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11-19-2019 11:05 AM
onebigmother
Quote:
Originally Posted by Waxy View Post
Have you experimented with props at all?

Motor height and prop design/pitch are pretty much inseparable. Depending on the prop, adding height will do nothing, and in some cases actually hurt performance. No one said chasing the magical 60 mph would be cheap!

As a side note, if you're looking for a prop for optimum MPG on those long runs, take a look at the Enertia ECO. It's the real deal. They really do increase MPG at cruising speeds and still provide good overall performance.

Waxy


I've tried a DAH Rev 4 19 pitch, and a Bravo 1LT in 21 and 22. I also sent the Rev 4 back in after the first season for a tweak.
Prior to the jackplate I have also run a Tempest plus 21 and a Bravo 1 FS in 21 and 22.
I've got nothing but resect for DAH, they are so helpful and friendly its crazy, but the LT runs the boat higher in the stern and lower in the bow making long rough runs noticeably smoother.
My dealer also lets me demo any prop he's got and before the jackplate was installed he's moved my motor up and down at request. The assistance of a good dealer is critical.
11-19-2019 10:37 AM
kswalleyer
Quote:
Originally Posted by kswalleyer View Post
have hydraulic jack plate on both bass boat and Walleye boat (119 and 621). on 621 I really like if for driving slow in shallow water, in timber, at ramps etc. I don't use it to get the last mph out of the motor. On multiple lakes up north this year, there were times when I was in real shallow water and could just drive with motor in vertical position easier.

that's about it for me. IF I didn't have those conditions, I wouldn't get it.
I may be wrong, but I think jack plates were kind of invented at/for places like lake Okechobee FL where long runs is shallow water with vegetation in bass boats are common. seems they have leaked north in bass boats and now into walleye boats. I like em in timber, in shallow natural lake ramps, bays, etc. that's just me...My son said to me once, "you use that jack plate way more than I thought you would" I agreed. I'm on it a lot...

the right answer is do whatever you want to do.
11-19-2019 09:48 AM
SLE
Quote:
Originally Posted by Waxy View Post
Have you experimented with props at all?

Motor height and prop design/pitch are pretty much inseparable. Depending on the prop, adding height will do nothing, and in some cases actually hurt performance. No one said chasing the magical 65-70 mph would be cheap!

As a side note, if you're looking for a prop for optimum MPG on those long runs, take a look at the Enertia ECO. It's the real deal. They really do increase MPG at cruising speeds and still provide good overall performance.

Waxy
I fixed on thing for you, your welcome, lol
11-19-2019 09:44 AM
SLE
Quote:
Originally Posted by Waxy View Post
Well, I have to say, I'm genuinely surprised by these responses. It's bizarre that people can have such different experiences with same product. Boats are crazy things...

Waxy
Agree'd Waxy, I would've never in a million years expected these responses.to each their own. I noticed the original poster never even asked if he should get one, it was more a question of how to use and the benefits. funny how things go pear shaped.............

For me, motor height has played a significant role in the performance I've gotten out of my last three boats. The first had no jack plate and I unbolted and raised the engine. This worked for one prop but was a detriment to another and you were stuck with where it was set. The second boat had a manual plate. This was great for dialing in props, but cumbersome for dialing into daily conditions and load which often times change throughout the day while on the water. This last one has a Bobs Hyd. plate which is the ticket as far as I'm concerned. It just offers so many benefits, even lowering the motor so it clears my garage door and raising it up with the trim at max down to get an oil pan under the skeg for changing lower unit oil, both consequential pros that I never thought about until I used it for those reasons (and yes I realize I could use the tongue jack for the oil change situation).
11-19-2019 09:08 AM
Waxy
Quote:
Originally Posted by onebigmother View Post
I've finished my second season with a jackplate, I like that I can raise the motor in shallow water but honestly I haven't seen any noticeable performance or MPG gains.
I fish Ft. Peck a lot and runs on that lake can be over 40 miles one way. I have played with the adjustments ALOT on those runs.
I just don't think a heavily loaded aluminum boat is the platform that will benefit from the jackplate. I certainly wouldn't buy another. JHMO.
Have you experimented with props at all?

Motor height and prop design/pitch are pretty much inseparable. Depending on the prop, adding height will do nothing, and in some cases actually hurt performance. No one said chasing the magical 60 mph would be cheap!

As a side note, if you're looking for a prop for optimum MPG on those long runs, take a look at the Enertia ECO. It's the real deal. They really do increase MPG at cruising speeds and still provide good overall performance.

Waxy
11-19-2019 09:01 AM
Waxy Well, I have to say, I'm genuinely surprised by these responses. It's bizarre that people can have such different experiences with same product. Boats are crazy things...

Waxy
11-19-2019 08:39 AM
clawman
Quote:
Originally Posted by onebigmother View Post
I've finished my second season with a jackplate, I like that I can raise the motor in shallow water but honestly I haven't seen any noticeable performance or MPG gains.
I fish Ft. Peck a lot and runs on that lake can be over 40 miles one way. I have played with the adjustments ALOT on those runs.
I just don't think a heavily loaded aluminum boat is the platform that will benefit from the jackplate. I certainly wouldn't buy another. JHMO.
Completely agree, I would not buy another on my next walleye boat. I would mount the engine higher though since now I can leave the motor at the #4 height and get the same performance as all the way down.
11-19-2019 07:54 AM
onebigmother I've finished my second season with a jackplate, I like that I can raise the motor in shallow water but honestly I haven't seen any noticeable performance or MPG gains.
I fish Ft. Peck a lot and runs on that lake can be over 40 miles one way. I have played with the adjustments ALOT on those runs.
I just don't think a heavily loaded aluminum boat is the platform that will benefit from the jackplate. I certainly wouldn't buy another. JHMO.
11-19-2019 05:41 AM
kswalleyer have hydraulic jack plate on both bass boat and Walleye boat (119 and 621). on 621 I really like if for driving slow in shallow water, in timber, at ramps etc. I don't use it to get the last mph out of the motor. On multiple lakes up north this year, there were times when I was in real shallow water and could just drive with motor in vertical position easier.

that's about it for me. IF I didn't have those conditions, I wouldn't get it.
11-18-2019 05:05 PM
Waxy
Quote:
Originally Posted by TomP. View Post
Talking to a few dealers and friends if the boat is properly set up to begin with right height and prop max you may see 2 MPH increase every one of them say the biggest reason on a Walleye boat is being able to run in shallower water. There is the advantage as mentioned in rough water being able to drop the motor but to the average Walleye guy it`s know where near a deal breaker.
Properly setup for what? Low speed/rough water? WOT/Max speed? Cruising? Somewhere in the middle is generally the compromise, so based on that, I'd agree that 2-4 mph is about right for WOT speed gains for the average walleye boat. It all depends on how it's setup to begin with, and of course, the prop.

Shallow water running is the very last thing on my list of pros when it comes to jack plates, it's not a big deal to me at all. I don't spend much time in water where I'm concerned about 4-6" of motor height as a deal breaker, in fact, in a big glass deep V walleye boat, I avoid it as best I can at all times. I'm DEFINITELY not running on plane in conditions like that lol. For low speed maneuvering in shallow water/marinas, a combination of trim/tilt and lifting the jack plate is most effective, but trim/tilt is the far more effective of the two in my opinion. Lifting the plate works well going forward, but reversing becomes a lot less effective, it's not much benefit for the most part.

Waxy
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