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Topic Review (Newest First)
07-18-2021 11:10 AM
REW Allen,
Brake rotors rust.

Some brake rotors rust more than others. In particular, we are speaking of vehicles that may sit for long periods of time between uses.

Nothing wrong with the rotors. Nothing wrong with the brake pads. Nothing wrong with the calipers.

Simply an unused brake rotor sitting in its environment accumulating surface rust.

No need to go to the brake shop to fix anything, because nothing is wrong. But, if you take out this long stored, seldom used vehicle and find a raspy rumbling sound when you apply brakes, give the car the high speed panic stop in forward and reverse to see if it clears the issue.

If so, you have scrubbed off the surface rust on the rotors and you are good to go. If not, service your brakes as needed by yourself or a shop of your choice.

Best wishes.
07-17-2021 05:03 PM
AllenW There's a whole science to brake pads, rotors and calipers, no longer is there only one or two to choose from.
Life time pads may not stop you any faster but what they most likely do is when they wear out, the rotors will be shot also, softer pads, usually longer rotor life.

When I did brake jobs on my vehicles or someone else's, I would get the calipers, rotors and pads.
Rarely now days the rotors are thick enough to resurface, like days gone by.

Over kill, ya maybe, but when it comes to brakes, not a wise move to go cheap.

With the inner net today there's no reason for someone not to know basics about getting their cars fixed.

Instead of running down the road slamming brakes on, go to a repair station and have them look at the brakes, I'd bet it's the pucks in the calipers versus the pads, could be either though.

Al
07-17-2021 06:14 AM
last chance
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave G View Post
The local Ford dealer did the brakes and they were also the lowest price of the 3 places I got quotes. At the time I had to have it done in a 2-day window. The owner of the Ford dealer also owns the Toyota dealer (which was busy) so I wrongfully assumed they would put in quality brakes. It would have been nice if I had time to better research the kind of brakes being installed. I can understand a lifetime warranty on a newer vehicle but the SUV was 11-years-old.
going with the dealer I would assume they would use OEM replacement brakes. if they used subpar brakes thet would surprise me. even though the SUV is 11 yrs old you can't put a price on safety. my truck is 20 yrs old and I still put new ceramic lifetime brakes on it. now muffler and/or tailpipe is the best deal I can get on what I want. but usually OEM parts are the best part for that SUV except where they have the ceramic brakes.
07-16-2021 10:49 AM
Dave G The local Ford dealer did the brakes and they were also the lowest price of the 3 places I got quotes. At the time I had to have it done in a 2-day window. The owner of the Ford dealer also owns the Toyota dealer (which was busy) so I wrongfully assumed they would put in quality brakes. It would have been nice if I had time to better research the kind of brakes being installed. I can understand a lifetime warranty on a newer vehicle but the SUV was 11-years-old.
07-16-2021 09:47 AM
last chance
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave G View Post
Thanks to all who have replied to this problem. I suspect REW is right on with his assessment of rusting rotors and pads sticking (a special thanks to REW). I do have a roller trailer and normally hardly ever get the back tires wet. I have only experienced this problem in the last year when backing in far enough to float the boat off the trailer and therefore getting the rotors wet. The new brakes (rotors & pads) were installed by a low bidder so I expect they were lesser quality than the original Toyota brakes. This is something for all of us to consider when getting new brakes on our towing vehicles.
not trying to slam you or start anything. but when it comes to safety items I never settle for anything but the best. What's a few extra dollars for top-of-the-line replacement brakes? when it comes to any parts I get for my vehicles I always get lifetime replacement parts.
07-15-2021 02:51 PM
Dave G Thanks to all who have replied to this problem. I suspect REW is right on with his assessment of rusting rotors and pads sticking (a special thanks to REW). I do have a roller trailer and normally hardly ever get the back tires wet. I have only experienced this problem in the last year when backing in far enough to float the boat off the trailer and therefore getting the rotors wet. The new brakes (rotors & pads) were installed by a low bidder so I expect they were lesser quality than the original Toyota brakes. This is something for all of us to consider when getting new brakes on our towing vehicles.
07-15-2021 02:06 AM
REW Dave,
Actually it is a non issue.

When you submerge your wheels in water the brake rotors get wet.

When the wheels come out of the water and go sit in the parking lot while you are fishing the brake rotors rust and now and then they will rust the wheels nearly solid to the break rotors.

Easy solution. With the trailer disconnected to the vehicle, take the vehicle down the road up to about 40 mph and slam on the brakes hard enough to lock up the wheels. Then, put the vehicle in reverse and accelerate to as fast as you dare and slam on the brakes. Repeat the forward and reverse with a solid brake lockup at the end of each run up, until you can hear no brake sounds from your wheels in either reverse or in forward gear. A very common problem and a very easy solution.

However, if you are to the place where the wheels are essentially locking up so hard that it is next to impossible to break the brakes free, then it is a good idea to replace the brakes and rotors with rotors that have been coated with Guardian 40 and the use of Ceramic brake pads. By the use of these different type rotors and the use of the ceramic brake pads you normally eliminate to about 90% the issues with the rotors rusting up and creating noise.

-----------------------------
A couple of years ago, my son had stopped over with some new car cleaning products. One of them was a brand new - not on the market - wheel cleaner. The cleaner was applied per directions and the wheels were first coated with cleaner and then scrubbed free for a great shine and look. However, for one car, the car was just pulled forward into the garage and parked with no running after washing the wheels and getting the brakes heated up and dried out. When I went to use the vehicle the next time, I put the car in reverse and the vehicle would not move. I had to bring the rpm up to nearly 5000 rpm, before the brakes broke free of the rotors. I then went through the brake cleaning routine back and forth until the rust was gone and everything was freed up. But, this car had never had a rusting issue with the rotors before the cleaning process. Afterwards, virtually every rain or snow that came around the rotors would gather rust again and cause problems. So, even through the brakes and rotors were fairly new, I replaced the rotors with rotors and pads as listed above. Now, no further issues with any of the brakes at all on the vehicle. So in summary - the high test cleaner really cleaned too well and effectively destroyed one of the properties of the brake rotors and pads that had stopped the brakes from rusting up before the cleaning treatment. I do not use that cleaner on anything any more.

p.s.
you made no mention of the emergency brake in your post, so I am taking the stand that you are not having an emergency brake problem, but just a problem with the rotors and pads on the vehicle after being immersed in the water.

Best wishes.
07-14-2021 10:23 AM
AllenW """ I did have new brakes put in about a year ago and am wondering if this has happened to others or if there is a solution to this problem?""

Fwiw did they replace/rebuild the calipers, not all brake jobs include this.

Don't think it's the problem, but ya never know.

Al
07-14-2021 09:15 AM
Dave G The trailer does not have brakes. I only use the SUV's parking brake occasionally so I will check that out as a possible cause.
07-14-2021 08:48 AM
Pokey Fisherman I would guess that with the age of your vehicle its your parking brake cable. When my trucks would get that old the parking brake would stick.
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