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  #31  
Old 03-30-2016, 09:01 AM
jtulius jtulius is offline
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Really appreciate everyone's feedback and stories.

My biggest concern is Lake Michigan. I live on the lake and plan on fishing Green Bay quite a bit. I previously have only fished lakes like flowages and Winnebago that can get nasty, but not as nasty as the big lake.

This information really helps. Its amazing to me that you have to go through months of classes and then temp driving and several written tests to get a car, but anyone can buy and drive a boat. I'm not advocating a long drawn out testing process, but I wish classes were offered on how to navigate big waves and dangerous water.
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  #32  
Old 03-30-2016, 11:05 AM
grizzley grizzley is offline
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I don't know if a short class on how to navigate big waves and dangerous water would be that beneficial. First hand experience under adverse conditions is the best teacher, and I would think a class would only embolden some to stay out longer than they should because they think they are now capable of handling the situation.
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  #33  
Old 03-30-2016, 01:15 PM
Bakefish Bakefish is offline
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I fished big water for years, and learned how to operate under adverse conditions. As I got older I learned to stay off of water I would have fished when I was younger. As I got older still I learned to say screw the big water and now fish smaller water most of the time. When I do fish big water (Lake Michigan) I tend to stay close to leeward shores. I'm not as angry at the fish as I once was.
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  #34  
Old 03-30-2016, 05:07 PM
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B-man B-man is offline
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Make sure you are prepared for the big water too.

Flares, VHF radio, sea anchor, GPS, life jackets (ON!), etc

Not meant to scare you, but this true story will help you realize what can happen, and how to prevent it.



http://www.glangler.com/_blog/Great_...oleman_Cooler/

Last edited by B-man; 03-30-2016 at 05:27 PM.
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  #35  
Old 03-31-2016, 09:16 AM
jtulius jtulius is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by B-man View Post
Make sure you are prepared for the big water too.

Flares, VHF radio, sea anchor, GPS, life jackets (ON!), etc

Not meant to scare you, but this true story will help you realize what can happen, and how to prevent it.



http://www.glangler.com/_blog/Great_...oleman_Cooler/
That story gave me the chills. What a nightmare and how quickly it can happen. I never want to be in that predicament.
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  #36  
Old 03-31-2016, 10:09 AM
cmdworker cmdworker is offline
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One more thing I thought of that I do religiously anymore: I always clip my engine kill/cutoff cord to myself when driving, regardless of conditions. When I first got my boat, it didn't even have a cord connected to the kill switch. After going over the scenarios of what would happen if I somehow came out of the drivers seat, if I hit a big wave, or hit a large submerged log, ect. If that happened, and you lost your seat and hit the floor, your throttle would stay exactly where you left it (in my boat anyway). You could imagine what could happen, possibly the steering is turned hard over to one direction, throttle still open, and you couldn't get up, or worse you were tossed from the boat. Anyway, I always clip the cutoff cord to myself, even in calm conditions.
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  #37  
Old 03-31-2016, 10:18 AM
Bakefish Bakefish is offline
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One more thing I thought of that I do religiously anymore: I always clip my engine kill/cutoff cord to myself when driving, regardless of conditions. When I first got my boat, it didn't even have a cord connected to the kill switch. After going over the scenarios of what would happen if I somehow came out of the drivers seat, if I hit a big wave, or hit a large submerged log, ect. If that happened, and you lost your seat and hit the floor, your throttle would stay exactly where you left it (in my boat anyway). You could imagine what could happen, possibly the steering is turned hard over to one direction, throttle still open, and you couldn't get up, or worse you were tossed from the boat. Anyway, I always clip the cutoff cord to myself, even in calm conditions.
I talked to a fella up in Canada who told me a story of driving down the lake on a perfectly calm day WOT when he hit a dead head (half submerged log). He and his buddy were launched from the boat, and the boat kept on going. It was spring and the water was cold, but both he and his buddy managed to reach shore. He said he always attaches the cutoff chord now.
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  #38  
Old 03-31-2016, 10:41 AM
CraigM CraigM is offline
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Originally Posted by azbohunter View Post
What she said!
Great advice . This may be preaching to the choir as most folks here already know what I am going to say next. but ..... there is no sense in underpowering a boat, max it out, setting it up with a jackplate and a 4 blade prop will help you to run like the wind when you have to get out of dodge ahead of bad weather . This allows you to use all of the power you have to steer your way out of harms way as previously described so well by Juls . For 60 years I have encounter my share of bad situations , common sense ( do not go or go home when threatening weather is apparent ) and a well set up and maintained maxed out boat has saved my butt many a time when I was surprised by a bad turn in the weather .
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  #39  
Old 03-31-2016, 10:48 AM
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Juls Juls is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cmdworker View Post
One more thing I thought of that I do religiously anymore: I always clip my engine kill/cutoff cord to myself when driving, regardless of conditions. When I first got my boat, it didn't even have a cord connected to the kill switch. After going over the scenarios of what would happen if I somehow came out of the drivers seat, if I hit a big wave, or hit a large submerged log, ect. If that happened, and you lost your seat and hit the floor, your throttle would stay exactly where you left it (in my boat anyway). You could imagine what could happen, possibly the steering is turned hard over to one direction, throttle still open, and you couldn't get up, or worse you were tossed from the boat. Anyway, I always clip the cutoff cord to myself, even in calm conditions.
I didn't mention that, because that's supposed to be a "given". Everyone should always be tethered to the kill switch when you're on plane, in any weather....always.
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  #40  
Old 03-31-2016, 10:56 AM
Scott C Scott C is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cmdworker View Post
One more thing I thought of that I do religiously anymore: I always clip my engine kill/cutoff cord to myself when driving, regardless of conditions. When I first got my boat, it didn't even have a cord connected to the kill switch. After going over the scenarios of what would happen if I somehow came out of the drivers seat, if I hit a big wave, or hit a large submerged log, ect. If that happened, and you lost your seat and hit the floor, your throttle would stay exactly where you left it (in my boat anyway). You could imagine what could happen, possibly the steering is turned hard over to one direction, throttle still open, and you couldn't get up, or worse you were tossed from the boat. Anyway, I always clip the cutoff cord to myself, even in calm conditions.
I had an extended family member get killed by his own boat. It was a tiller, got knocked off and the boat came back around an ran over him.
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