1 Gamakatsu hook tied with Bucktail and some flash. The meat and potatoes is in the stinger. #12 Gamakatsu treble and 10lb AFW 7-strand stainless wire crimped with #0 sleeves and shrink tubed on the ends. That stainless wire is thinner than 10lb mono and tooth resistant as well.

fishincrazy
12-05-2011, 04:59 PM
Now This is what I'm talkin about!!! :raisin:

You guy's rock!!

FC :thumbsup:

jigngrub
12-05-2011, 07:15 PM
I do a lot of jigs! I pour and paint my own Cabelas Wobble Head in 1/8, 1/4, and 3/8,... 1/8 ball head... and 1/32 and 1/16 minnow head.

Wobble Jigs:

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v203/greencoachdog/DSC02173.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v203/greencoachdog/jigs002.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v203/greencoachdog/DSC01963.jpg

Minnow head:

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v203/greencoachdog/DSC02112.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v203/greencoachdog/DSC02075.jpg

Ball head:

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v203/greencoachdog/DSC02061.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v203/greencoachdog/DSC02077.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v203/greencoachdog/DSC02073.jpg

I use the Pro-tec powder paint, it's really great stuff after you learn how to use it.

fishincrazy
12-05-2011, 07:27 PM
I do a lot of jigs! I pour and paint my own Cabelas Wobble Head in 1/8, 1/4, and 3/8,... 1/8 ball head... and 1/32 and 1/16 minnow head.

Wobble Jigs:

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v203/greencoachdog/DSC02173.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v203/greencoachdog/jigs002.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v203/greencoachdog/DSC01963.jpg

Minnow head:

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v203/greencoachdog/DSC02112.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v203/greencoachdog/DSC02075.jpg

Ball head:

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v203/greencoachdog/DSC02061.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v203/greencoachdog/DSC02077.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v203/greencoachdog/DSC02073.jpg

I use the Pro-tec powder paint, it's really great stuff after you learn how to use it.

I've been looking into using the Pro Tec Powder.I notice you have 2 tone schemes how do you achieve that with the powder paint?Do you tape it off??I have a ton of lead to paint this winter and the Pro Tec looks like the way to go.That vinal paint is toxic but I can get 2 tone schemes out of it?

BTW your jig's look awesome,I've never used a wobble head they would be great with bass assassin on em!

SWEET!!!!!!

FC :thumbsup:

fishincrazy
12-05-2011, 07:30 PM
Great way to kill the cold months. We poured 400 ball head jigs in one weekend. I started out with an empty plano box and ended the weekend with a full sauger box ready for anything. I'm at work now but I'll have to post up some pictures of the main ones we did. They weren't anything special. I spend more time working on bass jigs than anything.

Nice I look forward to seeing your creations!!!Bet that plano box weighed a ton!

FC

fishincrazy
12-05-2011, 07:32 PM
I found that store bought jigs were #1. Pure Junk (thin wire hooks, bad paint, etc) #2. to expensive and #3. both to expensive and cheaply built.

I have a friend who is a Gamakatsu Pro and he turned me on to their hooks. He makes his own jigs and has modified the mold with a Dremel Tool to add an extra "ring" to the collar of the jig to hold the plastics.

I take the raw jigs and powder paint them myself as well as tie my own hair jigs.

These things are AWESOME. My hook-ups have drastically improved. The paint stays on after a day of rocks and abuse. No more junk jigs coming back with bent/broken hooks and missing paint.

Also these are in a wide gap version which I really prefer. I was skeptical at first using a 3/0 and 4/0 wide gap hook but after a season of use let me tell you. WOW, I'm convinced.

The only down side is these hooks are sharp and hook EVERYTHING. So if you are in snaggy stuff, be prepared. However the extra strong wire allows me to usually pull my hooks free of whatever snag I've caught.

The white jigs are 3/8oz and you'll see the hooks aren't terrible bad comparatively but they still aren't great.

The orange/yellow jigs are 1/8oz. You'll see the hooks on the store bought versions are thin junk.

That's a great idea!I never thought to use wide gap hooks,now are you using these to present live bait or plastic?

FC

Wade B AKA: Ruger2506
12-05-2011, 08:57 PM
That's a great idea!I never thought to use wide gap hooks,now are you using these to present live bait or plastic?

FC

I seldom use live bait. These do work for live bait but for the most part I run plastics with them. As you can imagine it is hard on the smaller minnows to run that hook through them.

fishincrazy
12-05-2011, 09:02 PM
I seldom use live bait. These do work for live bait but for the most part I run plastics with them. As you can imagine it is hard on the smaller minnows to run that hook through them.

Yea but on a nice 6-7" long leech it would work fine!!Believe it or not I've used small eels for eye's here on the Delaware river and a Wide gap 1/4 to 1/2 oz Jig with a wide gap would be the ticket with a 8-10" eel on.I usually have to weight em a little in deeper current.

NICE!!!!!

FC

Wade B AKA: Ruger2506
12-05-2011, 09:15 PM
Yea but on a nice 6-7" long leech it would work fine!!Believe it or not I've used small eels for eye's here on the Delaware river and a Wide gap 1/4 to 1/2 oz Jig with a wide gap would be the ticket with a 8-10" eel on.I usually have to weight em a little in deeper current.

NICE!!!!!

FC

That makes sense. Usually by "leech season" here I'm running 3-ways or trolling cranks.

jigngrub
12-05-2011, 09:20 PM
I've been looking into using the Pro Tec Powder.I notice you have 2 tone schemes how do you achieve that with the powder paint?Do you tape it off??I have a ton of lead to paint this winter and the Pro Tec looks like the way to go.That vinal paint is toxic but I can get 2 tone schemes out of it?

BTW your jig's look awesome,I've never used a wobble head they would be great with bass assassin on em!

SWEET!!!!!!

FC :thumbsup:

Some of the 2 tones are one color over the other, usually the darker color over the light one. Others are a white base coat and dip one side in one color, then the other side in a different color. Some overcoat colors will turn a different color, like blue over pink will turn purple. The colors with glitter in them are translucent so you can really get some good other colors by layering. Some other colors like black, and most of the fluorescent colors are opaque and won't let an under color show through. It is a lot of fun to experiment with and come up with your own custom colors.

Another reason I like the powder paint is that there is no fumes, vapors, or stench and you don't have to worry about stinking up the house... or getting a headache from toxic fumes.

Powder painting is pretty addictive to me, and I spends hours in the winter at my work bench just sitting quietly and painting painting painting... it keeps me out of trouble.

fishincrazy
12-05-2011, 09:29 PM
Some of the 2 tones are one color over the other, usually the darker color over the light one. Others are a white base coat and dip one side in one color, then the other side in a different color. Some overcoat colors will turn a different color, like blue over pink will turn purple. The colors with glitter in them are translucent so you can really get some good other colors by layering. Some other colors like black, and most of the fluorescent colors are opaque and won't let an under color show through. It is a lot of fun to experiment with and come up with your own custom colors.

Another reason I like the powder paint is that there is no fumes, vapors, or stench and you don't have to worry about stinking up the house... or getting a headache from toxic fumes.

Powder painting is pretty addictive to me, and I spends hours in the winter at my work bench just sitting quietly and painting painting painting... it keeps me out of trouble.

Yes the stench,ah that vinal paint really stinks!I'm gonna get some powder and try it out!Do you use one of those cups to dip?I'm not sure what there called but I've seen them online.The PVC thing with a fish tank aerator hooked into it?I just got some simple plans to build one.Now how do you cook your jigs?I've read that allot guy's use a toaster oven,cause I guess you can set the temperature?Or do you just use your home oven?

FC

jigngrub
12-06-2011, 06:44 AM
I actually use 2 toaster ovens, 1 to heat the jigs for the paint and the second to cure the paint. I use the cheap $20 ovens from wal-mart with and oven thermometer inside ($5). Toaster oven temp settings aren't very accurate and the thermometer is a must.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v203/greencoachdog/DSC02082.jpg

I can heat 40 or more jigs at a time for painting, this save a lot of time over heating the jigs one at a time with a heat gun or flame.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v203/greencoachdog/PB290020.jpg

I also know exactly what temperature my jig is when I stick it in the paint, this is very important because if your jig is too hot too much paint will stick to it and the paint will run and drip when you try to cure it. A lot of people have this problem and don't cure their jigs properly, this makes the paint brittle and it will chip and peel easily.

When a powder painted jig is cured properly you can hold it by the hook as high as you can reach and drop it on a concrete floor and the paint won't chip, the lead will dent but the paint won't chip. I test one or 2 of my jigs like this with every batch I paint.

I don't use a fluid bed, they're messy, waste paint, not all colors work with them, and you need to wear a dust mask when using one. Most people think the fluid beds work well because they keep the paint fluffy, but in reality they work well for those who use them because the air circulating through the paint cools down the overheated jig and doesn't let too much paint stick. Fluffing the paint in the jar is easy and only takes a couple of seconds to do.

The best temperature for applying paint to a jig is 325*. The paint will stick but won't melt and your jig will come out with a nice even coat like this:

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v203/greencoachdog/DSC02084-1.jpg

Notice how the hook eye is still open, if paint fills the hook eye solid your jig is too hot and you have too much paint on it... it will more than likely run and drip when you try to cure it.

After applying the paint I clean the hook eye thoroughly and then put it in the curing oven at 350*. The paint will then flash (melt) and the curing will begin. I cure everything (color) for 30 min. or longer @ 350*. Then you've got a good looking durable jig like the ones in my other pics.

If applying multiple coats, you need to cure between evey coat or the paint will run.

fishincrazy
12-06-2011, 06:52 AM
I actually use 2 toaster ovens, 1 to heat the jigs for the paint and the second to cure the paint. I use the cheap $20 ovens from wal-mart with and oven thermometer inside ($5). Toaster oven temp settings aren't very accurate and the thermometer is a must.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v203/greencoachdog/DSC02082.jpg

I can heat 40 or more jigs at a time for painting, this save a lot of time over heating the jigs one at a time with a heat gun or flame.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v203/greencoachdog/PB290020.jpg

I also know exactly what temperature my jig is when I stick it in the paint, this is very important because if your jig is too hot too much paint will stick to it and the paint will run and drip when you try to cure it. A lot of people have this problem and don't cure their jigs properly, this makes the paint brittle and it will chip and peel easily.

When a powder painted jig is cured properly you can hold it by the hook as high as you can reach and drop it on a concrete floor and the paint won't chip, the lead will dent but the paint won't chip. I test one or 2 of my jigs like this with every batch I paint.

I don't use a fluid bed, they're messy, waste paint, not all colors work with them, and you need to wear a dust mask when using one. Most people think the fluid beds work well because they keep the paint fluffy, but in reality they work well for those who use them because the air circulating through the paint cools down the overheated jig and doesn't let too much paint stick. Fluffing the paint in the jar is easy and only takes a couple of seconds to do.

The best temperature for applying paint to a jig is 325*. The paint will stick but won't melt and your jig will come out with a nice even coat like this:

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v203/greencoachdog/DSC02084-1.jpg

Notice how the hook eye is still open, if paint fills the hook eye solid your jig is too hot and you have too much paint on it... it will more than likely run and drip when you try to cure it.

After applying the paint I clean the hook eye thoroughly and then put it in the curing oven at 350*. The paint will then flash (melt) and the curing will begin. I cure everything (color) for 30 min. or longer @ 350*. Then you've got a good looking durable jig like the ones in my other pics.

If applying multiple coats, you need to cure between evey coat or the paint will run.

JG this is awesome!!!Exactly what I was looking to learn.Santa is going to bring me some toaster ovens for Christmas!!!

FC :thumbsup:

NathanH
12-06-2011, 10:32 AM
For folks making their own jigs. Have you ever figured out what the per Jig cost works out to be? If so I would be intrested to know. I know that other advantages of making your own jigs other then cost.

basscatcher89
12-06-2011, 10:46 AM
The startup cost is the most expensive part. If you use a Lee pot which is from 60 to a 100 depending on model and then the molds are usually 30 bucks a piece. If you know the right people you can get lead for nothing so all your into for your jigs once pouring is the jig hooks themselves. Which I think a box of jig hooks is about 3 to 4 bucks for 100. I'm lucky in that I just got out of racing and had hundreds of pounds of lead mounted to the car that is now "jig material" so I'm good on lead for awhile so jig hooks are the only things I need. It's something that can pay off in the long run but its definitly not something to get in just to save money. Once you catch your first fish on something you poured or built you get addicted and want to spend hours trying to figure out your next custom mouse trap.

Wade B AKA: Ruger2506
12-06-2011, 11:10 AM
For folks making their own jigs. Have you ever figured out what the per Jig cost works out to be? If so I would be intrested to know. I know that other advantages of making your own jigs other then cost.

I can't remember the exact number. However I know it was around $0.50 - $0.55 per jig. Hair jigs may kick that up to $0.60 - $0.65 per jig.

High end hair jigs go for around $1.50/jig.
B Fish N Tackle Precision jigs $0.95/jig
VMC Moon Eye jigs are $0.88 - $1.00/jig
Northland Gumball jigs approx $0.42/jig
Cabelas bulk jigs are approx $0.20 - $0.30/jig

So there are cheaper jigs options out there, but they live up to the "cheaper" label. Chipped pain and broken hooks.

jigngrub
12-06-2011, 12:36 PM
The last time I figured up my price per jig material only I think it was like $.20 a jig including paint. I could make them for half that if I used the cheap or free lead, but I don't.

Most of the cheapfree lead is either pure lead, lead/tin, lead/bismuth, or lead/tin/bismuth alloys. This stuff is soft and weak and won't hold up to rocks or being bumped around and the heads will loosen on the hook easily.

I use a high grade ballistic alloy lead of 92% lead, 6% antimony, and 2% tin. This stuff is hard as a rock. It is more difficult to pour with and requires a much higher temp. to melt than the other alloys, but I like the quality of my jigs made with it.

I buy it here:
http://www.rotometals.com/product-p/hardballbulletcastingalloy.htm

Don't even get me started about how much my jigs cost me when I figure in my labor!:D

fishincrazy
12-06-2011, 03:15 PM
For folks making their own jigs. Have you ever figured out what the per Jig cost works out to be? If so I would be intrested to know. I know that other advantages of making your own jigs other then cost.

Nathan that is a great question!Folks we have some experienced jig makers here let's pick their brains!

I have a question,when tying bucktails do you incorporate flashabu or other material?I know of guy's who tie saltwater jigs who use feathers for wider body profiles and less weight,do you tie with feathers for eye's??

FC

perchjerker
12-06-2011, 03:46 PM
For folks making their own jigs. Have you ever figured out what the per Jig cost works out to be? If so I would be intrested to know. I know that other advantages of making your own jigs other then cost.

I think the biggest advantage is I can make what I want when I need it. If there is a new hot color, I dont have to hunt around for it, they usually sell out or can be hard to find.

same goes for painting spoons and blades.

Wade B AKA: Ruger2506
12-06-2011, 04:09 PM
Nathan that is a great question!Folks we have some experienced jig makers here let's pick their brains!

I have a question,when tying bucktails do you incorporate flashabu or other material?I know of guy's who tie saltwater jigs who use feathers for wider body profiles and less weight,do you tie with feathers for eye's??

FC

I use strictly bucktail. Of course I hate the way feathers look/act. So I choose not to use them. I do add tinsel for flash.

Bigstorm
12-06-2011, 05:01 PM
As far as cost per jig, I get the lead for free (used tire wieghts) so I just pay fo rthe hook ($.07/ea average) and the paint (maybe a couple cents per jig).

I mainly make my own because of the satisfaction of catching fish on something I made.

Now, for the guys that make jigs with hair on them -how do you do that? Do you get the different color hair/tinsle from cabelas, and tie it to the jig with thread and glue it?

I would be very interested in trying to make some hair jigs

Wade B AKA: Ruger2506
12-06-2011, 05:11 PM
As far as cost per jig, I get the lead for free (used tire wieghts) so I just pay fo rthe hook ($.07/ea average) and the paint (maybe a couple cents per jig).

I mainly make my own because of the satisfaction of catching fish on something I made.

Now, for the guys that make jigs with hair on them -how do you do that? Do you get the different color hair/tinsle from cabelas, and tie it to the jig with thread and glue it?

I would be very interested in trying to make some hair jigs
How to tie hairjigs
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MRvlUYvnvOM

Bucktail
http://www.cabelas.com/product/Fishing/Fly-Fishing/Fly-Tying/Hair|/pc/104793480/c/104721480/sc/104340780/i/103888980/Deer-Bucktails/743914.uts?destination=%2Fcatalog%2Fbrowse%2Ffishi ng-fly-fishing-fly-tying-hair%2F_%2FN-1100436%2FNs-CATEGORY_SEQ_103888980%3FWTz_l%3DSBC%253BMMcat1047 93480%253Bcat104721480%253Bcat104340780&WTz_l=SBC%3BMMcat104793480%3Bcat104721480%3Bcat104 340780%3Bcat103888980

I try to mimic these jigs. As well as make my own combinations.
http://www.deanstacklebox.com/dressedjigs.html

locomoto
12-06-2011, 05:13 PM
I like to tie with bucktail and craft fur. I think the craft fur gives the best action when jigging. I used to tie with maribou but I'm not satisfied with feathers at all. When dry they seem like they'd have a nice action but in the water....not so much.

