Home   |  Message Board   |  Information   |  Classifieds   |  Features   |  Video  |  Boat Reviews  |  Boat DIY
Walleye Message Central - Reply to Topic
Walleye Message Central

Go Back   Walleye Message Central > Boats, Motors, Electronics and Trailers > Boats > Anchor

Thread: Anchor Reply to Thread
Your Username: Click here to log in
Title:
  
Message:
Post Icons
You may choose an icon for your message from the following list:
 

Additional Options
Miscellaneous Options

Topic Review (Newest First)
10-21-2021 07:33 AM
last chance I just don't think the op needs a complete motor to anchor here. I think just a couple of heads off a big block chevy would hold him nicely, LOL.

all jokes aside all he needs is a 15# or an 18# fluke style anchor with the slip ring and enough rope and chain you will be able to anchor in anything but the roughest water.

I have anchored in over 2' waves with my light 7# fluke anchor with about 8' of chain and 150' of line out. maybe I was just lucky the one time I did this.
10-20-2021 11:29 AM
Anonymouse
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yellowfin123 View Post
yea i was way off its a little over 100k lbs
Ya tink?
67.5' with pulpit & 108,045 lbs. (full load). A couple of 1,800-hp DDC-MTU 16V2000 M90 diesels alone, puts it in the 50-ton class - not that Anonymouse knows a dang thingy about actual yachts. Still, nice boat to be a slip sailor on, if ya gots da moneeez.

For something that size, a rode angle of 45 degrees, or about 2X the vertical depth, would be more appropriate.
10-19-2021 09:07 PM
Yellowfin123
Quote:
Originally Posted by Anonymouse View Post
Not sure how big a 50k#-70k# boat is (40'-65' motor yacht?) but yeah, a shorter rode & steeper angle on a boat that size would be less than what you would use on a fishing rig - until you get caught in a monster blow - then you want al the rode you can put out so you aren't driven onto the shore.
Lift factor comes into play a bit. The more a boat "bounces" (bow going up and down between big waves), the longer rode you need out.
yea i was way off its a little over 100k lbs
10-19-2021 08:35 PM
Yellowfin123
Quote:
Originally Posted by Anonymouse View Post
Not sure how big a 50k#-70k# boat is (40'-65' motor yacht?) but yeah, a shorter rode & steeper angle on a boat that size would be less than what you would use on a fishing rig - until you get caught in a monster blow - then you want al the rode you can put out so you aren't driven onto the shore.
Lift factor comes into play a bit. The more a boat "bounces" (bow going up and down between big waves), the longer rode you need out.
i remember our "rode" angle looked different than everybody else but i thought the ol man must know what hes doin, HE DIDN'T, we got back from dinner and people were yelling our boat almost swung into theirs.. its a bertram 670 and its to much for his old A$$ but now days he's pretty much what we call a "slip sailor"
10-19-2021 08:19 PM
Anonymouse
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yellowfin123 View Post
thats a 10-4... my father in law really scares me when it time to anchor, he's always called it "scope" but sometimes i don't think he;s gota clue about how much "scope or "rode" to let out when anchoring , not sure what the boat weighs but i would guess 50-70k lbs, one time coming back from getting something to eat on the dingy we got yelled at, boat had to much "rode" out
Not sure how big a 50k#-70k# boat is (40'-65' motor yacht?) but yeah, a shorter rode & steeper angle on a boat that size would be less than what you would use on a fishing rig - until you get caught in a monster blow - then you want al the rode you can put out so you aren't driven onto the shore.
Lift factor comes into play a bit. The more a boat "bounces" (bow going up and down between big waves), the longer rode you need out.
10-19-2021 07:56 PM
Yellowfin123
Quote:
Originally Posted by Anonymouse View Post
Anchor "rode" consist of a length of chain, rope, or a combination of rope and chain, that connects an anchor to a boat.
The rope portion of an anchor rode typically consists of nylon three-strand, 12-strand or double-braid line.
Nylon is the material of choice, because it is elastic and able to absorb the shock loads encountered when anchoring. It's also fairly resistant to petroleum products and/or UV damage.
Polyester or other materials should not be used for anchor rodes, but there are natural fiber and other synthetic fibers (such as dacron, kevlar, and polypropylene), anchor ropes sold.

Briefly "rode" describes that length of the anchor rope that exceeds the length required to vertically touch bottom.
If the bottom is at 30', and you use 100' of rope, you have 70' of "rode" out.
Using rode allows the anchor to be tensioned at an angle and the contact portion of the anchor to dig into the bottom - rather than just sitting on the bottom and bouncing up and down with wave swells & thereby losing position when the anchor is NOT touching bottom.
The longer the rode, the shallower the angle of the tensioning on the anchor and the more horizontal component force involved in digging the points (or edge of a mushroom or can-O'-'crete) into the bottom to secure an anchorage.

