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  #1  
Old 01-19-2004, 02:25 PM
LyleK's Avatar
LyleK LyleK is offline
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Location: Warroad, MN, USA.
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Default Tire Pressure

Anyone familiar with the recommended tire pressure for a 1998 Ford F-150 4x4? Had the vechicle recently serviced and the tire pressure was increased to 40 psi. Truck seems to have lost some traction ability....... any thoughts?

Thanks
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  #2  
Old 01-19-2004, 03:40 PM
I_Bob I_Bob is offline
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Location: Newell, Iowa, USA.
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Default RE: Tire Pressure

I run 35# in mine. It has 16" wheels, I believe they recommend 40# with 17" wheels. Anytime you lower the air pressure it increases traction.
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Old 01-19-2004, 03:40 PM
I_Bob I_Bob is offline
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Default RE: Tire Pressure

I run 35# in mine. It has 16" wheels, I believe they recommend 40# with 17" wheels. Anytime you lower the air pressure it increases traction.
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  #4  
Old 01-19-2004, 03:51 PM
Rippin_Eyes Rippin_Eyes is offline
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Location: Isle, MN, USA.
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Default RE: Tire Pressure

Check the tire and see what it is rated for!!! My tires require 65 pounds.
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  #5  
Old 01-19-2004, 03:58 PM
sevenmmm
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Default RE: Tire Pressure



Oh, there was a few big long stories about those Ford Trucks in the tire magazines a few 4-5 years ago. And if I remember correctly, it was these vehicles that were prone to roll-over if either rear tire would blow-out at freeway speeds.

Some of the stories seem to point to Ford as being the culprit in that they requested the tires have a lessor air pressure rating to compensate for the stiff suspension.

Runnng your tire low on air is the absolute worse abuse you can put to a tire. With a bulging, low pressured caused sidewall, the action your tire gets is akin to taking a wire, and with both hands flexing it until it breaks.

So if you are smart, you will keep the air pressure at the recommended level (even if it results in less traction), unless you are still using the old Firestone ATX.

If thats the case - get rid of them!

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  #6  
Old 01-19-2004, 05:48 PM
GMC Jon GMC Jon is offline
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Default RE: Tire Pressure

The best thing to do is to check your owners manual. The pressure listed on the sidewall of the tire is the maximum pressure for that tire (from the tire company) not the vehicle manufacturer. Sometimes there is a label on the drivers door or on the door pillar with the recommended pressures.
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  #7  
Old 01-19-2004, 06:04 PM
shadowman shadowman is offline
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Default RE: Tire Pressure

i have to agree with GMC-jon, check your drivers side door inside on the jam or pillar you should have a label with what the makers reccomends.
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  #8  
Old 01-19-2004, 07:49 PM
hooky hooky is offline
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Default RE: Tire Pressure

GMC jon is right on!
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  #9  
Old 01-19-2004, 09:51 PM
Pitts Pitts is offline
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Join Date: Nov 1999
Location: Rosemount, MN, USA.
Posts: 1,965
Default RE: Tire Pressure

I have a hard time beleiving that a tire manufacturer is very far off on there recomendations for their tire at optimum performance.
I would make sure I was at least the min recomended by the vehicle or tire manufacturer and then watch the tire wear for center wear, (to much pressure) or both outside edge wear (to little pressure)to see if you are running the right pressure at everyday driving conditions.

If I had an 8 ply truck tire recomended 65 psi I would not run 32 psi just because that was written inside my door jamb. I would try to find a happy medium that I could live with.

Of course if you do decide to run low pressure for ride make sure you air them up to max recomended for towing. Low tire pressure while towing is dangerous your truck will sway all over the place from weakend sidewalls, and could result in a blowout from overheating.

Take care



Pitts
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  #10  
Old 01-19-2004, 11:14 PM
REW REW is offline
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Default RE: Tire Pressure

If you looked at the discovry channel of the icelanders conversion of a toyata 4X4 to cross the antiarctic, you will find that they installed large oversized tires and dropped the tire pressure to 2 psi.

Obviously they had problems in rolling the tires off the rims from time to time, but it made a huge difference in traction.

A very common solution to getting out of a badly stuck situation is to drop the tire pressure to a rather low level. Often as low as 10 psi. Dropping the tire pressure will generally make a large increase in available traction, with a corresponding increase in side sway, and instability, and of course very much shortned tire life.

As one of the other posts suggest - you might try the following.

On a clean dry pavement - take a piece of childrens sidewald chalk.

Then, when the tires are at the recommended tire pressure on the front door panel of the truck -scribe a line across the width of the face of each tire.
Then, roll the truck back and forth a few feet,so that there is a mark on the street from each of the 4 tires - from the chalk.
Examine the mark closely. You should find a mark that is uniform and even and just as wide as the width of the tire.

Now, drop the tire pressure by 10 lbs and repeat the test.

Now, increase the tire pressure by 20 lbs and repeat the test.

--
If you find that your tire is at optimum pressure, you will find a uniform line on the street.

If you find that your tires are overinflated, you will find that you have a line from the center of the tread, but the line will be thinner on the edges, indicating roll up of the outer tread, casued by too much pressure.

Conversely, if the tire is underinflated, you will find a heavy dark line on the edges of the tire, but it will be faint in the middle, indicating that the edges of the tire are carrying the weight and not the center.

This actually is quite accurate, and actually quite a good way to determine the optimum pressure for a particular rig.

Another pretty good guide is a simple eye ball test.
Stand - in front of and then behind the vehicle about 50 feet from the vehicle, and look for the shape of each tire. Each tire should appear to be round, with no large sag at the bottom, nor severe rounding at the bottom which would indicate over inflation.
Often the eye ball test - is right on.

Take care
REW

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