I get craft fur and bucktail from any of the tackle suppliers...Cabela's...Gander Mtn..etc.
I used to tie the dressing and then run some finger nail polish on the threads to secure it nicely. I have since given that up and just use a "whip finish" as the final securement.

Here's a video that takes you through the process. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C2SN3EjC6oc

fishincrazy
12-06-2011, 05:37 PM
Wow this is great!!!I've tied in the past and am just getting back into it again!I always used bucktail I was tying shad darts.The craft fur sound interesting Loco,Is that something you use in combo with the bucktail?I've fished marabou hair jigs for smallies in the winter under a bobber,learned this from In Fisherman years ago but I don't really use the marabou hair jigs for anything else.Keep it coming guy's this is really informative!!

FC :thumbsup:

fishincrazy
12-06-2011, 05:40 PM
I think the biggest advantage is I can make what I want when I need it. If there is a new hot color, I dont have to hunt around for it, they usually sell out or can be hard to find.

same goes for painting spoons and blades.

This makes the most sense!I don't know how many times I've gone to the B&T and couldn't find what I wanted :angry: If I did my own that would never happen!Just another reason to make your own!!!

FC

B.Chunks
12-06-2011, 06:27 PM
I didn't make them personally, but I did help design the scheme for my sponsor (un-named). Came out pretty nice!

Wade B AKA: Ruger2506
12-06-2011, 06:39 PM
I didn't make them personally, but I did help design the scheme for my sponsor (un-named). Came out pretty nice!

Very nicely done.

locomoto
12-06-2011, 07:36 PM
The craft fur sound interesting Loco,Is that something you use in combo with the bucktail?
FC :thumbsup:

I have never tied the craft fur with the bucktail but I suppose that would work. The craft fur is real fine and inexpensive. It's very consistent because it's synthetic. Bucktail is great too. However I find I use the soft hair up first and am left with a bunch of coarse bucktail hair.

On a side note...I'd like to make some "BIG JIGS" for Pike and Musky. I've caught a few big pike while vertical jigging and it's a real blast but it's a lot like going to a gun fight with a knife.

fishincrazy
12-06-2011, 07:51 PM
I have never tied the craft fur with the bucktail but I suppose that would work. The craft fur is real fine and inexpensive. It's very consistent because it's synthetic. Bucktail is great too. However I find I use the soft hair up first and am left with a bunch of coarse bucktail hair.

On a side note...I'd like to make some "BIG JIGS" for Pike and Musky. I've caught a few big pike while vertical jigging and it's a real blast but it's a lot like going to a gun fight with a knife.

I use big jig's for striped bass in the surf and in inlets along the jersey coast.I've used them up to 6oz's I'm sure they'd work for big toothy critters!!!What kind of stick would you use to handle them.I use a custom 9' Sabre Conventional rated 2-6oz with a Penn 965 spooled with 50ld PP.I find the big jig's work well with sparse hair in heavy current.The more hair the more buoyant they become.I like the hot lips or as we call em rip splitters.

FC

2XL
12-07-2011, 07:15 AM
I've been making my own jigs for the last 20+ years. I LOVE the fact you can make stuff you just can't buy comercialy.

Anyhow -
Cost, the intial set up is the most expensive step. I have a Lees Production Pot that holds 5 pounds of lead. It pours from a spout underneath the pot. I MUCH prefer that vs the smaller laddle type pot. That size is MORE than adequate for the do it yourselfer. Cost about 50 bucks. I am on my second one after 20 years so they do last!

Molds, I have about 25 molds. Most are DO-IT molds. As far as I am concerned DO-IT molds are the way to go. You are looking at about 30-35 bucks a mold unless you find one on Fee Bay ,Craigs list or at a garage sale. You can buy production molds or or a mold that makes multiple sized jigs. Go with the multiple sized jig molds unless you plan on making jigs for a LOT of people. I started out with a round head with barbed collar and can make jigs from 1/16th to 3/8 with the same mold. Check the DO-IT website as there are many options size wise with some of these molds.

Powder paint, The only way to go as far as I am concerned. About 5-6 bucks per 2 oz if I recall. Start with a couple of your favorite colors and go from there. 2 oz will paint a BUNCH of jigs! If I feel like it, I cure the jigs in a cheapo toaster oven for 15 mins or so. Truth be told , I don't do that too often as the river I fish eats jigs like popcorn so they generally don't last too long anyways. I heat my jigs with a small propane torch. (about 7 bucks) I prefer a lower flame =just so the flame comes to a point. You will have to figure out how long to heat each jig as it varies by weight. I heat a 1/4 oz jig about 4 seconds or a 4 count.

Jig Hooks, You have several options from cheapos to high enders like Gamakatsu, Owner ,Daiichi etc. but for the beginer there is nothing wrong with the Eagle Claw or Mustad offerings. In fact , I still use them myself from time to time. Mostly I have been using the MATZUO Sickle Bend hooks. They are about 55 bucks per 1000 - 8 bucks per hundred. Mustads and Eagle Claws are about $5.75 per hundred and about 45-50 bucks per 1000. These lower end hooks do all I want so I am fine using them.

Lead, You can go to your local scrap yard and buy lead. Last time I went (about 5 years ago) I think I paid 52 cents a pound for good clean soft lead. You want lead that when you press your fingernail into it it will leave a mark. I don't like using tire weights myself but you certainly can if you want. I just think the softer lead is easier to work with = more consistant.

Time, Some folks figure you need to figure a dollar value per hour of your time doing stuff like this. I don't as I really enjoy making my own stuff. With a little practice, you can EASILY from scratch make 50 plus jigs start to finish in an hour. Usually I'll pour a few hundred jigs and leave them unpainted. I will paint X amount in the color I want as I go along.

So, for about $110 or so you can set yourself up a nice little hobby.

Powder painting 2 or 3 tone jigs,
Start with your base color working from lighter colors to dark. I like jigs with a green/char base and a green or orange top. First I dip the jig in the base color -green/char. While the jig is still hot I have my second color ready to go. I take a small paint brush (Like you would use to paint a plastic model car etc) I dip that into the second color and with my forefinger lightly tap that color onto the top of the jig. It gives you a nice two tone jig once you get the process down. You have to be quick though as the jigs do cool fairly fast = the second color won't apply evenly. If that happens a couple seconds over the torch to reheat usually does the trick. If your jig gets too hot the paint will blister. If the bubbles are small, a couple swipes over the tourch usually fixes that. Sometimes the bubbles are too big so that method won't work. While the jig is still hot I wipe it on piece of cardboard or whatever just enough to remove the BAD part then redip the jig. It doesn't always work but with time and experience more often than not you can save it.

When heating plain jigs for painting I ALWAYS use a hemostat. If your any kind of fisherman you probably have a bazillion pairs of them laying around. LOL

Tying bucktails, I do that too and ALWAYS add about 10 strands of Crystal Flash or Flashabou. Not a lot but enough for a little sparkle.

Where to buy all this stuff,

There are a few GOOD suppliers out there. I use Janns Netcraft for the most part but have also used Barlows , Stephans and Terminal Tackle Company. Janns and Barlows have websites so if you are curious go check them out. Compare prices as one site can be cheaper than the other.

I painted up about 30 two toned jigs last night after fishing - took me about 15 mins = Piece of cake!
I would post some pics if I wasn't a computer idiot. LOL

Bottom line for me is (cost aside) you can make some killer stuff and there is nothing like catching fish on stuff YOU made!

Time to take those jigs I painted last night fishing ~~~~~ ><>

PS. Sorry for all the grammer malfunctions in this post ..... LOL

steverobinson
12-07-2011, 04:25 PM
anyone got an answer....spring walleye fishin on the reefs at LErie...1/2oz and heavier jig are needed many times due to the windy conditions...thises jigs are molded with large diameter hooks which tear the live shiner baits to pieced in short order.....was thinkin about getting a "Do It"mold and see if i could rig something up to use a lighter wt. hook that would have a shank long enough to work.....any idea's? thanks, steve

perchjerker
12-07-2011, 04:32 PM
anyone got an answer....spring walleye fishin on the reefs at LErie...1/2oz and heavier jig are needed many times due to the windy conditions...thises jigs are molded with large diameter hooks which tear the live shiner baits to pieced in short order.....was thinkin about getting a "Do It"mold and see if i could rig something up to use a lighter wt. hook that would have a shank long enough to work.....any idea's? thanks, steve


I dont see why you couldnt.

Heres a tip for modified molds.

Say you want to use a thinner hook that the mold takes and leaks out lead when you pour it

You can stop the leak with a small bit of modeling clay.

Clay is very handy when using molds

fishincrazy
12-07-2011, 04:39 PM
I dont see why you couldnt.

Heres a tip for modified molds.

Say you want to use a thinner hook that the mold takes and leaks out lead when you pour it

You can stop the leak with a small bit of modeling clay.

Clay is very handy when using molds

That is a great idea I guess before you set the hook in you'd add the clay then place the hook?

FC

perchjerker
12-07-2011, 05:19 PM
That is a great idea I guess before you set the hook in you'd add the clay then place the hook?

FC

yeah put clay in both halves of the mold, push the hook down into it and close the mold

Bill Krejca
12-07-2011, 08:05 PM
I dont see why you couldnt.

Heres a tip for modified molds.

Say you want to use a thinner hook that the mold takes and leaks out lead when you pour it

You can stop the leak with a small bit of modeling clay.

Clay is very handy when using molds

Another approach is to somewhat cool the molten lead on its way to the leakage portion. To prevent/limit leakage, I sort of swirl the lead into the mold by not pouring it directly into the hole, but onto the funnel part of the hole. Just providing a little bit longer path for the molten lead to follow can cause a small leak to fill.

Normally I would keep the mold hot for a good fill by pouring a continuous swath of lead on several other holes even though there is no hook in them. For the above procedure, I would only pour into the one hole, which can result in a slightly cooler mold.

Another method is to just use a harder lead - it will setup faster.

If all else fails, it is pretty easy to just trim off any leaked unwanted lead from the hook shank with wire cutters.

Bill Krejca

AllenW
12-08-2011, 07:10 AM
Another approach is to somewhat cool the molten lead on its way to the leakage portion. To prevent/limit leakage, I sort of swirl the lead into the mold by not pouring it directly into the hole, but onto the funnel part of the hole. Just providing a little bit longer path for the molten lead to follow can cause a small leak to fill.

Normally I would keep the mold hot for a good fill by pouring a continuous swath of lead on several other holes even though there is no hook in them. For the above procedure, I would only pour into the one hole, which can result in a slightly cooler mold.

Another method is to just use a harder lead - it will setup faster.

If all else fails, it is pretty easy to just trim off any leaked unwanted lead from the hook shank with wire cutters.

Bill Krejca

Wonder if any of the high temp solders would work, maybe a Sil-Fos type?
They melt at a pretty high temp, fill in and use a small round file to restore the groove.
Can't remember which may work though.

Possibly brazing might work too.

Wouldn't work if you used different sized shanks though.

Al

perchjerker
12-08-2011, 07:13 AM
Wonder if any of the high temp solders would work, maybe a Sil-Fos type?
They melt at a pretty high temp, fill in and use a small round file to restore the groove.
Can't remember which may work though.

Possibly brazing might work too.

Wouldn't work if you used different sized shanks though.

Al

clay is so much easier.

Hi temp silicone sealant works too

fishingfrenzy
12-08-2011, 08:28 AM
Love this thread! Can someone direct me to the URL of where I can purchase those stronger hooks?

locomoto
12-08-2011, 10:29 AM
http://lurepartsonline.com/ If I recall correctly they advertise right here on Walleye Central.

fishincrazy
12-08-2011, 01:28 PM
Love this thread! Can someone direct me to the URL of where I can purchase those stronger hooks?

Thanks Frenzy BTW love the Handle!!!:cool:

FC

walleyejim1216
12-09-2011, 03:13 PM
I pour alot of lead and you guys should seriously try the Matzuo sycle hook a try! It is by far the best hook I have ever used!

Wade B AKA: Ruger2506
12-09-2011, 03:19 PM
I pour alot of lead and you guys should seriously try the Matzuo sycle hook a try! It is by far the best hook I have ever used!

I'm not seeing "jig hooks" on their website.

locomoto
12-09-2011, 03:34 PM
I couldn't find them on their website either. They must make them though because I see they have their own jig heads that use the "Sickle" hook.

B.Chunks
12-09-2011, 05:03 PM
They are a pretty darn good hook!



http://www.cabelas.com/product/Matzuo-Red-Jig-Hooks-Per-100/739653.uts?Ntk=AllProducts&searchPath=%2Fcatalog%2Fsearch.cmd%3Fform_state%3D searchForm%26N%3D0%26fsch%3Dtrue%26Ntk%3DAllProduc ts%26Ntt%3Dsickle%2Bhook%26WTz_l%3DHeader%253BSear ch-All%2BProducts&Ntt=sickle+hook&WTz_l=Header%3BSearch-All+Products

patroller
12-09-2011, 05:51 PM
Barlows Tackle sells lots of brands of hooks in bulk and molds. They are called Sickle hooks.

SaugerSlayer
12-09-2011, 05:54 PM
just a couple hair jigs i made when i first started making them last year. take a look. BTW the orange and white hair jig POUNDS walleye and sauger on certain days, especially late spring/early summer.

Dabluz
12-10-2011, 01:19 AM
I am seriously thinking of making my own jigs too. The big problem with the jigs that I buy is the fact that I like the size of the hooks on the 3/8 ounce jigs but I like the weight of the 1/8 and 1/4 ounce jigs. Yes....I really like the hooks on the Sickle jigs because they are thin wire that penetrate real well into the walleye's mouth yet are flexible enough to straighten out enough when hooked on bottom. Most of my fishing is in a river that was used for floating logs and the bottom is littered with logs. I also use 6 lb mono on my spinning reel when fishing with jigs.

As it is now, I buy 1/4 ounce and 3/8 ounce Sickle jigs and add marabou feathers. I like marabou because it makes for a shorter jig with lots of action and i can add the head of a nightcrawler and not need to use a trailer hook which increases hang-ups on the bottom.

The first jigs I used was close to 50 years ago and they were marabou jigs. They revolutionized walleye fishing and are still the best walleye catchers I have ever used. I still have a few of those thin wire marabou jigs made by Allen's. I don't dare use the few that I still have.

For those who want to know what glue to use on the windings (hair or feathers), the best stuff is still fast drying laquer that you can buy at any fly tying shop in many colours. The best thread is Danvilles mono cord but I will try kevlar thread in the near future.

I have tried all kinds of plastic baits on my jigs and I have been far from satisfied of the results. On top of that, if I want to add some natural bait to increase the number of bites, I miss a lot of walleyes due to the fact that the hook point is not exposed enough to allow penetration beyond the barb.

Bill Krejca
12-11-2011, 01:11 PM
I am seriously thinking of making my own jigs too. The big problem with the jigs that I buy is the fact that I like the size of the hooks on the 3/8 ounce jigs but I like the weight of the 1/8 and 1/4 ounce jigs. Yes....I really like the hooks on the Sickle jigs because they are thin wire that penetrate real well into the walleye's mouth yet are flexible enough to straighten out enough when hooked on bottom. Most of my fishing is in a river that was used for floating logs and the bottom is littered with logs. I also use 6 lb mono on my spinning reel when fishing with jigs.

As it is now, I buy 1/4 ounce and 3/8 ounce Sickle jigs and add marabou feathers. I like marabou because it makes for a shorter jig with lots of action and i can add the head of a nightcrawler and not need to use a trailer hook which increases hang-ups on the bottom.

The first jigs I used was close to 50 years ago and they were marabou jigs. They revolutionized walleye fishing and are still the best walleye catchers I have ever used. I still have a few of those thin wire marabou jigs made by Allen's. I don't dare use the few that I still have.

For those who want to know what glue to use on the windings (hair or feathers), the best stuff is still fast drying laquer that you can buy at any fly tying shop in many colours. The best thread is Danvilles mono cord but I will try kevlar thread in the near future.

I have tried all kinds of plastic baits on my jigs and I have been far from satisfied of the results. On top of that, if I want to add some natural bait to increase the number of bites, I miss a lot of walleyes due to the fact that the hook point is not exposed enough to allow penetration beyond the barb.

Re: missing strikes - I mold a larger hook size than the mold recommends - up to 3/0 or 4/0, even with the smaller weights, i.e., 1/8 oz on up. Normally this will increase the hook sets substantially.


Bill Krejca

jigngrub
12-11-2011, 01:36 PM
I also use a larger size hook than recommended on the mold, you can usually move up one or two hook sizes without any problems.

fishingfrenzy
12-11-2011, 03:22 PM
To those using hair jigs, what are the benefits to using those compared to plain jig heads?

fishincrazy
12-12-2011, 04:40 AM
To those using hair jigs, what are the benefits to using those compared to plain jig heads?

I like the hair to add body profile and movement.Hair will pulsate out like a gill flair,it will add bulk to a presentation with a tail.