Even big ol' Navy ships will back off a ways to set their flukes with rode (though it is usually enough to anchor into the wind and float downwind a bit to force the flukes into the bottom) - and those puppies weigh TONS.
Because of the relationship of wind-force to hull area/weight on bigger ships/boats, excessive amounts of rode are not always necessary, but for fishing craft - like yer typical 18' Lund - the waves exert a lot more force relative to hull area/weight against the boat and might require longer rode lengths to secure a firm position anchorage.
thats a 10-4... my father in law really scares me when it time to anchor, he's always called it "scope" but sometimes i don't think he;s gota clue about how much "scope or "rode" to let out when anchoring , not sure what the boat weighs but i would guess 50-70k lbs, one time coming back from getting something to eat on the dingy we got yelled at, boat had to much "rode" out
10-19-2021 07:04 PM
Anonymouse
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yellowfin123 View Post
mouse when you say "rode" is that another term for "scope" ??
Anchor "rode" consist of a length of chain, rope, or a combination of rope and chain, that connects an anchor to a boat.
The rope portion of an anchor rode typically consists of nylon three-strand, 12-strand or double-braid line.
Nylon is the material of choice, because it is elastic and able to absorb the shock loads encountered when anchoring. It's also fairly resistant to petroleum products and/or UV damage.
Polyester or other materials should not be used for anchor rodes, but there are natural fiber and other synthetic fibers (such as dacron, kevlar, and polypropylene), anchor ropes sold.

Briefly "rode" describes that length of the anchor rope that exceeds the length required to vertically touch bottom.
If the bottom is at 30', and you use 100' of rope, you have 70' of "rode" out.
Using rode allows the anchor to be tensioned at an angle and the contact portion of the anchor to dig into the bottom - rather than just sitting on the bottom and bouncing up and down with wave swells & thereby losing position when the anchor is NOT touching bottom.
The longer the rode, the shallower the angle of the tensioning on the anchor and the more horizontal component force involved in digging the points (or edge of a mushroom or can-O'-'crete) into the bottom to secure an anchorage.

Even big ol' Navy ships will back off a ways to set their flukes with rode (though it is usually enough to anchor into the wind and float downwind a bit to force the flukes into the bottom) - and those puppies weigh TONS.
Because of the relationship of wind-force to hull area/weight on bigger ships/boats, excessive amounts of rode are not always necessary, but for fishing craft - like yer typical 18' Lund - the waves exert a lot more force relative to hull area/weight against the boat and might require longer rode lengths to secure a firm position anchorage.
10-19-2021 06:13 PM
Yellowfin123
Quote:
Originally Posted by Anonymouse View Post
Tradeoffs.
Navy flukes are almost always able to be recovered from a tight crevasse in rocks where sand points, mushrooms, and can-O'-crete anchors are sure to be left behind.
If you fish only mud or sand, sand points are the best as they dig in deep and hold really well, but if you don't know the bottom content, navy fluke style is yer best bet to go home with as many anchors as you came with.
If you use plenty of rode, even the dull blades of a fluke-style anchor WILL eventually dig in and hold securely.
A side benefit of using a lot of rode is that if you are vertically fishing, the boat moves and swings the bait around laterally, more like natural prey.
mouse when you say "rode" is that another term for "scope" ??
10-19-2021 05:58 PM
Anonymouse
Quote:
Originally Posted by DW View Post
Unless your into lifting heavy anchors, the tests show navy anchors are the worst at holding. That is consistent with my experience and I got rid of mine. An engine block is probably a better choice.
Tradeoffs.
Navy flukes are almost always able to be recovered from a tight crevasse in rocks where sand points, mushrooms, and can-O'-crete anchors are sure to be left behind.
If you fish only mud or sand, sand points are the best as they dig in deep and hold really well, but if you don't know the bottom content, navy fluke style is yer best bet to go home with as many anchors as you came with.
If you use plenty of rode, even the dull blades of a fluke-style anchor WILL eventually dig in and hold securely.
A side benefit of using a lot of rode is that if you are vertically fishing, the boat moves and swings the bait around laterally, more like natural prey.
10-18-2021 11:47 PM
REW https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JtyurP2HYPc
This thread has more than 10 replies. Click here to review the whole thread.

Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 10:54 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2022, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2022 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.