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-   -   Jigging Setup (https://www.walleyecentral.com/forums/showthread.php?t=697688)

Mojo-NC 08-26-2019 07:50 AM

Jigging Setup
 
I read a lot of posts where folks have indicated their favorite set-ups for jigging. It seems most like to use spinning reels but some also like baitcasting reels with flipping switches.

What drives your preferences? I don't intend this to be a brand specific preference question.

I personally prefer to jig using spinning reels in size 2500 Shimano or size 30 Pflueger attached to a 6' 6" rod. I'm right-handed and think I get a better hook-set using my right hand. I use baitcasters a lot for other purposes but not jigging. If I did, it would have to be a left-handed model.

I've also noticed some folks also like the smaller Pflueger size 25 reels. I've never considered a smaller reel. Is there a noticeable difference and why might the smaller reel be a better choice?

bfish 08-26-2019 09:45 AM

spinning for casting jigs up to 3/16 oz
baitcasting for heavier jigs
flippling switch baitcaster for vertical fishing all size jigs.

djcoop52 08-26-2019 03:03 PM

Spinning for jigging, Bait caster for throwing spoons and heavy lures. 30 series Pflueger's on most of my rods 25 series on my crappie set-ups. I use bait caster for trolling on port side of boat and spinning reels on starboard side of boat. I'm right handed and that is the way I like it doesn't have to make sense to anybody else.

BornToFish 08-26-2019 03:11 PM

Follow-Up
 
Greetings,

I vertical jig for walleyes - a LOT! My preferred set up for vertical jigging is a spinning rod in ML power XF action or L power F action. I pair these spinning rods with a Shimano 1000 series spinning reel. I find that this size reel frame balances very nicely with my spinning rods. The rod + reel + line + jig is neither nose heavy or butt heavy - it just disappears in my hand. I believe that a perfectly balanced rod + reel + line + jig delivers peak sensitivity.

I will note that almost all of my vertical jigging is with jigs weighing 1/16 or 1/8 ounce. I am right handed.

Good fishing and tight lines!!

goldman 08-26-2019 05:02 PM

I like small reels for most of my fishing applications. Itís for this reason I avoided buying line counter reels up until just a few years ago, then I bought Diawa size 17ís.

The size 25 is the lightest of the Pflueger Supreme xt line.

Mojo-NC 08-30-2019 07:05 AM

These responses made me rethink my walleye jigging setup. I just might try the smaller reel with lighter line matched with the appropriate rod for vertical jigging to see if it has a better feel.

I do use a baitcasting setup for bass fishing with a jig, but that's flipping and pitching, so I don't really consider it to be jig fishing. I purchased a left-handed baitcasting reel for that style of fishing so I don't need to switch hands after the cast. I also use a much heavier setup to drag fish out of cover.

BornToFish 08-30-2019 08:13 AM

Follow-Up
 
Greetings,

I believe that two things are needed to get the most possible out of a vertical jigging presentation: sensitivity and power. Sensitivity is needed to feel the bottom of the lake, to make sure that one is jigging in the strike zone. Power is needed to drive the hook home when fishing in relatively deep water and to manage the fish during the fight.

I vertical jig with light power and medium light power spinning rods. I find these rods have adequate power to reliably set the hook and manage even larger walleyes during the battle to the boat. I gave up using ultra-light power rods for vertical presentations years ago, as I found that I was getting unreliable hook sets and had trouble bringing larger fish to the boat.

I believe that a set-up (rod + reel + line + jig) that is balanced achieves peak sensitivity. As mentioned above, sensitivity allows me to feel the bottom of the lake to make sure that I am in the walleye's strike zone, and allows me to feel the bite or if my bait is gone.

My vertical jigging rods are higher end St. Croix spinning rods. These are very lightweight fishing rods. I found that spinning reels with size 2000 or 2500 frames caused the fishing rod to feel "butt heavy" in my hand. Thus, I switched to spinning reels with size 1000 frames. My fishing rods with these smaller reels are neither "butt" or "tip" heavy. They just disappear in my hand, as they are balanced.

My point is that I believe the rod and reel need to balance. I stated in the previous paragraph how I achieve balance with my rods and reels. Someone using different fishing rods may need to use a different size spinning reel to achieve balance in their set-up. Everyone recognizes balance differently.