FC

2XL
12-12-2011, 08:34 AM
I don't tie a lot of hair on my jigs because I am only looking to add a touch of color vs bulking up my presentation. I always vertical jig hair jigs with a minnow and IMO too much hair ( traditional bucktails ) does not produce as well as the jigs I tie with less hair. I suppose it all depends on the body of water you fish but less is more on the river I fish.

I also use Hard as Nails clear finger nail polish to finish my hair jigs. Works well and dries fast. Give it a try, just be prepared for a few strange looks from the checkout girl. LOL

I like the Sickle hooks too but have had a quality issue with the last batch I bought. I bought 1000 red and 1000 bronze as they are getting harder to find. I tied up a bucktail with one of the new batch red hooks and had it break into 3 pieces after it got snagged up. I have never had one of these hooks fail on me like that before so I was very surprised. I hope it was fluke as it for sure is a quality issue with the manufacturer but now I am left wondering if this was a fluke or if there are more duds to come. Perhaps this is not an isolated incedent and that's why the Sickle hooks are getting harder to find?

B.Chunks
12-12-2011, 09:46 AM
I don't tie a lot of hair on my jigs because I am only looking to add a touch of color vs bulking up my presentation. I always vertical jig hair jigs with a minnow and IMO too much hair ( traditional bucktails ) does not produce as well as the jigs I tie with less hair. I suppose it all depends on the body of water you fish but less is more on the river I fish.

I also use Hard as Nails clear finger nail polish to finish my hair jigs. Works well and dries fast. Give it a try, just be prepared for a few strange looks from the checkout girl. LOL

I like the Sickle hooks too but have had a quality issue with the last batch I bought. I bought 1000 red and 1000 bronze as they are getting harder to find. I tied up a bucktail with one of the new batch red hooks and had it break into 3 pieces after it got snagged up. I have never had one of these hooks fail on me like that before so I was very surprised. I hope it was fluke as it for sure is a quality issue with the manufacturer but now I am left wondering if this was a fluke or if there are more duds to come. Perhaps this is not an isolated incedent and that's why the Sickle hooks are getting harder to find?

It's the anodizing process that makes red hooks brittle. I don't know if some of them are over-processed or what. It's not isolated to sickle hooks either. I've had red hooks of almost every brand and type break on me. Some real expensive Eagle Claws I bought one time were the worst. Snapped like a toothpick the first time you hung it up on something. Some batches of the same hooks are fine though. Some red hooks are just dipped in red lacquer, and I've never had a brittle issue with those, besides the red coming off easily.

Wade B AKA: Ruger2506
12-12-2011, 09:57 AM
Hair jigs provide a larger profile as well as some motion when fished. While the vertical jiggers may not like the hair jigs, I use a ton of hair jigs through out most of the season. Dragging jigs, pitching jigs to rip rap/wingdams and vertical jigging. Also I only use meat on my hair jigs maybe 40% of the time. Otherwise it's hair jigs fished on their own.

Here is a good video that explains some hair jig use.
http://www.idofishing.com/videos/viewvid.php/Number/649464/walleye-success-when-faced-with-over-abundant-forage

2XL
12-12-2011, 10:23 AM
Interesting BC. I figured there had to be some sort of fault in the hook making process that made them so brittle. I always thought the red hooks were colored with dye. Interesting to know that you have had dud red hooks with other brands too.
Does anodizing involve a heating process be it chemical or direct/indirect heat ? I have no clue but I could see too much heat changing a metals tempering = brittle hooks.

Until this last batch I never had a problem with the red sickles. One difference I did notice is one batch red hooks were made in Korea and the other made in China.

Wade , I only use hair jigs when vertical jigging and agree that many guys are missing the boat by not doing so. I rarely see other guys using them here and the ones that I do see using them are guys I know and for the most part are using jigs I made.
If I am casting I will toss plastics or cranks. Maybe I should start tossing some hair jigs just to see what happens.

Wade B AKA: Ruger2506
12-12-2011, 11:28 AM
Wade , I only use hair jigs when vertical jigging and agree that many guys are missing the boat by not doing so. I rarely see other guys using them here and the ones that I do see using them are guys I know and for the most part are using jigs I made.
If I am casting I will toss plastics or cranks. Maybe I should start tossing some hair jigs just to see what happens.

As someone who tosses a lot of cranks and plastics I would say yes, hairjigs are another great tool to have in your pocket. It's a plastic time of the year right now and I must say I do enjoy it.

Here are a few pics from yesterday.

It was the Cabelas cheapy bulk jigs with red hooks that really turned me off to production jigs and made me take up making my own. I broke many a red hooks, some on good fish.

2XL
12-12-2011, 12:45 PM
For sure anyone can make a better jig than the Cabelas production jigs. Last ones I bought from there the eye busted right off the jig when I tried opening it with my eye buster. Plus, I always hated clearing off a ton of excess paint from those eyes. Some of their 1/8 oz jigs are almost the same size as the 1/4 oz jigs I make due to all the paint they gob on their jigs. No thanks

Hair jigs seem to have been lost in the shuffle since plastics came out but they really are an over looked or at least an under utilized option by a lot of folks out there.

Nice fish! I visit IDO too and saw your report. Wish I lived closer to the Miss.

fishincrazy - Have you got your jig making , hair jig tying want list ready yet? You will spend millions (not really) by the time it's over but it's well worth it! LOL

Bill Krejca
12-12-2011, 01:00 PM
To those using hair jigs, what are the benefits to using those compared to plain jig heads?

- It shows the fish something that everyone else is probably not using.

- Pulsation when it is twitched.

- Slower sinking when allowed to drop, especially with a light head in cool water.

- A zillion color/material combinations.

- An excellent "sponge" for retaining scent that has been applied.

Bill

fishincrazy
12-12-2011, 01:43 PM
[quote=2XL;1372461]I don't tie a lot of hair on my jigs because I am only looking to add a touch of color vs bulking up my presentation. I always vertical jig hair jigs with a minnow and IMO too much hair ( traditional bucktails ) does not produce as well as the jigs I tie with less hair. I suppose it all depends on the body of water you fish but less is more on the river I fish.


I know there's sometimes I like a lot hair sometimes I don't.I carry scissors to trim out hair.But sometimes I want it to sink slowly so more hair slows it down.

FC

B.Chunks
12-12-2011, 02:17 PM
Interesting BC. I figured there had to be some sort of fault in the hook making process that made them so brittle. I always thought the red hooks were colored with dye. Interesting to know that you have had dud red hooks with other brands too.
Does anodizing involve a heating process be it chemical or direct/indirect heat ? I have no clue but I could see too much heat changing a metals tempering = brittle hooks.

Until this last batch I never had a problem with the red sickles. One difference I did notice is one batch red hooks were made in Korea and the other made in China.

Wade , I only use hair jigs when vertical jigging and agree that many guys are missing the boat by not doing so. I rarely see other guys using them here and the ones that I do see using them are guys I know and for the most part are using jigs I made.
If I am casting I will toss plastics or cranks. Maybe I should start tossing some hair jigs just to see what happens.

I don't know a heck of allot about it, but I don't think heat is involved. It's an electrical/electrolysis process. Allot of good black or bronze hooks are anodized, like Gamakatzu's, but something about the red leaves them brittle.

Dabluz
12-13-2011, 12:17 AM
To those using hair jigs, what are the benefits to using those compared to plain jig heads?


First of all and maybe the most important, you get a lot of action without all the length. The action of the hair or feathers starts just behind the head of the jig while the action from a plastic grub starts behind the bend of the hook. No need for trailer hooks because there aren't going to be any short strikes.

For a really short jig....nothing better than marabou feathers. They pulsate even when the jig is immobile in the water.

Second; you can add meat to the hook (which is bare) and still have all that action close to the head of the jig. The bare hook will not be overloaded which is not the case when there is a plastic grub or minnow already on the hook.

The reason hair and/or feather jigs became scarce is because they are a lot more expensive due to the fact that they are tied by hand. There was a time when jigs only came with hair or feathers but plastic baits can be made at a fantastic rate of speed.

For those who do not want to melt lead, you can buy plain jigs and simply add feathers or hair. It takes only a handful of small fly tying tools for a total cost of under 50 dollars (this includes the vise). Hair, feathers, flash, chenille etc are very inexpensive. The best glue is fly tying lacquer that you can get in many colours. It soaks into the tying thread yet dries quickly.

fishincrazy
12-13-2011, 06:50 AM
First of all and maybe the most important, you get a lot of action without all the length. The action of the hair or feathers starts just behind the head of the jig while the action from a plastic grub starts behind the bend of the hook. No need for trailer hooks because there aren't going to be any short strikes.

For a really short jig....nothing better than marabou feathers. They pulsate even when the jig is immobile in the water.

Second; you can add meat to the hook (which is bare) and still have all that action close to the head of the jig. The bare hook will not be overloaded which is not the case when there is a plastic grub or minnow already on the hook.

The reason hair and/or feather jigs became scarce is because they are a lot more expensive due to the fact that they are tied by hand. There was a time when jigs only came with hair or feathers but plastic baits can be made at a fantastic rate of speed.

For those who do not want to melt lead, you can buy plain jigs and simply add feathers or hair. It takes only a handful of small fly tying tools for a total cost of under 50 dollars (this includes the vise). Hair, feathers, flash, chenille etc are very inexpensive. The best glue is fly tying lacquer that you can get in many colours. It soaks into the tying thread yet dries quickly.

Now this is fantastic!I'm actually in this boat I have a buddy who loves to pour lead,I don't so he makes em for me and I do the rest!I'm wondering DB could you post a list of the tools you need to tie bucktails and such?

Thanks FC :D

jigngrub
12-13-2011, 07:53 AM
Hair/feather and plastic trailers all have their time and place.

Hair/feather jigs are great for stationary vertical jigging but aren't very useful for trolling. This is where plastics like curl tail grubs and paddle tail shads really shine, you just can't beat the flapping tails of the plastics for life like tail flapping action.

The Hook Debate

I've never had a problem with quality hooks breaking, I have had problems with cheap hooks breaking.

Sickle Hooks

Sickle hooks are great for open water with little or no snags, but their design with the sharp angle bends make them prone to breaking instead of bending.

Wire Hooks

Wire hooks like the Eagle Claw 570 and 575 are designed to bend when snagged so you can pull your jig free. Just a quick rebend with the pliers and you're back to fishing.

Colored Hooks

I use lots of colored hooks, red, chartreuse, crawfish, gold, and bronze. I've never had a problem with one color breaking more than another, as a matter of fact I don't have a problem with my hooks breaking because I use quality hooks.

If you're having a problem with hook breaking you may be overheating them during the pouring or painting processes, this will take the tempering out and cause the hook to become brittle.

Bill Krejca
12-13-2011, 08:47 AM
Re: hook breaking - In the past, I have had some problem with tin plated hooks. They would break when hung up with the slightest pull. I assumed that somewhere in the plating process the hooks got overcooked, causing them to become brittle. I haven't used any since.


Bill

SaugerSlayer
12-13-2011, 09:39 AM
i always use mustad hooks. they are sharp, durable, and a good price.

B.Chunks
12-13-2011, 10:20 AM
Hair/feather and plastic trailers all have their time and place.

Hair/feather jigs are great for stationary vertical jigging but aren't very useful for trolling. This is where plastics like curl tail grubs and paddle tail shads really shine, you just can't beat the flapping tails of the plastics for life like tail flapping action.

The Hook Debate

I've never had a problem with quality hooks breaking, I have had problems with cheap hooks breaking.

Sickle Hooks

Sickle hooks are great for open water with little or no snags, but their design with the sharp angle bends make them prone to breaking instead of bending.

Wire Hooks

Wire hooks like the Eagle Claw 570 and 575 are designed to bend when snagged so you can pull your jig free. Just a quick rebend with the pliers and you're back to fishing.

Colored Hooks

I use lots of colored hooks, red, chartreuse, crawfish, gold, and bronze. I've never had a problem with one color breaking more than another, as a matter of fact I don't have a problem with my hooks breaking because I use quality hooks.

If you're having a problem with hook breaking you may be overheating them during the pouring or painting processes, this will take the tempering out and cause the hook to become brittle.

I wouldn't call Eagle Lazer 3X hooks a non-quality hook. I've had the problem with more than just red jig hooks. I've had the issue with trebles, octopus, and rigging hooks for tubes. No heat involved with any of those. I have a bunch of Mustad red hooks of various styles that are painted, not anodized, and those have never given me any trouble at all.

SaugerSlayer
12-13-2011, 03:03 PM
heres what i made today. its really hard to get a good looking firetiger pattern with powder paint. not perfect but i guarantee it will catch em.

Wade B AKA: Ruger2506
12-13-2011, 03:31 PM
heres what i made today. its really hard to get a good looking firetiger pattern with powder paint. not perfect but i guarantee it will catch em.

Awesome. Did you use an air brush to spray on the black lines?

fishincrazy
12-13-2011, 03:36 PM
heres what i made today. its really hard to get a good looking firetiger pattern with powder paint. not perfect but i guarantee it will catch em.


Now this is totally creative!!Thinkin out side the box!!
AWESOME!!! :raisin:


FC

perchjerker
12-13-2011, 03:41 PM
I have some tricks for powder paint

that can be a thread of its own!

heres a few blade baits I did

SaugerSlayer
12-13-2011, 04:18 PM
i used a sharpie marker on the hair for the stripes believe it or not. it doesn't come off in the water. for the jig head i used powder paint. perchjerker, what is your technique for your firetiger pattern?

fishincrazy
12-13-2011, 04:27 PM
I have some tricks for powder paint

that can be a thread of its own!

heres a few blade baits I did

Now these are awesome!!

FC :thumbsup:

fishingfrenzy
12-13-2011, 04:59 PM
Let's hear those tricks!

perchjerker
12-13-2011, 05:10 PM
one tip is for doing details like the black lines is use a felt tip pen.

After it dries, go over the lure with a coat or 3 of clearcoat powder.

You can use a paint pen too followed by the clear.

B.Chunks
12-13-2011, 06:07 PM
one tip is for doing details like the black lines is use a felt tip pen.

After it dries, go over the lure with a coat or 3 of clearcoat powder.

You can use a paint pen too followed by the clear.

Right on. #1 rule in airbrushing or powdercoating. Know when to put those tools down and use an alternative method!

perchjerker
12-13-2011, 06:28 PM
i used a sharpie marker on the hair for the stripes believe it or not. it doesn't come off in the water. for the jig head i used powder paint. perchjerker, what is your technique for your firetiger pattern?

first, a coat of white. then a coat of chart yellow. Both with an electrostatic gun.

then the chart green and yellow are applied with a powder paint airbrush,

then the black lines with a marker, followed by the clear.

I used to sell these, but they are too much work and I did not make anything on them.

So now I just do them for myself.

fishincrazy
12-13-2011, 07:20 PM
first, a coat of white. then a coat of chart yellow. Both with an electrostatic gun.

then the chart green and yellow are applied with a powder paint airbrush,

then the black lines with a marker, followed by the clear.

I used to sell these, but they are too much work and I did not make anything on them.

So now I just do them for myself.

Well there awesome I'm sure there's pleanty of guy's here who'
d love to you make some of these!Thanks for the walk through!!:bowdown:

This is going great!

FC

2XL
12-14-2011, 06:42 AM
Nice stuff guys and thanks for the tips!

RE: Sickle hooks
The river I fish most can be snag city (rocks and wood) and a big part of why I got into making my own jigs = the river eats a lot of them. The big draw with the sickle hooks for me was the fact that they did bend when pulled from snags. They were/are easy to bend back into shape and keep on fishing just like the Eagle Claws and Mustads. I've poured/used well over a thousand jigs using the sickle hooks the last few years and only ever had 2 break from snags and those 2 were from the last batch of red ones I bought. It just surprised me when it happend after so many jigs that didn't fail like that.

No doubt I would expect zero defects/failures with the higher priced jig hooks. If I made my stuff to sell I would use the higher quality hooks but the lower priced ones ( Eagle Claws,Mustads and Sikles ) do what I want for the most part = good enough for me.

SaugerSlayer
12-14-2011, 11:32 AM
wow i dint know they made a powder paint airbrush. i guess thats next on my list of stuff to buy. you could just use the airbrush to do the firetiger stripes then couldnt you?

perchjerker
12-14-2011, 11:45 AM
wow i dint know they made a powder paint airbrush. i guess thats next on my list of stuff to buy. you could just use the airbrush to do the firetiger stripes then couldnt you?

believe me I have tried lol

it just doesnt give it a fine line. its more like fogging it. Like the orange on the one with the black dots. And thats after a lot of practice.

the other thing about it is since its an airbrush, it blows air onto the surface and cools it pretty fast.

its just another tool in the arsenal. Has its plusses and minuses

basscatcher89
12-15-2011, 07:55 AM
Could you use a regular airbrush with just a bigger tip on it?

perchjerker
12-15-2011, 08:23 AM
Could you use a regular airbrush with just a bigger tip on it?

I dont know

fishincrazy
12-15-2011, 02:36 PM
Hey Perch do you have any other pictures of your work?I'm sure folks would love to see it!I for one would love it!!!

FC :thumbsup:

basscatcher89
12-20-2011, 10:07 AM
Anybody found a good way to mold their own hoop for a stinger hook into their molds? Ive been playing around trying to find a good material for it but not finding much.

locomoto
12-20-2011, 11:56 AM
Do-It Molds sells the inserts to do it. You'll have to modify your mold a little bit.

I think the #0 Stainless Wire Eye is the ticket.

#0 Insert (http://do-itmolds.com/shop/index.php?route=product/category&path=2_118)

jigngrub
12-20-2011, 02:52 PM
Anybody found a good way to mold their own hoop for a stinger hook into their molds? Ive been playing around trying to find a good material for it but not finding much.

You can buy that mold and inserts from Barlows:

http://www.barlowstackle.com/Do-It-Live-Bait-Jig-Mold-P188.aspx

fishincrazy
12-21-2011, 05:32 AM
I wonder does anyone modify their molds?I've seen jig's that look different and was just thinking if somebody here did that it'd be neat to see.

FC

perchjerker
12-21-2011, 06:43 AM
I wonder does anyone modify their molds?I've seen jig's that look different and was just thinking if somebody here did that it'd be neat to see.

FC

yes. I stated this earlier someplace.

Wade B AKA: Ruger2506
12-21-2011, 09:59 AM
yes. I stated this earlier someplace.

X2 A dremel tool makes a big difference.

perchjerker
12-21-2011, 10:31 AM
I have even made my own molds out of Bondo.

basscatcher89
12-21-2011, 10:49 AM
I have even made my own molds out of Bondo.


How do those molds hold up? Are they kinda like some of the soft plastic molds people make that wear out after a few pours and need to be re-done?

perchjerker
12-21-2011, 10:51 AM
How do those molds hold up? Are they kinda like some of the soft plastic molds people make that wear out after a few pours and need to be re-done?

they hold up ok. They last more than a few pours or it would not be worth the hassle

Durhams Water Putty works well too.

fishincrazy
12-21-2011, 12:40 PM
I have even made my own molds out of Bondo.

Now that is cool!Do you have a special way you do it?This is something I'd love to learn how to do.I guess I'm asking if you have a step by step for Mold building dummies!:D

FC

perchjerker
12-21-2011, 03:42 PM
Now that is cool!Do you have a special way you do it?This is something I'd love to learn how to do.I guess I'm asking if you have a step by step for Mold building dummies!:D

FC

I will come up with something that will help. No pics though. Havent done this in years.

There are instructions on the web if you search for them

fishincrazy
12-21-2011, 03:53 PM
I will come up with something that will help. No pics though. Havent done this in years.

There are instructions on the web if you search for them

OK thanks PJ!!!

FC

2XL
12-22-2011, 09:19 PM
I was wondering what you guys think about jigs with painted or applied eyes on them. Do you think eyes improve your odds of catching fish or not?
When casting jigs and plastic I don't think it matters but slower presentations ( like vertical jigging ) I don't think it hurts to have the added attraction. I don't paint/apply eyes on most of my jigs but usually do on jigs I'm going to tie bucktails with.

rdbalmer
12-22-2011, 11:23 PM
I was wondering what you guys think about jigs with painted or applied eyes on them. Do you think eyes improve your odds of catching fish or not?
When casting jigs and plastic I don't think it matters but slower presentations ( like vertical jigging ) I don't think it hurts to have the added attraction. I don't paint/apply eyes on most of my jigs but usually do on jigs I'm going to tie bucktails with.
I'm not sure if it really makes that big of a difference or not. I have caught an awful lot of walleyes on both. I have a tendency to put eyes on the majority of my jigs. I have painted them on and also used the stick on eyes. I have gone more to the stick on eyes lately. I always apply a coat of either clear finger nail polish or clear vinyl paint over the stick on eyes. I have had issues with them falling off if I don't. I guess I'd have to say the main reason I put eyes on them is because I prefer the way that they look. Rob

SaugerSlayer
12-23-2011, 10:51 PM
fishincrazy, didnt see the message you sent til just now. heres that picture you wanted me to post on here.

fishincrazy
12-24-2011, 07:59 AM
fishincrazy, didnt see the message you sent til just now. heres that picture you wanted me to post on here.

SWEET!!!!!!!

I really dig the stripes!I'm going to give the stripes a try this coming spring!!


FC :bowdown:

Nimstug
12-25-2011, 09:33 PM
I see there are a couple of weights of thread for tying. Any suggestions for weight of thread for hair and marabou jigs?

Thanks.

Nimstug

Dabluz
12-26-2011, 09:06 PM
I see there are a couple of weights of thread for tying. Any suggestions for weight of thread for hair and marabou jigs?

Thanks.

Nimstug

Actually, any size of thread works well. With thinner thread, you can use more winds to hold the materials in place. I like mono-cord because it ties flat and comes in many colours. Nylon thread is more elastic and this elasiticity insures that the materials stay in place. When making jigs for pike, I use kevlar thread because it is extremely strong however, it is not elastic so you can't allow any slack. Hard to say if the Kevlar thread is really useful, I haven't used it long enough to notice any difference.

fishincrazy
12-27-2011, 02:34 PM
Actually, any size of thread works well. With thinner thread, you can use more winds to hold the materials in place. I like mono-cord because it ties flat and comes in many colours. Nylon thread is more elastic and this elasiticity insures that the materials stay in place. When making jigs for pike, I use kevlar thread because it is extremely strong however, it is not elastic so you can't allow any slack. Hard to say if the Kevlar thread is really useful, I haven't used it long enough to notice any difference.

So have you ever tried using braid to tie???


FC :huh:

Dabluz
12-27-2011, 11:09 PM
So have you ever tried using braid to tie???


FC :huh:

No. I guess it could be done but I prefer a more elastic thread that will hold the material on the hook shank. With non-elastic thread, if just one turn of thread slips, the other turns will also get slack.

I forgot to say that I do not add the materials to the bare hook. I much prefer jigs that have a short length of lead on the shaft of the hook. This helps a lot in preventing the materials from turning on the hook. If the lead is too thick, I file it down a bit.

During the tying process, I add lacquer so that the windings are well soaked.

I will try to get some photos soon.....especially on the tool for making the knot on the windings. It's the same tool that is used for tying flies. There are a couple of varieties of tools for this job but the best one is a metal shaft about 5 inches long with another shaft about 3 inches long that is perpendicular to the main shaft. Both shafts have a little bend at their ends. With this tool, you can make your knot anywhere on the shaft of the hook. Half hitch knots do work good but you have to make at least 4 or 5 of them and even then they sometimes come undone. The tool only costs about 4 dollars and can be used by left handers too.

fishincrazy
12-28-2011, 07:06 AM
No. I guess it could be done but I prefer a more elastic thread that will hold the material on the hook shank. With non-elastic thread, if just one turn of thread slips, the other turns will also get slack.

I forgot to say that I do not add the materials to the bare hook. I much prefer jigs that have a short length of lead on the shaft of the hook. This helps a lot in preventing the materials from turning on the hook. If the lead is too thick, I file it down a bit.

During the tying process, I add lacquer so that the windings are well soaked.

I will try to get some photos soon.....especially on the tool for making the knot on the windings. It's the same tool that is used for tying flies. There are a couple of varieties of tools for this job but the best one is a metal shaft about 5 inches long with another shaft about 3 inches long that is perpendicular to the main shaft. Both shafts have a little bend at their ends. With this tool, you can make your knot anywhere on the shaft of the hook. Half hitch knots do work good but you have to make at least 4 or 5 of them and even then they sometimes come undone. The tool only costs about 4 dollars and can be used by left handers too.

Great info DB!!!!I used to tie tails on shad darts and as I would add the hair I would use clear fingernail polish to soak my thread.I can't wait to see the pictures.

This leads me to an open question to all Jig makers please post any pictures of your tackle finished,and in process.I'm sure we'd all love to see them!

FC

fishingfrenzy
01-05-2012, 02:33 PM
Reinventing the wheel here. I saw once on Hunt for big Fish with Larry Dahlberg that he was jig fishing in the ocean with a lead body he had poured that was free from the hook. In essence, it was a jig, but the lead was free to slide up and down the line to where the hook was tied. He did this so that when he fights fish, the lead isn't attached to the hook to give the fish any leverage with head shakes. Is there any usable application with walleye vertical jigging? Clearly going winter stir crazy here. Thanks for any thoughts!

patroller
01-05-2012, 04:50 PM
Reinventing the wheel here. I saw once on Hunt for big Fish with Larry Dahlberg that he was jig fishing in the ocean with a lead body he had poured that was free from the hook. In essence, it was a jig, but the lead was free to slide up and down the line to where the hook was tied. He did this so that when he fights fish, the lead isn't attached to the hook to give the fish any leverage with head shakes. Is there any usable application with walleye vertical jigging? Clearly going winter stir crazy here. Thanks for any thoughts!

Wow it seems to make sense.

Seaark1660
01-05-2012, 09:05 PM
Actually, any size of thread works well. With thinner thread, you can use more winds to hold the materials in place. I like mono-cord because it ties flat and comes in many colours. Nylon thread is more elastic and this elasiticity insures that the materials stay in place. When making jigs for pike, I use kevlar thread because it is extremely strong however, it is not elastic so you can't allow any slack. Hard to say if the Kevlar thread is really useful, I haven't used it long enough to notice any difference.

I have used rod building thread with good results.Mostly size A.Had a lot leftover,so made use of it.

SaugerSlayer
01-05-2012, 09:51 PM
I always use Netcraft's "jig tying thread". thicker thread, but not too thick. it fills in really nice. heres what I do: put a layer of thread wrap on the jig collar to prevent hair from slipping, then tie your hair, then whip finish by hand. whip finishing by hand is so easy, it would almost be a waste to buy the tool. ive never had a thread wrap come apart. most of the time I use brush on glue to secure it, but in some cases I didnt put any adhesive on and it never unwrapped.

Bill Krejca
01-06-2012, 06:32 AM
In most of the situations I have encountered, the weight of the bobbin prevents the thread from unwrapping, thus I seldom use knot varieties, do finish with a whip finish, use either a mono loop with jigs, or a whip finish tool with flies. Waxed thread is used by most "fly tiers", as it serves the purpose of usually keeping the thread from unwrapping if/when slack is given to the wrap. A number of "purest" fly tiers prefer to not use a bobbin.

Since about 1946, when I first started tying, I have applied head cement (lacquer) to most every stage of the tying process. Nothing worse than having a creation start falling apart while it is being fished with, especially if the fish are nailing it like crazy!

Bill Krejca

AllenW
01-06-2012, 06:52 AM
Reinventing the wheel here. I saw once on Hunt for big Fish with Larry Dahlberg that he was jig fishing in the ocean with a lead body he had poured that was free from the hook. In essence, it was a jig, but the lead was free to slide up and down the line to where the hook was tied. He did this so that when he fights fish, the lead isn't attached to the hook to give the fish any leverage with head shakes. Is there any usable application with walleye vertical jigging? Clearly going winter stir crazy here. Thanks for any thoughts!

I don't think it'd make much difference with the smaller jigs, plus you usually don't get the high flying leaps with walleyes like you do with off shore fish...usually. :)

I didn't see his show but I'm betting his jigs were not 1/4oz or so, not as much weight swinging back and forth .. maybe??

What's a whip finish btw??
tia

Al

petewv
01-06-2012, 09:11 AM
Would it work to use nylon or cotton thread ,that is used for sewing clothing. Wife as tons of thread L.O.L.

SaugerSlayer
01-06-2012, 09:40 AM
Would it work to use nylon or cotton thread ,that is used for sewing clothing. Wife as tons of thread L.O.L.
I wouldnt use cotton thread as it tends to be very weak (the stuff ive seen anyway). The fly tying or jig tying thread is usually a denier material.

fishincrazy
01-06-2012, 11:10 AM
Reinventing the wheel here. I saw once on Hunt for big Fish with Larry Dahlberg that he was jig fishing in the ocean with a lead body he had poured that was free from the hook. In essence, it was a jig, but the lead was free to slide up and down the line to where the hook was tied. He did this so that when he fights fish, the lead isn't attached to the hook to give the fish any leverage with head shakes. Is there any usable application with walleye vertical jigging? Clearly going winter stir crazy here. Thanks for any thoughts!

We use jig's like these allot in the salt,they are especially effective flounder fishing.I can't see why they wouldn't work walleye fishing.I know for flounder they pick up the bait and don't feel the weight right away it helps on hook ups.I guess its allot like fishing with an egg sinker or any non fixed weight on your line.We also use jig's with a fixed head on a free hook.These also seem to work well with light biting fish.

FC

fishingfrenzy
01-06-2012, 11:32 AM
Swing hooks, correct?

fishincrazy
01-06-2012, 03:42 PM
Swing hooks, correct?

Yep!They are all the rage for flounder fishing.

FC

Bill Krejca
01-06-2012, 05:15 PM
I don't think it'd make much difference with the smaller jigs, plus you usually don't get the high flying leaps with walleyes like you do with off shore fish...usually. :)

I didn't see his show but I'm betting his jigs were not 1/4oz or so, not as much weight swinging back and forth .. maybe??

What's a whip finish btw??
tia

Al

Re: whip finish - the thread is wrapped over itself, then the tag end* is pulled out under the wraps, causing an effective tie-off. For jigs, when ready to tie off, I place a loop of monofilament alongside the wrap, then wrap over the loop 3-4 times. the thread is cut , leaving several inches, which is slipped into the loop. the loop is then pulled through under the wraps, pulling along the tag end of the cut thread. The tag is pulled tight, thread is trimmed, and a secure tie off is completed.

*tag end - the short end of the thread.

Bill

Bill Krejca
01-06-2012, 05:27 PM
Would it work to use nylon or cotton thread ,that is used for sewing clothing. Wife as tons of thread L.O.L.

Cotton or rayon, which is what most sewing thread is made of, will work. Disadvantages are that there is little stretch, unlike nylon and mono-thread thread types, which tend to hold the materials a little more securely. Cotton is also weaker than nylon, more apt to break when materials need to be cinched tight.

Cotton will eventually rot, rayon ages, I feel, faster than nylon. The sewing shops with which I am familiar around Cedar Rapids rarely carry nylon thread, however it works fine if it can be found, other than from fishing equipment retailers.

Bill

AllenW
01-06-2012, 06:26 PM
Re: whip finish - the thread is wrapped over itself, then the tag end* is pulled out under the wraps, causing an effective tie-off. For jigs, when ready to tie off, I place a loop of monofilament alongside the wrap, then wrap over the loop 3-4 times. the thread is cut , leaving several inches, which is slipped into the loop. the loop is then pulled through under the wraps, pulling along the tag end of the cut thread. The tag is pulled tight, thread is trimmed, and a secure tie off is completed.

*tag end - the short end of the thread.

Bill


Thanks, sounds like the tie used when putting eyelets on rod blanks.

Al

SaugerSlayer
01-06-2012, 06:33 PM
as far as thread goes, jig tying or fly tying thread is very inexpensive. plus they have just about every color you could possibly want. I buy all my thread through netcraft. Or if I need it right away I go to gander mountain and buy the thickest fly tying thread they have. its called 240 denier. the thinner stuff likes to break from the spool tension on the bobbin. If you want to learn how to whip finish by hand go here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WKnlD0MLrwM

2XL
01-07-2012, 08:27 AM
That's (U Tube vid ) simular to how I tie off my bucktails except I tie 3 separate half hitch knots before applying tough as nails to seal the deal ... so to speak.
Ditto on buying my thread from Netcraft = cheap and tons of colors to chose from if you want.

Bill Krejca
01-07-2012, 11:01 AM
Thanks, sounds like the tie used when putting eyelets on rod blanks.

Al

Yeah, same process as rod wrapping. For jigs, I make a closed loop out of monofilament and tie it to the top portion of my tying vise. When I want to finish off the jig, the loop is handy, and it doesn't get lost like when rod wrapping. The loop can be used for a long time, depending on lb test used; eventually, it becomes gnarled at the end, and is replaced with another one

Bill

Dabluz
01-08-2012, 12:31 PM
Yeah, same process as rod wrapping. For jigs, I make a closed loop out of monofilament and tie it to the top portion of my tying vise. When I want to finish off the jig, the loop is handy, and it doesn't get lost like when rod wrapping. The loop can be used for a long time, depending on lb test used; eventually, it becomes gnarled at the end, and is replaced with another one

Bill

There is a whip finisher that can do an excellent job anywhere on a hook or jig. On top of that, it's the least expensive and the easiest to use for lefties or righties. It comes in 2 or 3 sizes. I've been using it for many years in fly tying and adding hair or fur etc to jigs and treble hooks. It's a lot faster and less complicated than using a loop of mono or thread to make a whip finish.

Real soon, I will post a few pics of tools that are handy to use when tying jigs or flies.

You don't need a 150 dollar fly tying vise for decorating jigs with hair and other goodies. Even a 15 dollar vise will do the job but lets say that for a price of 30 to 50 dollars, there are excellent vises available. If it's for only decorating jigs, even a tiny mechanic's vise or small vise grip clamped to a table will do very well. The vise that I have been using these last 30 years only cost me about 30 dollars. Yes, it could be better at holding larger hooks or tiny hooks but I cope with it. I only make flies and jigs for my personal use and for making gifts for a few buddies.