I will note that my fishing line is almost always Trilene XT or XL in six pound test. I routinely fish with jigs weighing 1/16 ounce, but will move up to 1/8 ounce when fishing deeper or rough water.

Good fishing and tight lines!!

Catcrazy3 08-30-2019 09:33 AM

I too like a 10/15 series reel for vertical jigging. I tend to go with 1/8 oz jigs in calmer water, 3/16 oz on windy days. HMG rod usually depends on line and jig weight. If I use spectra line I go a little longer on the rod (7 ft), if I use mono it is a usually a 6 ft rod, but have a set-up on 6-6 as well. I used to use a 6-3 rod religiously, but broke it and haven't found a suitable replacement.

mjayn 08-30-2019 10:13 AM

[QUOTE=BornToFish;6354366]Greetings,

I believe that two things are needed to get the most possible out of a vertical jigging presentation: sensitivity and power. Sensitivity is needed to feel the bottom of the lake, to make sure that one is jigging in the strike zone. Power is needed to drive the hook home when fishing in relatively deep water and to manage the fish during the fight.

I vertical jig with light power and medium light power spinning rods. I find these rods have adequate power to reliably set the hook and manage even larger walleyes during the battle to the boat. I gave up using ultra-light power rods for vertical presentations years ago, as I found that I was getting unreliable hook sets and had trouble bringing larger fish to the boat.

I believe that a set-up (rod + reel + line + jig) that is balanced achieves peak sensitivity. As mentioned above, sensitivity allows me to feel the bottom of the lake to make sure that I am in the walleye's strike zone, and allows me to feel the bite or if my bait is gone.

My vertical jigging rods are higher end St. Croix spinning rods. These are very lightweight fishing rods. I found that spinning reels with size 2000 or 2500 frames caused the fishing rod to feel "butt heavy" in my hand. Thus, I switched to spinning reels with size 1000 frames. My fishing rods with these smaller reels are neither "butt" or "tip" heavy. They just disappear in my hand, as they are balanced.

My point is that I believe the rod and reel need to balance. I stated in the previous paragraph how I achieve balance with my rods and reels. Someone using different fishing rods may need to use a different size spinning reel to achieve balance in their set-up. Everyone recognizes balance differently.

I will note that my fishing line is almost always Trilene XT or XL in six pound test. I routinely fish with jigs weighing 1/16 ounce, but will move up to 1/8 ounce when fishing deeper or rough water.

Good fishing and tight lines!![/QUOTE]

Seems odd that 2 or your three goals are Power and sensitivity yet you use mono, whose main weaknesses vs. braid are power and sensitivity. Your third goal is balance which braid won't effect.

Using braid would be the easiest and more importantly the most effective way to increase sensitivity and power.

I have no problem someone choosing mono, everyone is different. Just your response sounds like an advertisement for using braid.

I switched to braid originally to vertical jig. I add 3-5ft of mono or fluoro for a leader to add back a little stretch and lessen visibility. I am in sensitivity and hookset power heaven.

You definitely know exactly what you want. Just curious your thoughts on increasing sensitivity and power with braid?

BornToFish 08-30-2019 11:35 AM

Follow-Up
 
Greetings,

I tried using Fireline on one of my vertical jigging reels when those lines first came out. I couldn't get it off my reel fast enough. As I recall, that line had so much memory that the jig could not freely fall in the water column when the bail was open. I would encounter many false bottoms as the jig fell to the actual bottom of the lake. It also seemed to me that the fish was feeling me on my end of the line, just as well as I was feeling the fish on its end of the line.

I never tried any of the more advanced braids that came onto the market since then, as I never felt a need to change from monofilament. I've been very content with the cost and performance of monofilament on my spinning reels that I use for vertical jigging for walleyes. I know of other anglers at our fishing lodge in Ontario that feel the same way and have returned to monofilament.

I do use braids on my casting reels that I use when jigging through the ice for lake trout. The thinner diameter of these braids minimizes "bow" in the line when fishing current in 150-300 fow with 1-2 ounce jigs/spoons. I believe that braids offer me an advantage in this situation.

By all means, continue using whatever makes your brain happy when the fishing rod is in your hand. The fish just seem to bite better when the brain is happy.

Good fishing and tight lines!!


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