Bill Krejca
01-08-2012, 12:52 PM
There is a whip finisher that can do an excellent job anywhere on a hook or jig. On top of that, it's the least expensive and the easiest to use for lefties or righties. It comes in 2 or 3 sizes. I've been using it for many years in fly tying and adding hair or fur etc to jigs and treble hooks. It's a lot faster and less complicated than using a loop of mono or thread to make a whip finish.

Real soon, I will post a few pics of tools that are handy to use when tying jigs or flies.

You don't need a 150 dollar fly tying vise for decorating jigs with hair and other goodies. Even a 15 dollar vise will do the job but lets say that for a price of 30 to 50 dollars, there are excellent vises available. If it's for only decorating jigs, even a tiny mechanic's vise or small vise grip clamped to a table will do very well. The vise that I have been using these last 30 years only cost me about 30 dollars. Yes, it could be better at holding larger hooks or tiny hooks but I cope with it. I only make flies and jigs for my personal use and for making gifts for a few buddies.

Yeah, I've got a whip finisher that I got from Herter's back around 1950. It works great for flies, but the upturned eye on jigs gets in the way, so I resorted to the loop for jigs. My metal whip finisher has a curved end sort of like a dentist's pick, and has a springed finger in the middle. Like many tools,etc, from Herter's, it was a copy of one made by Thompson, a very respected name in tying equipment at the time.

Bill

Dabluz
01-09-2012, 11:40 PM
Yeah, I've got a whip finisher that I got from Herter's back around 1950. It works great for flies, but the upturned eye on jigs gets in the way, so I resorted to the loop for jigs. My metal whip finisher has a curved end sort of like a dentist's pick, and has a springed finger in the middle. Like many tools,etc, from Herter's, it was a copy of one made by Thompson, a very respected name in tying equipment at the time.

Bill

Yes....I know that model or whip finisher. That was what I first used many years ago. Comes in either left hand or right hand model. Only works at the eye of a fly hook. I don't use that model anymore since the model I use now can make a whip finish anywhere on a hook or jig.

A whip finish is not extremely important. A few half hitch knots do pretty good as long as the thread windings are well soaked with lacquer.

Knot Tellin
01-10-2012, 04:56 AM
great thread

fishincrazy
01-10-2012, 07:18 AM
great thread


Thanks KT love the handle!!

FC :thumbsup:

bigbear40
01-10-2012, 08:01 AM
I have been pouring jigs for years out of an economic drive. I loose a lot of jigs. But besides the economic reason I really like catching walleye and crappie on jigs I have poured and tied. Just got a new do-it mold that pours a Northland Fireball style of jig with the metal eye for a stinger hook poured into the head. I think that when Do-it designed this mold they improved on the Northland design by putting sockets on the side of the head for stick on eyes. This is my first season using them jigging below the dams on the Mississippi and so far I am pleased with the results. Been out three times since the first of the year and have boated 11 walleye and sauger although they are running very small. Have been painting all jigs with powder paint now for 2 years and really like the results. I use a heat shrink tube heat gun which gets a lot hotter than a hair dryer. I preheat the jig for 5 to 10 seconds depending on the size of the jig and then just dip it in the powder quicklt and then flash it it the heat for a couple of seconds and I am done with it. Hang it on my drying container for 5 minutes and put them in the tackle box. Could not be easier.

fishincrazy
01-10-2012, 11:28 AM
I have been pouring jigs for years out of an economic drive. I loose a lot of jigs. But besides the economic reason I really like catching walleye and crappie on jigs I have poured and tied. Just got a new do-it mold that pours a Northland Fireball style of jig with the metal eye for a stinger hook poured into the head. I think that when Do-it designed this mold they improved on the Northland design by putting sockets on the side of the head for stick on eyes. This is my first season using them jigging below the dams on the Mississippi and so far I am pleased with the results. Been out three times since the first of the year and have boated 11 walleye and sauger although they are running very small. Have been painting all jigs with powder paint now for 2 years and really like the results. I use a heat shrink tube heat gun which gets a lot hotter than a hair dryer. I preheat the jig for 5 to 10 seconds depending on the size of the jig and then just dip it in the powder quicklt and then flash it it the heat for a couple of seconds and I am done with it. Hang it on my drying container for 5 minutes and put them in the tackle box. Could not be easier.


I'd love to see some of your work :thumbsup:,I'm also wondering if you have the # for that mold?That sounds like a great option.Do you tie em with bucktail? Do you tip em with plastic?Meat?Do you have a favorite color?Weight?

FC

petewv
01-11-2012, 05:36 PM
how do i color or dye the deer hair? i would like to try to make some hair jigs. i have the hooks and mold .

fishincrazy
01-11-2012, 07:37 PM
how do i color or dye the deer hair? i would like to try to make some hair jigs. i have the hooks and mold .

OK I haven't done it but asked and found these answers

First you need to prepare the tail:Clean it and remove the oils and let it dry
Take 1 cup Borax soap to 1 gallon of hot water

Soak the tails in this solution for a couple of hours then hang them to dry.

Once dry you follow these instructions:
I have been buying RIT dye in the powdered form at my grocery store for about $2.00 per box. In my local Shop Rite it comes in 8 or 10 colors.

In a 6 quart pot on the stove I add 2 cups of white vinegar, 1/2 cup salt and fill the rest 3/4 to the top with tap water. I bring the temp up to about 160 and add the dye packet. I then and my bucktails which have been presoaked in a bucket of tap water. I keep them submerged in the pot by using a heavy canned product like a big can of tomato juice.

I leave it in there for 30 mins trying to maintain the temp around 160. After the 30 mins I pull the tails, rinse them in cool tap water, and lay them out to dry. The color is almost identical to the color shown on the box. In particular the "Golden Yellow" is a killer mustardy/schoolbus yellow! The "Dark Green" is a cool color, and I have used the "Grey" as well. I have been doing 3 tails at a time. I'm not sure how many more you could dye in the same bath before the color is spent but for me, three at a time is good enough.

I also read that guy's use kool aide to dye em........

I hope someone else can post their method.

FC

Dabluz
01-12-2012, 03:25 AM
As far as cost per jig, I get the lead for free (used tire wieghts) so I just pay fo rthe hook ($.07/ea average) and the paint (maybe a couple cents per jig).

I mainly make my own because of the satisfaction of catching fish on something I made.

Now, for the guys that make jigs with hair on them -how do you do that? Do you get the different color hair/tinsle from cabelas, and tie it to the jig with thread and glue it?

I would be very interested in trying to make some hair jigs


Depending on the size of the jig, you buy hair according to the length of hair that you want to use. The most common is dyed calf tail. It's used a lot for streamers. It's quite fine and you can get it up to 3 or 4 inches long. Next is deer tail hair. Here you get a wide variety of lengths and it is dyed in all the colours imaginable. A good deer tail will cost about 4 or 5 dollars but will make hundreds of jigs. Deer hair from the body of the deer is hollow and much shorter. Not good for jigs. Then there is goat hair, bear, polar bear (expensive), squirrel tail, fox, etc etc. There is also artificial hair. This stuff can be very very long and does get tangled up if tied too long. The most common is called "Fish Hair". It's a good imitation for polar bear hair.

The way to apply hair to a jig: Place jig in a fly tying vise with the head to the left. Take your fly tying thread and wrap the part of the hook shank where the hair will be applied. Use close windings and cover the hook shank tightly. Apply lacquer to the windings and let the thread bobbin hang from the hook. Grab a small hank of hair that is on the skin of the animal. Start with about 1/2 the size of a pencil. Cut the hair close to the skin with scissors. You now have a clump of hair between the fingers of your left hand. Pull out the few hairs that are too long by slightly loosening your grip on the hank of hair. Now grab the middle of your hank of hair and pass an old comb through the base of the hank of hair in order to remove the hairs that are too short. You now have a clump of hair that is about all the same size. Yes, the clump is smaller. Grab the clump of hair at the base with your left hand. Line up the clump of hair above the shank of the hook that is already in your fly tying vise. This is where you choose the length of the hair in comparison with the hook length. Now, with a bit of switching from one hand to another, you should be grabbing your hair exactly where you plan to wind the thread in order to lash it to the top of the hook shank with your left hand. The head of the jig is to the left. Grab the tying thread that is already hanging from the hook shank and start winding it over the hair very close to your fingers. Ideally, you should bring up the thread between your thumb and the hook shank, then over the hair and then down the far side of the shank between your finger and the hook shank. Do not lose the grip on the hair. Do this 2 or 3 times and then pull the thread tight while allowing the hair to sit on top of the hook shank. You don't want the hair to slip around the shank. Add a bunch of winds with the thread and release your grip on the hair and apply lacquer to the windings. You can even make a couple of half hitches to keep things tight or just let the weight of the bobbin keep the thread in place. You can now cut the hair that extends forward of the windings. Next step is to rotate the vise 90 degrees or 180 degrees and do the same thing as before using another colour if you want. You can add a few wisps of flashabou at this point. Anyway, you use the exact same procedure for anything that you add to the hook shank.

Yes, you will break the thread at first but you will become familiar with the strength of the thread. The size of the clumps of hair or marabou or flashabou will also become familiar. If you are afraid that the thread windings will get too big, you can skip the half hitches and when it comes time to add another clump of material, you can unwind some thread just before applying your additional clump of hair. Tying flies, streamers, jigs....it's all the same technique of applying material to a hook shank without letting the material slip to each side of the hook shank. This is how you can get different colours to stand out and remain separated from each other. It's better to keep the clumps small because too much hair limits the movement of the hair when the jig is swimming.

petewv
01-12-2012, 06:26 AM
Tying hair jigs is all new to me . What can i use to make a thead bobbin to get started with? what would be some good colors for dark stained Ohio river water?

thinks for all the help and information. I need some thing to do this weekend for i think we will be snowed in . the weather ch. is saying we may get a inch of snow Saturday and the Temp. may dip to 20*.

Pete

2XL
01-12-2012, 07:29 AM
I would not mess with trying to make a bobbin. You will be better off buying a bobbin as they are pretty cheap. I have been using a Chase Bobbin I ordered from Netcraft years ago - cost 9 bucks. I also have a wire frame Griffin bobbin but prefer the Chase because it's easier to grip with my ape like hands. LOL I would also just buy bucktails in the colors you want. I looked into dying my own bucktails years ago and it was more hassle than it was worth to me.

Bill Krejca
01-12-2012, 08:03 AM
Tying hair jigs is all new to me . What can i use to make a thead bobbin to get started with? what would be some good colors for dark stained Ohio river water?

thinks for all the help and information. I need some thing to do this weekend for i think we will be snowed in . the weather ch. is saying we may get a inch of snow Saturday and the Temp. may dip to 20*.

Pete

Re: Bobbin - For the long haul, a purchased bobbin is the way to go. Most are fairly inexpensive and last a long time.

For this weekend, you might try just cutting a 2 ft or so piece of thread and adding a small weight to the end, to act as tension to prevent the wraps from coming loose. One item that works well is a hackle pliers, if you have one (you probably don't have it if you don't have a bobbin). Another trick is to use a very large split shot, or bullet type split sinker. Rather than cutting the thread, just squeeze the sinker onto the thread tight enough to hold, and slid it down occasionally as required. The spool can be just dropped on the floor, or placed on the floor in a small container such as a box or vitamin bottle.

Have fun.

Bill Krejca

fishincrazy
01-12-2012, 10:29 AM
Re: Bobbin - For the long haul, a purchased bobbin is the way to go. Most are fairly inexpensive and last a long time.

For this weekend, you might try just cutting a 2 ft or so piece of thread and adding a small weight to the end, to act as tension to prevent the wraps from coming loose. One item that works well is a hackle pliers, if you have one (you probably don't have it if you don't have a bobbin). Another trick is to use a very large split shot, or bullet type split sinker. Rather than cutting the thread, just squeeze the sinker onto the thread tight enough to hold, and slid it down occasionally as required. The spool can be just dropped on the floor, or placed on the floor in a small container such as a box or vitamin bottle.

Have fun.

Bill Krejca

Now that is some Home Grown advice there Bill!:bowdown:I hope this answered your question,I know it definitely sparked my interest I've got some jig heads in paint I think I'm gonna be tying some this weekend myself!!!!! NICE!

FC :D

petewv
01-13-2012, 10:32 AM
has any one tried useing Easter egg dye when useing deer hair , just a thought.

Drummondislander6596
01-13-2012, 11:56 AM
I borrowed a lee pot that pours from a spout underneath and it continually drips and/or leaks from the spout. I emptied it completely out and cleaned it up but it still leaks. Is there any remedy for this or should i just buy a new pot. (the spattering of molten lead on my hands is taking the fun out of this).
This is my first post so... Hello everybody and thanks in advance.

Dabluz
01-13-2012, 12:26 PM
how do i color or dye the deer hair? i would like to try to make some hair jigs. i have the hooks and mold .

No need to dye. I tried dying and the colours are not vivid enough anyway. The cost for dyed hair and marabou feathers is minimal. Having the hooks and molds is your biggest cost. The cost for fly tying tools is minimal too. You can get decent scissors, thread, bobbin, whip finisher, squeeze type lacquer bottle, 1 pint of lacquer, 1 pint of lacquer thinner.....all for under 5 dollars each.

Dabluz
01-13-2012, 12:29 PM
Re: Bobbin - For the long haul, a purchased bobbin is the way to go. Most are fairly inexpensive and last a long time.

For this weekend, you might try just cutting a 2 ft or so piece of thread and adding a small weight to the end, to act as tension to prevent the wraps from coming loose. One item that works well is a hackle pliers, if you have one (you probably don't have it if you don't have a bobbin). Another trick is to use a very large split shot, or bullet type split sinker. Rather than cutting the thread, just squeeze the sinker onto the thread tight enough to hold, and slid it down occasionally as required. The spool can be just dropped on the floor, or placed on the floor in a small container such as a box or vitamin bottle.

Have fun.

Bill Krejca

Too much of a hassle to do any of this. The best is a bobbin that holds the thread and you let the bobbin hang when you are not applying wraps of thread.

Dabluz
01-13-2012, 12:40 PM
I've been thinking about buying the equipment to make my own jigs but from what I can see, I will never be able to recover the cost of materials (molds, melter, paints, hooks, lead, accessories). On top of that, I am sure to make bad decisions or buy stuff I will never need or not meet my requirements.

What I would like to do, is buy jigs from someone here and just add hair and feathers. This way, I will encourage someone who already makes jigs and help him or her recuperate their costs.

I would like painted jig heads in 1/8, 3/16 and 1/4 ounce size....all with hooks found on the 3/8 ounce sized jigs. Yes, I would like good quality hooks like Gamakatsu or VMC and I would also like an eye for attaching a trailer hook.

As for the colours of the painted head....any colour will do as long as 75% of the jigs are black. The rest.....most definitely yellow then white.

Bill Krejca
01-13-2012, 12:43 PM
I borrowed a lee pot that pours from a spout underneath and it continually drips and/or leaks from the spout. I emptied it completely out and cleaned it up but it still leaks. Is there any remedy for this or should i just buy a new pot. (the spattering of molten lead on my hands is taking the fun out of this).
This is my first post so... Hello everybody and thanks in advance.

Welcome, Drum,

My similar problem with a Lee pot, from a number of years ago, seemed to be caused by the sometimes use of lead with an abnormal amount of impurities, which I allowed to form and sit in the bottom, causing a leakage which I never was able to fix, although trying drill bits, scrapers, etc. I finally went back to a hot pot. Perhaps if I had used better batches of lead.

In a related note: when I had to replace the internal element in my hot pot, it ended up not performing as well as the original, and burned out fairly quickly. For that reason, I bought a new hot pot with the heating element on the outside. It works very well.

Bill Krejca

scmelik
01-13-2012, 02:12 PM
last winter I started powder coating my own jigs and tied a few bucktails. Unfortunately I didn't get to fish much soft water this year so I never caught anything on any of the jigs I painted or tied, hopefully next year I will get out more.

Here is one of the patterns I did up.

fishincrazy
01-13-2012, 04:17 PM
last winter I started powder coating my own jigs and tied a few bucktails. Unfortunately I didn't get to fish much soft water this year so I never caught anything on any of the jigs I painted or tied, hopefully next year I will get out more.

Here is one of the patterns I did up.


I love the color!!How do you plan on fishing this?Will you use live bait or plastic?I also saw in your picture some crawler harnesses do you tie those as well?I look forward to seeing more of your work!

FC

scmelik
01-13-2012, 04:36 PM
I love the color!!How do you plan on fishing this?Will you use live bait or plastic?I also saw in your picture some crawler harnesses do you tie those as well?I look forward to seeing more of your work!

FC

I have some plastics that are the same color scheme which is why I decided to keep those colors going. Frankly I will fish them however the fish will bite them lol, if they want them clean I will fish it clean, with plastics, or with minnows or leeches it all depends on what the want.

I did tie up my own harnesses as well. Not a single one of those have been used yet, the guy that has the boat who I thought I was going to do a lot of fishing with this past summer decided to find a new fishing buddy so I lost the boat access.

fishincrazy
01-13-2012, 04:39 PM
I have some plastics that are the same color scheme which is why I decided to keep those colors going. Frankly I will fish them however the fish will bite them lol, if they want them clean I will fish it clean, with plastics, or with minnows or leeches it all depends on what the want.

I did tie up my own harnesses as well. Not a single one of those have been used yet, the guy that has the boat who I thought I was going to do a lot of fishing with this past summer decided to find a new fishing buddy so I lost the boat access.

Murphy's Law is alive and well in your world.I'd love to see some more of your work!

FC

2XL
01-14-2012, 05:57 AM
When I first got into jig making 20 +/- years ago one of the main reasons was to save money by making my own jigs. WRONG! LOL Instead it turned into a hobby of sorts that I really enjoy. I am fine with not recouping my investment as over the years I have whizzed away a ton of money on worse things. Things like beer rental for instance. LOL
Maybe you could find somebody to share the start up cost with you? They split the cost with you and you make them jigs as a pay back. I do that with my fising partner and it works out fine.


I've been thinking about buying the equipment to make my own jigs but from what I can see, I will never be able to recover the cost of materials (molds, melter, paints, hooks, lead, accessories). On top of that, I am sure to make bad decisions or buy stuff I will never need or not meet my requirements.

What I would like to do, is buy jigs from someone here and just add hair and feathers. This way, I will encourage someone who already makes jigs and help him or her recuperate their costs.

I would like painted jig heads in 1/8, 3/16 and 1/4 ounce size....all with hooks found on the 3/8 ounce sized jigs. Yes, I would like good quality hooks like Gamakatsu or VMC and I would also like an eye for attaching a trailer hook.

As for the colours of the painted head....any colour will do as long as 75% of the jigs are black. The rest.....most definitely yellow then white.

2XL
01-14-2012, 06:05 AM
I borrowed a lee pot that pours from a spout underneath and it continually drips and/or leaks from the spout. I emptied it completely out and cleaned it up but it still leaks. Is there any remedy for this or should i just buy a new pot. (the spattering of molten lead on my hands is taking the fun out of this).
This is my first post so... Hello everybody and thanks in advance.

If it is a LEE pot. Try twisting the metal plunger (for lack of a better term) back and forth a few times (when the lead is melted)to stop the drips. The plunger dealy that ataches to the handle (on top)and allows the lead to flow when you lift it should have a slot on the very top. Take a screw driver and twist the plunger back and forth a few times and that SHOULD stop the dripping. That is why the slot is ther in case you didn't know. My pot will drip from time to time and twisting the plunger stops it every time.

Bill Krejca
01-14-2012, 07:04 AM
If it is a LEE pot. Try twisting the metal plunger (for lack of a better term) back and forth a few times (when the lead is melted)to stop the drips. The plunger dealy that ataches to the handle (on top)and allows the lead to flow when you lift it should have a slot on the very top. Take a screw driver and twist the plunger back and forth a few times and that SHOULD stop the dripping. That is why the slot is ther in case you didn't know. My pot will drip from time to time and twisting the plunger stops it every time.

Re: plunger fix - that worked for a while with mine, but eventually it did not. That should definitely be tried, however, good point.


Bill

Drummer Boy
01-14-2012, 07:56 AM
Tying hair jigs is all new to me . What can i use to make a thread bobbin to get started with? what would be some good colors for dark stained Ohio river water?

thinks for all the help and information. I need some thing to do this weekend for i think we will be snowed in . the weather ch. is saying we may get a inch of snow Saturday and the Temp. may dip to 20*.

Pete

If you don't have a bobbin just take the end of the thread and put it through the hole in the spool.When you need more thread just lift the spool and unwind some more.I do this often when I want to use different colored thread then what I have on the bobbin.

fishincrazy
01-14-2012, 08:23 AM
If you don't have a bobbin just take the end of the thread and put it through the hole in the spool.When you need more thread just lift the spool and unwind some more.I do this often when I want to use different colored thread then what I have on the bobbin.

Well there you go this is an awesome idea!

Thanks DB!!!!

FC :thumbsup:

Drummondislander6596
01-14-2012, 08:48 AM
If it is a LEE pot. Try twisting the metal plunger (for lack of a better term) back and forth a few times (when the lead is melted)to stop the drips. The plunger dealy that ataches to the handle (on top)and allows the lead to flow when you lift it should have a slot on the very top. Take a screw driver and twist the plunger back and forth a few times and that SHOULD stop the dripping. That is why the slot is ther in case you didn't know. My pot will drip from time to time and twisting the plunger stops it every time.

Thanks, also to Bill K. I have done this and it continues to leak constantly. I think i will replace the pot. A couple of other questions- do you guys measure the temp of your lead or just use it when it is molten. What do you use to measure the temp. Do gate shears cut the sprew closer to the head than just using side cutters or wire nippers?

2XL
01-14-2012, 10:47 AM
Did you try poking something up the spout when the lead is still hot? You may have some crud lodged in there that won't allow the plunger to close off the flow. What I use is a straitend out paper clip and an old crusty pliers. Pinch the wire in the pliers then lift the plunger and stick the wire up the spout. Move it up and down a few times then see what happens. You should probably have something like that rigged up anyways as eventually the spout will become partlially blocked eventualy. You can tell when that happens when the lead stream narrows/goes to one side or notice reduced flow.You have to be careful though as you don't want molten lead splattering all over so wear leather gloves and make sure your pot is sitting on a piece of plywood so the spatters land on it vs your kitchen table or something nice. In addition - When pouring jigs I have a small cast iron cup that sits under the spout and out of the way of my molds. It catches any drips when the spout does not close or in case I over fill my mold. It works well when I stick the papaer clip up the spout to = it catches most of the melted lead that comes out.

Like Bill K said, it may just be time to buy a new pot.

JJ Scully
01-14-2012, 11:16 AM
Those of you having trouble with the pour spout, do you flux your lead to clean it? I use a ladle and the Lee precision melter so I don't have the bottom spout. My pot was getting really caked up with crud and looking into it I found out I should have been fluxing the lead.

patroller
01-14-2012, 11:56 AM
I always flux all my lead. I use regular candle wax. Whether I'm pouring lead from a cast pot or through my Lee I'm constantly shaving wax and adding it as I go. You have to be very careful for it will ignite and shoot flames up. There is an awful lot of smoke so I usually do it outside in the garage with doors and windows open, and a good fan doesn't hurt.Usually my Lee and my pot are completely clean when I'm done. If you clean your lead before you make ingots the less it needs fluxed when your making jig or sinkers.

JJ Scully
01-14-2012, 12:06 PM
I also use candle wax but I light the smoke with a propane torch. It then turns into a flame and there is alot less smoke. The flame can be 3 - 4 feet high depending on how much wax you add so be careful. Start small and you will learn how much wax you can put in.

SaugerSlayer
01-14-2012, 02:11 PM
ive heard of using wax, but i just skim the gross scummy crap off the top every so often. helps alot. to clean the spout i take a junk hook and shove it up there when its hot.

patroller
01-14-2012, 04:37 PM
Try using a long handled spoon and mixing the wax down into the pot. This will help keep the sides and bottom clean. One other thing is I've noticed that when the lead has been fluxed the jigs don't stick in the mold, it's seems that after a few pours the mold cavities even get slick.

drbrand
01-14-2012, 04:48 PM
I saw on another forum where someone mentioned using one of these air eraser guns for powder paint. Anyone had any experience with these. I might give it a try. http://www.harborfreight.com/air-eraser-kit-99636.html

kliph
01-14-2012, 07:22 PM
Here is what I made. Mold made from aluminum for 1 and 1 1/2 oz jigs.
The jig in the picture is 1 1/2 oz with a Mack’s Lure Smile Blade.

patroller
01-14-2012, 08:06 PM
Here is what I made. Mold made from aluminum for 1 and 1 1/2 oz jigs.
The jig in the picture is 1 1/2 oz with a Mack’s Lure Smile Blade.
Nice Mold!

fishincrazy
01-14-2012, 09:20 PM
Here is what I made. Mold made from aluminum for 1 and 1 1/2 oz jigs.
The jig in the picture is 1 1/2 oz with a Mack’s Lure Smile Blade.

Now that is Sweet!!!I like the offset lead head.Does that turn the bait up?How do you present this??Drag it,vertical jig it??

Very Nice Work I'd love to see more!!

FC

SaugerSlayer
01-14-2012, 09:29 PM
i would love to make a mold like that, but make it to produce jigging rapalas.

drbrand
01-17-2012, 07:34 PM
Looks like the last few days of posts have been removed. I posted this earlier today. I saw that Bass Pro.com has their DO-IT jig, sinker, etc molds for $29, which is less than the used ones go for on ebay. They also have a good price and selection on ProTec powder paints. I picked up a ultra minnow mold and some watermelon, june bug, and root beer glitter powder paint.

fishincrazy
01-17-2012, 08:30 PM
Looks like the last few days of posts have been removed. I posted this earlier today. I saw that Bass Pro.com has their DO-IT jig, sinker, etc molds for $29, which is less than the used ones go for on ebay. They also have a good price and selection on ProTec powder paints. I picked up a ultra minnow mold and some watermelon, june bug, and root beer glitter powder paint.

That's awesome I gotta check that out.It sucks but something happened to the site and I guess the last couple of day's had to be erased.

OH Well It is what it is!!!!

I've got some questions in regards to painting.I picked up some Pro Tec and a $20 toaster oven.I'm gonna be painting some jig's.I've never used this method before.I always used vinyl paint but thought I'd try this.Any tips would be appreciated!
I read in this thread a post by JigNGrub where he heats up his jigs to 324* in a toaster oven before he dips them.I'm wondering how do you get them out of the toaster oven and into the paint?I was looking at your pictures and can't figure this out.

Thanks Guy's

BTW if you have posts you made and there gone please re post them.

FC :howdy:

petewv
01-18-2012, 10:36 AM
Klip

how did you make a aluminum mold ? that is something

2XL
01-18-2012, 12:38 PM
Sounds like a new pot is the best option. They last a long time, I am on my second pot in 20 years.

I don't measure the temp on my pot. I have the LEE production pot. It has a heat setting knob on the top behind the pot. I set mine between 6 and 7 ( I use a soft lead) and the lead comes out just fine. You will have to experiment with the lead you use, too cool and the jigs will looked wrinkled,too hot and they will look like they have a light cating of frost on them. When I first started pouring jigs I cranked the temp on high. I don't know if itwas the lead , maybe an alloy mixed with the lead or what but the jigs came out frosted and brittle. Some of those jigs would just crumble, it was weird. I turned the heat down and had no more problems.

I use a gate shear as the regular side cutters I had at the time left too much of the sprue when I trimmed the jigs. Looking back, I imagine the side cutters I was using back then were too big for the job but the Gate shears work well on most of the things I pour. I use the smaller sized Gate shear. Some molds produce a funky sprue though so a metal file can be a handy tool to have on hand.

Hope this answered your Qs.




Thanks, also to Bill K. I have done this and it continues to leak constantly. I think i will replace the pot. A couple of other questions- do you guys measure the temp of your lead or just use it when it is molten. What do you use to measure the temp. Do gate shears cut the sprew closer to the head than just using side cutters or wire nippers?

2XL
01-18-2012, 12:45 PM
I use a small propane torch to heat my jigs. One pound propane cylinder and a cheapo propane torch you can get from the hardware store. A one pound propane bottle lasts a LONG time.

I use a toaster oven to cure the jigs after I have painted them. It would seem awkward using the oven to heat the jigs for painting but that's just me = all thumbs. LOL

I just hang the jigs for curing on the rack. The oven I have I turned the rack upside down which gives the jigs a little more clearance from the bottom of the oven.



That's awesome I gotta check that out.It sucks but something happened to the site and I guess the last couple of day's had to be erased.

OH Well It is what it is!!!!

I've got some questions in regards to painting.I picked up some Pro Tec and a $20 toaster oven.I'm gonna be painting some jig's.I've never used this method before.I always used vinyl paint but thought I'd try this.Any tips would be appreciated!
I read in this thread a post by JigNGrub where he heats up his jigs to 324* in a toaster oven before he dips them.I'm wondering how do you get them out of the toaster oven and into the paint?I was looking at your pictures and can't figure this out.

Thanks Guy's

BTW if you have posts you made and there gone please re post them.

FC :howdy:

fishincrazy
01-18-2012, 03:17 PM
I use a small propane torch to heat my jigs. One pound propane cylinder and a cheapo propane torch you can get from the hardware store. A one pound propane bottle lasts a LONG time.

I use a toaster oven to cure the jigs after I have painted them. It would seem awkward using the oven to heat the jigs for painting but that's just me = all thumbs. LOL

I just hang the jigs for curing on the rack. The oven I have I turned the rack upside down which gives the jigs a little more clearance from the bottom of the oven.

Thanks 2XL I have one of those small propane torches I was thinking about using to do the initial heating.

I have a bunch of old unpainted jigs which have been in my box for literally years.I was going to start by painting these before the new ones which where just poured.I was wondering if I should try to clean these old jig's first and what I should use to clean them?I thought rubbing alcohol would this do?

FC

patroller
01-18-2012, 06:45 PM
Thanks 2XL I have one of those small propane torches I was thinking about using to do the initial heating.

I have a bunch of old unpainted jigs which have been in my box for literally years.I was going to start by painting these before the new ones which where just poured.I was wondering if I should try to clean these old jig's first and what I should use to clean them?I thought rubbing alcohol would this do?

FC Thought about cleaning old vinyl paint off but never wanted to risk it, for my own safety:withstupid: I would make sure you check the hooks and make sure they are still OK. I even sharpen my often on the water anyway.Especially around rocks and wood.

fishincrazy
01-18-2012, 07:44 PM
Thought about cleaning old vinyl paint off but never wanted to risk it, for my own safety:withstupid: I would make sure you check the hooks and make sure they are still OK. I even sharpen my often on the water anyway.Especially around rocks and wood.

I'm not keeping anything that had vinal on it all the ones I have never had paint on them.I used eagle claw hooks for these so I gotta sharpen them :bigsmile:

Thanks for the help!!!SW PA I know a bunch of guy's in your neck of the woods who surf fish!!

FC :thumbsup:

fishincrazy
01-18-2012, 07:46 PM
Klip

how did you make a aluminum mold ? that is something

I've seen guy's make em with dremal tools.I would think a milling machine would be allot more accurate but you gotta know somebody who's got one.

FC

kliph
01-18-2012, 08:29 PM
I've seen guy's make em with dremal tools.I would think a milling machine would be allot more accurate but you gotta know somebody who's got one.

FC

That's close. Milling machine, EDM, Drill press.
I use 1/4 inch dowel pins. Square two sides and work off of that.
Lay it out so the shape and location are the same for both half's.
Here is a(2 oz) keel sinker I made.
PS. Check the the mold/die on the right.
That is an air vent next to the fill hole. Lets the air out.

fishincrazy
01-19-2012, 06:02 AM
That's close. Milling machine, EDM, Drill press.
I use 1/4 inch dowel pins. Square two sides and work off of that.
Lay it out so the shape and location are the same for both half's.
Here is a keel sinker I made.
PS. Check the the mold/die on the right.
That is an air vent next to the fill hole. Lets the air out.

That looks really COOL!!!!!I'd love to see more of your work!

FC :thumbsup:

2XL
01-19-2012, 06:53 AM
Thanks 2XL I have one of those small propane torches I was thinking about using to do the initial heating.

I have a bunch of old unpainted jigs which have been in my box for literally years.I was going to start by painting these before the new ones which where just poured.I was wondering if I should try to clean these old jig's first and what I should use to clean them?I thought rubbing alcohol would this do?

FC

When I start pouring jigs I usually make a pile of them in different weights, hook sizes and styles. I figure I might as well make a bunch while the pot is hot and I have the time so almost always have unpainted jigs ready for paint = some of those sit a long time. Some will get a dull color to them and I have even had some get a white finsih on them. Why? I don't know, but I never clean old jigs before painting them. That being said, If I think there might be a problem or the hook gets a little rusty I just remelt them or in some cases toss them. I used to remelt painted jigs ( ones that were chipped up or damaged etc ) but more often than not I just pitch them as it's really not worth the effort.

After you get going making your own you will see what I mean.

2XL
01-19-2012, 07:01 AM
Cool beans Kliph.
I made a mold out of a pice of 1x4 wood last year. I wanted to make a thin pencil sinker with a molded in barrel swivel on top. It took some messing around but I finally got functional sinkers. They look pretty bad finish wise but being a sinker I really didn't care too much about how they look.
BTW Hot lead + wood = smoke in case anyone was wondering. LOL

Bill Krejca
01-19-2012, 08:37 AM
Re: Molds.

- From wood - I've had good luck making pencil sinkers, which, although somewhat non-pretty, still work well. I take 2 pieces of 2 x 4, or whatever, perhaps 6" long,and clamp them together. Wood having sharp corners, rather than radiused corners is best. Using a drill press, I then drill into the crack between the pieces. I can produce almost any size sinker by changing the drill diameter, or depth, or both. The pieces should be clamped together before pouring. For a tie loop, I insert a piece of copper wire, twisted into the shape I want. A snap swivel can be attached to the protruding loop later, if desired.
In using a wooden mold, a certain amount of smoke will be produced when pouring. Eventually, the mold will burn itself into unusefulness, but a new can be easily made.

- From plaster of Paris, replicating an existing jig head - A mold can be made from powdered plaster and a mix of water. In this scenario, a small box, such as cardboard, or other material may be used. the box is smeared with Vaseline, to prevent sticking. The mix is poured into the box to a depth of perhaps 1/2". While the mix is setting up, insert the Vaseline (used to keep parts from sticking to each other) coated jig head model onto the top of the surface - head should be pushed down into the plaster to a depth of half way, hook should be laying in the same manner as in a normal mold.
After setting up, carefully remove the jig head, reapply Vaseline, and replace. The plaster surface should be coated with a thin layer of Vaseline, and fresh mix of plaster poured on it. After set up, the project can be removed from the box, and a new mold has been produced.
Several enhancements should be considered - 1)Coated very small diameter discard able wooden dowels inserted 1/2 way onto surface at first plaster pour, touching the mold edge and the jig head ensure a gas escape while pouring the lead. Plaster can be carefully drilled down later to achieve the same thing. 2)Several small wooden dowels can be used as guide pins to ensure proper mating of the 2 pieces during lead pour. Usually there are enough irregularities in the plaster pieces that they will mate without the guide pins. A rubber band is used to keep the pieces together during lead pour.

This type of mold will yield some number of heads before the mold disintegrates, so it is not to be considered as a last-forever product.

The reason I shared the above is that many of us do not have the necessary milling tools to create a permanent type of mold. The methods above will suffice until then. A similar-to-plaster mold can be made using liquid silicone, but I haven't tried it out, perhaps others can share their experience with same.

Bill Krejca

petewv
01-19-2012, 12:50 PM
i made a pyramid sinker mold out of easy sand dry wall power it was fast sitting 45 min.. i let the mold dry for a month before useing.

fishincrazy
01-19-2012, 01:37 PM
i made a pyramid sinker mold out of easy sand dry wall power it was fast sitting 45 min.. i let the mold dry for a month before useing.

How did it work out for you??

FC

petewv
01-19-2012, 04:57 PM
it worked. i made a wood form then poured the dry wall mud in the box then put the sinkers in the wet mud . after the mud set up i justed lifted out the sinkers. i let the mold dry for a long time . i melted some lead and poured into the form when the lead set up i just lifted the sinkers out of the mold. i did not make a lot of them so i do not know how long it would last. i poued about 10 of each size. i used copper wire for the hooks and just put the hooks in the melted lead.

fishincrazy
01-20-2012, 12:35 PM
it worked. i made a wood form then poured the dry wall mud in the box then put the sinkers in the wet mud . after the mud set up i justed lifted out the sinkers. i let the mold dry for a long time . i melted some lead and poured into the form when the lead set up i just lifted the sinkers out of the mold. i did not make a lot of them so i do not know how long it would last. i poued about 10 of each size. i used copper wire for the hooks and just put the hooks in the melted lead.


This is just why I started these Home Grown Threads.This is totally out of the box!AWESOME POST!!!!

I'm dyin to hear more!!!

FC :thumbsup:

kliph
01-20-2012, 10:47 PM
>>>This is just why I started these Home Grown Threads.This is totally out of the box! AWESOME POST!!!!

I'm dyin to hear more!!!<<<

Great ideas.
Here is one I made.
It is a pencil sinkers and a bottom bouncer weight.

fishincrazy
01-21-2012, 04:27 AM
This is awesome!!!I'd love to know how you do this and is it possible for someone with just a dremil tool to do it?Also I'd love to see more pictures!!!
GREAT JOB KLIPH!!!!! :bowdown:

FC :D

Seaark1660
01-21-2012, 11:36 PM
Thought about cleaning old vinyl paint off but never wanted to risk it, for my own safety:withstupid: I would make sure you check the hooks and make sure they are still OK. I even sharpen my often on the water anyway.Especially around rocks and wood.

That's something I do in the warm weather months outside,good way to recycle the larger ones.All the burned-off junk just floats to the top,skim it as needed.

I found a Wagner HT-1000 heat gun works great for preheating jigs.

I also use a white undercoat on a lot of colors.I bake the white ones first,then reheat for the second coat.This way minimizes the dripping,as opposed to double-dipping and then curing.Awesome results with the glow colors.

I will never go back to vinyl,the powder paint overall is much cheaper.No worries of it drying-up,and very little smell.

bigb027
01-22-2012, 08:49 AM
This thread is great. I have been doing my own jigs for a year now and really learned alot from this post. My first batch all grew noses when they dripped :fishhit: got some great tips here gonna start a fresh batch in a couple days. I would love to see a nice write up on a homemade fluidbed.

fishincrazy
01-22-2012, 09:29 AM
This thread is great. I have been doing my own jigs for a year now and really learned alot from this post. My first batch all grew noses when they dripped :fishhit: got some great tips here gonna start a fresh batch in a couple days. I would love to see a nice write up on a homemade fluidbed.

I just starting painting with pro tec this weekend I always have painted with vinyl jig paint When I was doing the pro tec some of my jigs did grow noses.So what I started to do was look for excess paint on the jig before I cured them.I scraped off the excess paint witn a toothpick.This worked for me on my last batch I only had one Pinocchio jig :eek: I guess I painted 2-300 jigs this weekend so far and I'm getting the hang of it!It's really allot of fun!Now I'm gonna tie em up!I hope to post some pictures as soon as I figure out why my camera won't up load to my computer any more.I'm gonna have my 15 year old fix that! :D

BTW THanks for the props on the thread!!!Look for the other Home Grown Tackle Threads!We can learn allot from each other!

FC :rock-on:

fishincrazy
01-22-2012, 09:31 AM
That's something I do in the warm weather months outside,good way to recycle the larger ones.All the burned-off junk just floats to the top,skim it as needed.

I found a Wagner HT-1000 heat gun works great for preheating jigs.

I also use a white undercoat on a lot of colors.I bake the white ones first,then reheat for the second coat.This way minimizes the dripping,as opposed to double-dipping and then curing.Awesome results with the glow colors.

I will never go back to vinyl,the powder paint overall is much cheaper.No worries of it drying-up,and very little smell.

I'm gonna try that today question do you re bake them after the second coat?With the white under coat does it change the finished color?

I'd love to see your work!!!

FC

bigb027
01-22-2012, 04:39 PM
I can make a fluid bed in a couple minutes, I have most of the parts laying around the garage. I just don't understand why people are useing a reducer instead of straight pipe and what the coffe filters are for ? Do i have to have the reducer or can i just pump air into a straight piece of pipe ? I got tons of pipe and fitting just curious.

Some good pics of one and maybe a how to build would help me out tons.

:cheers:

defish
01-22-2012, 06:24 PM
I can make a fluid bed in a couple minutes, I have most of the parts laying around the garage. I just don't understand why people are useing a reducer instead of straight pipe and what the coffe filters are for ? Do i have to have the reducer or can i just pump air into a straight piece of pipe ? I got tons of pipe and fitting just curious.

Some good pics of one and maybe a how to build would help me out tons.

:cheers:

The coffee filter (or better yet, part of a vacuum cleaner bag) is a diffuser to spread the air evenly across the fluid bed so the powder doesn't sit in a clump in some areas and get blown out of the cup in others.

The reducer is so the air can be feed evenly up into the cup and powder and so you can change cups to do different colors if you choose. Do a search on tackleunderground.com and "cadman" has simple fluid bed instructions that he'll send you upon request.

Dan

Seaark1660
01-22-2012, 11:22 PM
I'm gonna try that today question do you re bake them after the second coat?With the white under coat does it change the finished color?

I'd love to see your work!!!

FC

I'll put up some pics when I finish the first batch.I fully cure the first coat.I had a few drippers here and there.I clipped-off the excess and rounded the nose with an emery board.Just to look good.

The jigs get re-baked after the second coat.Finished color is much brighter than on plain lead.That is the florescent and glow colors.Glow orange looked a tad swirly,nothing bad.

I think for dotting the eyes,I will use lacquer paint instead of vinyl.

defish
01-23-2012, 07:52 AM
I'll put up some pics when I finish the first batch.I fully cure the first coat.I had a few drippers here and there.I clipped-off the excess and rounded the nose with an emery board.Just to look good.

The jigs get re-baked after the second coat.Finished color is much brighter than on plain lead.That is the florescent and glow colors.Glow orange looked a tad swirly,nothing bad.

I think for dotting the eyes,I will use lacquer paint instead of vinyl.

A tip for dealing with drips is to pinch them off with a long nose pliers as they form in the oven when you're curing the baits. Just grab the drip and not the lead and the paint will still be smooth and cover the lure. You will now have paint stuck to your pliers, but that's easy to knock off with the side of a putty knife, etc.

I agree with avoiding vinyl paint for eyes if you can - I HATE the smell. Before you paint a lot of eyes with lacquer you may want to do a couple of test lures to see if they'll stick reasonably well. Lacquer sometimes will slip off at the slightest touch, and as you probably know it will react with soft plastics. A quick alternative that is surprisingly durable is a black Sharpie pen.

Good luck.

Dan

2XL
01-23-2012, 10:48 AM
RE: Drips

I don't have many problems with drips anymore. IMO if you keep the powder paint fluffed up (lid on the jar and shake it up a bit) every 5 jigs or so you won't get the excess paint that creates the drips. Also, I don't keep the heated jig in the paint too long. I just dip it in the paint, swish it around once , pull it out ,tap an excess off on the edge of the paint container then on the rack it goes. Sometimes see that there is too much paint on the jig or I've gotten the jig too hot and get bubbles. I just wipe the bad spot on the back of my torch ( because I'm lazy lol) then reheat the jig just a little then redip the jig. More often than not the jig comes out fine.
Fluid beds are nice at keeping the powder paint fluffed up but they are time consuming (or at least the one I have is) when it comes to changing colors , clean up etc and not worth the effort for me. If I were painting large numbers of the same colors then yes, a fluid bed is a big plus.

RE: A white base coat

I don't paint a white base coat for the regular colors. Maybe it's just me and an old set of eyes but I just don't see a difference in the end result to justify the extra step. That being said, a white base coat is a plus when it comes to flouresent/glow or candy powder paint colors. I really like the looks you can get with the candy colored paints but they seem to chip more easily than the regular powder paint colors.

Those molds really rock !!!!!!

fishincrazy
01-23-2012, 05:32 PM
Finally figured out how to load these pictures,Jig's I painted this weekend and the tails that are gonna make em buck tails.

FC :raisin:

2XL
01-23-2012, 08:43 PM
Good job! You're off to a good start FC.

Pikeslayer8
01-23-2012, 09:09 PM
Love the pink ones FC. :rock-on:

fishincrazy
01-23-2012, 09:49 PM
Good job! You're off to a good start FC.

Love the pink ones FC. :rock-on:

Thanks guy's!!!PS the pink ones are hot on the lake I go to in Canada,I really haven't tried em here at home but you know I will!Now I just gotta remember how I tied bucktails.It's been like 15 years since I tied and I find my addle brained attempt was awful!

Any tips from guy's who tie would be helpful. :huh:

BTW 2XL those jigs are sweet!!!I really dig the mushroom head ones!I can see with a nice twister tail or a skinny worm on em working the transition line!!SWEET!!!!

FC

husker95
01-24-2012, 07:52 AM
I have been tying bucktails (we call them doll-flies out here) but the hair always seems to slip when i am done. Any suggestions to fix this problem? I use fingernail polish as my lacquer – do I need to use something else? Thanks

2XL
01-24-2012, 08:57 AM
Youtube is your friend when it comes to bucktail tying tutorials. :>)

The worm nose jigs are the bomb fished with plastics (jigging or casting)- Ringworms , Moxies, paddle tails, K grubs etc. I just got that mold last fall and it's becoming one of my favorite plastics jig head.


Thanks guy's!!!PS the pink ones are hot on the lake I go to in Canada,I really haven't tried em here at home but you know I will!Now I just gotta remember how I tied bucktails.It's been like 15 years since I tied and I find my addle brained attempt was awful!

Any tips from guy's who tie would be helpful. :huh:

BTW 2XL those jigs are sweet!!!I really dig the mushroom head ones!I can see with a nice twister tail or a skinny worm on em working the transition line!!SWEET!!!!

FC

2XL
01-24-2012, 09:05 AM
husker

Do you wrap the shank of your jig hook before adding hair? If not, you should. If you do then it may be you need to try a different thread.
I use Hard as Nails clear finger nail polish to finish my jigs and never had a problem with my wraps coming undone.
Check out You Tube for some jig tying tutorials. There are a few good ones that will help you out. YT also has some good powder painting tutorials for jigs and I think a few for powder painting blades.

fishincrazy
01-24-2012, 09:37 AM
husker

Do you wrap the shank of your jig hook before adding hair? If not, you should. If you do then it may be you need to try a different thread.
I use Hard as Nails clear finger nail polish to finish my jigs and never had a problem with my wraps coming undone.
Check out You Tube for some jig tying tutorials. There are a few good ones that will help you out. YT also has some good powder painting tutorials for jigs and I think a few for powder painting blades.


2XL
I'm having issue with thread?I've talked to my buddies here who tie but there tying big saltwater tails with heavy rod warping thread.Should I use the same thing??Or do you recommend something different?

FC :huh:

lassh
01-24-2012, 11:34 AM
I would recommend a good gsp (gel spun polyester) thread. I would use a 200 size thread. Do a base wrap first to secure the tying thread. Tie in the bucktail with nice tight wraps (use a bobbin) and finish with hard as nails or fly cement. Don't use too much bucktail material to keep nice undulation of the hairs in the water.

Your jigs look nice! I do like your avitars. "I know nothing!!"

husker95
01-24-2012, 12:13 PM
2XL and Lassh,
Maybe I'm getting somewhere now. I bought a spool of teflon thread because i kept breaking the other stuff when i cinched it up. I wonder if the teflon is slicker and letting the hair slip out? Is 200 size thread tough enough to cinch down tight on a big bucktail jig? Thanks.


Husker

2XL
01-24-2012, 12:22 PM
For sure I am not an expert when it comes to tying bucktails so I may be way off but here is what I use. Gudebrod 3/0 BCS F85 Fly tying thread. What all that means I do not know but I have had no problems using that thread in various colors. I got several spools of that stuff cheap years ago so that's the main reason I use it.
I am certainly open to other suggestions if anyone has a better thread to use..

Sgt. Shultz ROCKS ! LOL

fishincrazy
01-24-2012, 12:42 PM
For sure I am not an expert when it comes to tying bucktails so I may be way off but here is what I use. Gudebrod 3/0 BCS F85 Fly tying thread. What all that means I do not know but I have had no problems using that thread in various colors. I got several spools of that stuff cheap years ago so that's the main reason I use it.
I am certainly open to other suggestions if anyone has a better thread to use..

Sgt. Shultz ROCKS ! LOL

I've been told I look like him!What do you think????

FC :cheers:

fishincrazy
01-24-2012, 12:45 PM
2XL and Lassh,
Maybe I'm getting somewhere now. I bought a spool of teflon thread because i kept breaking the other stuff when i cinched it up. I wonder if the teflon is slicker and letting the hair slip out? Is 200 size thread tough enough to cinch down tight on a big bucktail jig? Thanks.


Husker

I know that the guy's I know who tie saltwater jigs up to lie 6oz's use Rod warping thread I don't know what that means I just know that it is allot heavier then the thread I have used for fresh water jigs.How big are the jig's your tying?

FC

fishincrazy
01-24-2012, 12:47 PM
I would recommend a good gsp (gel spun polyester) thread. I would use a 200 size thread. Do a base wrap first to secure the tying thread. Tie in the bucktail with nice tight wraps (use a bobbin) and finish with hard as nails or fly cement. Don't use too much bucktail material to keep nice undulation of the hairs in the water.

Your jigs look nice! I do like your avitars. "I know nothing!!"

Thanks lassh!!!It's true I really do know nothing!!Just ask my 15 year old son!!! :bangin:


FC :raisin:

husker95
01-24-2012, 03:01 PM
I know that the guy's I know who tie saltwater jigs up to lie 6oz's use Rod warping thread I don't know what that means I just know that it is allot heavier then the thread I have used for fresh water jigs.How big are the jig's your tying?

FC

They are not huge - 1/8 and 1/4 are the vast majority with a few in the 3/8 range. Why would anyone want rod warping thread?? JK - I know what you mean.

Husker

fishincrazy
01-24-2012, 04:06 PM
They are not huge - 1/8 and 1/4 are the vast majority with a few in the 3/8 range. Why would anyone want rod warping thread?? JK - I know what you mean.

Husker

I was told that it stands up to salt water where regular thread doesn't?I Know nothing!!Nothing!! :eek:

FC

Seaark1660
01-24-2012, 05:43 PM
I use size A rod wrapping thread,I have a large supply from years past.I use thinned-out clear lacquer to finish.No breaking problems at all.I tied flies in the past,and learned that cranking on the thread is not necessary.Thin, strong thread goes a long way.

Wrapping the shank once before tying is a must.

kliph
01-24-2012, 08:49 PM
This is awesome!!!I'd love to know how you do this and is it possible for someone with just a dremil tool to do it?Also I'd love to see more pictures!!!
GREAT JOB KLIPH!!!!! :bowdown:

FC :D

Ask and you shall receive. I see some talk about bottom bouncers at
times. Here is what I made. A 2 3/4 and 4 oz weight. I use them with
a three way swivel.
I don't think a Dremel tool would work.
BTW, pencil sinkers are easer to make. You just need a drill press.

Dabluz
01-25-2012, 03:04 AM
I have been tying bucktails (we call them doll-flies out here) but the hair always seems to slip when i am done. Any suggestions to fix this problem? I use fingernail polish as my lacquer – do I need to use something else? Thanks


Use a good thread that has a bit of stretch. I like monocord because it is strong, ties flat and has just that little bit of stretch to hold the materials to the hook shank.

Build a good solid base of thread before adding hair. Apply lacquer to the base and apply lacquer after every step of building the fly or jig.

Do not use clumps of hair that are too big. Better to add 2 or 3 clumps than one big clump.

Keep things tight. Use a heavy thread bobbin so that when you let it hang between each step, the thread does not get too loose.

When applying a clump of hair, use a good number of turns before letting the bobbin hang. When it comes time to add another clump of hair, you can unwind the thread a few turns so that the thread does not build up too much.

Get a whip finisher to make a good whip knot after the jig or fly has been tied.

I don't recommend nail polish. It does not soak into the threads as well as lacquer. When the lacquer gets too thick, add a bit of lacquer thinner. You can use nail polish if you want a special colour but wait for the lacquer to dry.

If you want a nice smooth finish on your thread winds, you can add a second and even a third coat of lacquer but you have to wait for the preceding coat to dry well. When I make the heads of streamers, I wait a good 5 or 6 hours between coats and then I wait until the next day to paint the eyes.

fishincrazy
01-25-2012, 05:44 AM
Use a good thread that has a bit of stretch. I like monocord because it is strong, ties flat and has just that little bit of stretch to hold the materials to the hook shank.

Build a good solid base of thread before adding hair. Apply lacquer to the base and apply lacquer after every step of building the fly or jig.

Do not use clumps of hair that are too big. Better to add 2 or 3 clumps than one big clump.

Keep things tight. Use a heavy thread bobbin so that when you let it hang between each step, the thread does not get too loose.

When applying a clump of hair, use a good number of turns before letting the bobbin hang. When it comes time to add another clump of hair, you can unwind the thread a few turns so that the thread does not build up too much.

Get a whip finisher to make a good whip knot after the jig or fly has been tied.

I don't recommend nail polish. It does not soak into the threads as well as lacquer. When the lacquer gets too thick, add a bit of lacquer thinner. You can use nail polish if you want a special colour but wait for the lacquer to dry.

If you want a nice smooth finish on your thread winds, you can add a second and even a third coat of lacquer but you have to wait for the preceding coat to dry well. When I make the heads of streamers, I wait a good 5 or 6 hours between coats and then I wait until the next day to paint the eyes.

Sweet DB!!!I was using Loon head cement when I tied in the past.I went to visit a friend who ties a bunch and he recommended the same!I'd love to see your streamers,I fish them allot in the surf we call em teasers and we double em up with a jig or a plug.Often times we catch only on the teaser.Makes me think I want to try this when jigging walleye you know double up.

FC

2XL
01-25-2012, 08:17 AM
Thanks Dabluz. I may try lacquer once my nail polish supply is gone.

WOW ! fishincrazy you DO look like Sgt Shultz ! LOL Don't feel bad, we've had a couple 15 year olds grow up in the house here and NOBODY knew anyhting except them. Now that one of them has a 15 year old of his own it's a total different story! PAYBACK ! LMAO

fishincrazy
01-25-2012, 12:21 PM
Thanks Dabluz. I may try lacquer once my nail polish supply is gone.

WOW ! fishincrazy you DO look like Sgt Shultz ! LOL Don't feel bad, we've had a couple 15 year olds grow up in the house here and NOBODY knew anyhting except them. Now that one of them has a 15 year old of his own it's a total different story! PAYBACK ! LMAO

NICE!!!!!! :thumbsup:

I Know Nothing!!!Nothing!!!!

FC :eek:

husker95
01-25-2012, 02:37 PM
Use a good thread that has a bit of stretch. I like monocord because it is strong, ties flat and has just that little bit of stretch to hold the materials to the hook shank.

Build a good solid base of thread before adding hair. Apply lacquer to the base and apply lacquer after every step of building the fly or jig.

Do not use clumps of hair that are too big. Better to add 2 or 3 clumps than one big clump.

Keep things tight. Use a heavy thread bobbin so that when you let it hang between each step, the thread does not get too loose.

When applying a clump of hair, use a good number of turns before letting the bobbin hang. When it comes time to add another clump of hair, you can unwind the thread a few turns so that the thread does not build up too much.

Get a whip finisher to make a good whip knot after the jig or fly has been tied.

I don't recommend nail polish. It does not soak into the threads as well as lacquer. When the lacquer gets too thick, add a bit of lacquer thinner. You can use nail polish if you want a special colour but wait for the lacquer to dry.

If you want a nice smooth finish on your thread winds, you can add a second and even a third coat of lacquer but you have to wait for the preceding coat to dry well. When I make the heads of streamers, I wait a good 5 or 6 hours between coats and then I wait until the next day to paint the eyes.


Thanks Dabluz! Do you mean nail lacquer or is this a special fly tieing substance?

I do have a whip finisher and use it when i tie. I consider myself fairly bright but for the life of me i cannot master the hand finish that some guys do.

Dabluz
01-26-2012, 02:04 AM
Thanks Dabluz! Do you mean nail lacquer or is this a special fly tieing substance?

I do have a whip finisher and use it when i tie. I consider myself fairly bright but for the life of me i cannot master the hand finish that some guys do.


No....not nail lacquer. It's too thick and has lots of stuff in it to cover nails. I mean real but just plain old lacquer. You can buy it by the gallon in any hardware store. I buy a pint of it and it lasts for years. The stuff they sell in fly tying boutiques is the same stuff that you can buy by the barrel. They resell it in a 1 ounce glass bottle for about 2 dollars. I think a gallon costs about 10 or 15 dollars.

I put my lacquer in a small plastic squeeze bottle with a tiny hollow tube that comes out the end. You can buy those small plastic squeeze bottles in fly tying shops for about 2 dollars. Makes applying the lacquer a breeze. However, plastic is porous to some extent. The vapours from the lacquer do seep through and after a month, the lacquer starts to get thick. I dilute with lacquer thinner. You can buy that at the hardware store....just next to the lacquer. Here again the fly tying shops sell 1 ounce bottles for about 2 dollars.

Anyway, brand new lacquer soaks real well into the thread windings. To make a nice shiny head on a fly, it can take up to 3 coats of lacquer. You can buy "gloss" to make streamer heads real shiny but I think that stuff is actually thicker lacquer.

I guess if you dilute the nail polish, it would work well but it's cheaper buying lacquer.

Yes....the hand made whip finish is something but it's not easy to do on tiny flies. If you are not careful, you can bend the fly or even break it. High quality, high carbon, forged hooks do not like being twisted to the side.

fishincrazy
01-26-2012, 05:13 AM
No....not nail lacquer. It's too thick and has lots of stuff in it to cover nails. I mean real but just plain old lacquer. You can buy it by the gallon in any hardware store. I buy a pint of it and it lasts for years. The stuff they sell in fly tying boutiques is the same stuff that you can buy by the barrel. They resell it in a 1 ounce glass bottle for about 2 dollars. I think a gallon costs about 10 or 15 dollars.

I put my lacquer in a small plastic squeeze bottle with a tiny hollow tube that comes out the end. You can buy those small plastic squeeze bottles in fly tying shops for about 2 dollars. Makes applying the lacquer a breeze. However, plastic is porous to some extent. The vapours from the lacquer do seep through and after a month, the lacquer starts to get thick. I dilute with lacquer thinner. You can buy that at the hardware store....just next to the lacquer. Here again the fly tying shops sell 1 ounce bottles for about 2 dollars.

Anyway, brand new lacquer soaks real well into the thread windings. To make a nice shiny head on a fly, it can take up to 3 coats of lacquer. You can buy "gloss" to make streamer heads real shiny but I think that stuff is actually thicker lacquer.

I guess if you dilute the nail polish, it would work well but it's cheaper buying lacquer.

Yes....the hand made whip finish is something but it's not easy to do on tiny flies. If you are not careful, you can bend the fly or even break it. High quality, high carbon, forged hooks do not like being twisted to the side.


I think I already have both of these things in my basement!Thanks DB now this is Home Grown!!!!

Perfect!!

FC :thumbsup:

2XL
01-26-2012, 07:33 AM
Dabluz

Do you think it would pay to transfer a small amount of laquer to an empty nail polish bottle or similar small bottle with a little brush on the lid? Seems a glass container would eliminate the laquer fumes seeping through a plastic container.

If I didn't have so much nail polish stocked up I would try it. Figures, I just tossed a couple empty polish bottles too. LOL

husker95
01-26-2012, 07:34 AM
No....not nail lacquer. It's too thick and has lots of stuff in it to cover nails. I mean real but just plain old lacquer. You can buy it by the gallon in any hardware store. I buy a pint of it and it lasts for years. The stuff they sell in fly tying boutiques is the same stuff that you can buy by the barrel. They resell it in a 1 ounce glass bottle for about 2 dollars. I think a gallon costs about 10 or 15 dollars.

I put my lacquer in a small plastic squeeze bottle with a tiny hollow tube that comes out the end. You can buy those small plastic squeeze bottles in fly tying shops for about 2 dollars. Makes applying the lacquer a breeze. However, plastic is porous to some extent. The vapours from the lacquer do seep through and after a month, the lacquer starts to get thick. I dilute with lacquer thinner. You can buy that at the hardware store....just next to the lacquer. Here again the fly tying shops sell 1 ounce bottles for about 2 dollars.

Anyway, brand new lacquer soaks real well into the thread windings. To make a nice shiny head on a fly, it can take up to 3 coats of lacquer. You can buy "gloss" to make streamer heads real shiny but I think that stuff is actually thicker lacquer.

I guess if you dilute the nail polish, it would work well but it's cheaper buying lacquer.

Yes....the hand made whip finish is something but it's not easy to do on tiny flies. If you are not careful, you can bend the fly or even break it. High quality, high carbon, forged hooks do not like being twisted to the side.

Gracias el jeffe.

Drummer Boy
01-26-2012, 08:36 AM
Use a good thread that has a bit of stretch. I like monocord because it is strong, ties flat and has just that little bit of stretch to hold the materials to the hook shank.

Build a good solid base of thread before adding hair. Apply lacquer to the base and apply lacquer after every step of building the fly or jig.

Do not use clumps of hair that are too big. Better to add 2 or 3 clumps than one big clump.

Keep things tight. Use a heavy thread bobbin so that when you let it hang between each step, the thread does not get too loose.

When applying a clump of hair, use a good number of turns before letting the bobbin hang. When it comes time to add another clump of hair, you can unwind the thread a few turns so that the thread does not build up too much.

Get a whip finisher to make a good whip knot after the jig or fly has been tied.

I don't recommend nail polish. It does not soak into the threads as well as lacquer. When the lacquer gets too thick, add a bit of lacquer thinner. You can use nail polish if you want a special colour but wait for the lacquer to dry.

If you want a nice smooth finish on your thread winds, you can add a second and even a third coat of lacquer but you have to wait for the preceding coat to dry well. When I make the heads of streamers, I wait a good 5 or 6 hours between coats and then I wait until the next day to paint the eyes.

The only thing I can add to this is when you first start tying on a clump of hair,the first few wraps should be with lighter pressure so the hair does not flair to much then progressive put more pressure on your raps.I like to put half hitches between clumps of hair and I use my fingers to whip finish just a different way to get the same results.

Bill Krejca
01-26-2012, 12:16 PM
Re: manual whip finish - One reason that I don't use it (other than maybe getting my clumsy fingers tied into my creation) is that I feel it increases the chance of inadvertently re-tying down hair, feathers, etc., or whatever is at the front end of the lure. I find that just using the loop I described earlier works best for me for jigs, except for flies, in which I use the old conventional type of whip finisher, which doesn't pick up the front already- tied- down materials.

Re: lacquer, nail polish, et al - I've been using from the same quart of lacquer for many years. Occasionally, I may add some lacquer thinner as needed. I purchased a small box of bottles with screw-on caps from a drug supply place, and refill as I need. Eventually, the contents of the bottle gets hardened, and I break out some more. I usually have several setting around at any time, as I try to fill 3-4 bottles at one time, due to the mess it makes, even with a small funnel, while pouring. I use a dart or other small pointed tool as a bodkin for applying the lacquer.

Bill Krejca

bigb027
01-26-2012, 02:16 PM
My first try at spoons with powder paint and the best way I have seen to store your jigs so they don't get beat to death. Great thread :)

codeblue
01-26-2012, 05:10 PM
We will see how these work!

fishincrazy
01-26-2012, 05:29 PM
My first try at spoons with powder paint and the best way I have seen to store your jigs so they don't get beat to death. Great thread :)

big there sweet!!!
So is that insulation board(I can't recall the name) for storing your jig's? That's a great idea.

Thanks for liking the thread!!

FC

fishincrazy
01-26-2012, 05:31 PM
We will see how these work!

Code I love that glow white color!also that dark blue!

there sweet!!!!

FC

codeblue
01-26-2012, 05:56 PM
Thanks!----one more----I call this one crawfish

Seaark1660
01-26-2012, 06:01 PM
I use thinned-out vinyl clear to seal the threads.I have a lot of fly-tying tools,but I just whip-finish by hand.

Seaark1660
01-26-2012, 06:02 PM
We will see how these work!

Sweet!

Pikeslayer8
01-26-2012, 06:32 PM
Thanks!----one more----I call this one crawfish
Sweet x2 :rock-on:
I use thinned-out vinyl clear to seal the threads.I have a lot of fly-tying tools,but I just whip-finish by hand.
Sweet x3 :rock-on:

B.Chunks
01-26-2012, 07:44 PM
A few my sponsor and buddy did for me.

fishincrazy
01-26-2012, 08:06 PM
A few my sponsor and buddy did for me.

B These Are Awesome I love the multi color!Pink Rocks!!!

FC :thumbsup:

fishincrazy
01-26-2012, 08:06 PM
Thanks!----one more----I call this one crawfish

Code This is hot!!!Is that flame red with black??

FC

codeblue
01-27-2012, 07:51 AM
The crawfish colors are blaze orange and top is copperhead.

fishincrazy
01-27-2012, 08:14 AM
The crawfish colors are blaze orange and top is copperhead.

Nice!!!!

FC

codeblue
01-27-2012, 08:57 AM
A few my sponsor and buddy did for me.

Nice looking paint...

defish
01-27-2012, 11:08 AM
The crawfish colors are blaze orange and top is copperhead.


Looks good!

I get a similar color by "cold dipping" orange jigs in black powder. Cold dipping or dusting cold lures with a paint brush creates a dust coat on the lure that hardens into a semi-transparent shading effect when it's cured.

A warning. Some colors play well with others, and some don't. Anything works on a white base coat, but Blue on Chartruese is a down right UGLY green.

Dan

codeblue
01-27-2012, 11:21 AM
I know what you mean about the color mixes---some mix some don't---and some react different than I thought it would.

That candy purple one I did got darker than I wanted---I really thought a bright white coat underneath would make it pop----it just sort of looks dark blue on top---almost too purple....


The best one of mine so far is definately the candy orange---- a white coat as a base really makes that one pop out compared to plain blaze orange.

It will be interesting to see what works the best this spring and summer.

My guess is the ugly ones will work better than "pretty" ones.....

fishincrazy
01-27-2012, 12:53 PM
I know what you mean about the color mixes---some mix some don't---and some react different than I thought it would.

That candy purple one I did got darker than I wanted---I really thought a bright white coat underneath would make it pop----it just sort of looks dark blue on top---almost too purple....


The best one of mine so far is definately the candy orange---- a white coat as a base really makes that one pop out compared to plain blaze orange.

It will be interesting to see what works the best this spring and summer.

My guess is the ugly ones will work better than "pretty" ones.....

There you go I like ugly!!!!! :thumbsup:

FC

Spinach
01-27-2012, 02:01 PM
Question on curing, if you don't get the jigs in an oven right after painting them, do you still get as good of a result if you cure them several days after they have been powder painted?

fishincrazy
01-28-2012, 05:09 PM
Question on curing, if you don't get the jigs in an oven right after painting them, do you still get as good of a result if you cure them several days after they have been powder painted?

I don't know if anyone else has done this but I left a whole rack sit for 2 day's and then baked em it worked out fine.I say go for it.

FC

walleye4
01-29-2012, 11:21 AM
Question on curing, if you don't get the jigs in an oven right after painting them, do you still get as good of a result if you cure them several days after they have been powder painted?

You can wait as long as you want before curing them. I sometimes paint 1000's of jigs before I cure them. This works better for me since I have a system for painting my eyes and it doesn't take as long when I can fill up all my eye boards with jigheads.

fishincrazy
01-30-2012, 05:39 PM
You can wait as long as you want before curing them. I sometimes paint 1000's of jigs before I cure them. This works better for me since I have a system for painting my eyes and it doesn't take as long when I can fill up all my eye boards with jigheads.

I'd love to see some of your work!

FC