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  #1  
Old 08-30-2021, 12:51 PM
rogueriver rogueriver is offline
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Default drift bag for trolling?

The slowest I can get my boat, 16' Princecraft with a 40hp, is about 2.5mph. So I've been trying my drift bag off the back of the boat and can get down to .5 but cant steer very good at all. I'm just tying off on one of my back cleats, thinking of rigging up something so I can tie off each corner and get the bag right behind the boat and maybe not swing around so much in hopes that I could steer a little better. Anyone ever do anything like that or have a better idea for me?
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  #2  
Old 08-30-2021, 01:49 PM
buckmaster7600 buckmaster7600 is offline
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Default drift bag for trolling?

My winter boat is a 16ft Starcraft with a 60hp and a kicker and I use drift bags 100% of the time. Tie them off to the front anchor cleats and always run 2. Mine are small I think 14 or 16 I fish alone most days and they really help keep the boat straight and it keep the bow locked down when its bumpy.


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Last edited by buckmaster7600; 08-30-2021 at 02:42 PM.
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  #3  
Old 08-30-2021, 03:47 PM
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Clairebear Clairebear is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rogueriver View Post
The slowest I can get my boat, 16' Princecraft with a 40hp, is about 2.5mph. So I've been trying my drift bag off the back of the boat and can get down to .5 but cant steer very good at all. I'm just tying off on one of my back cleats, thinking of rigging up something so I can tie off each corner and get the bag right behind the boat and maybe not swing around so much in hopes that I could steer a little better. Anyone ever do anything like that or have a better idea for me?
The reason you can't control your boat is because the single drift bag is controlling the boat. Kind of like leaving one oar in the water in a canoe. You need 2 x 24" bags, one on each side and they shouldn't extend past the transom. Tie them off at the front.
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  #4  
Old 08-30-2021, 07:04 PM
Huntindave Huntindave is offline
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Originally Posted by rogueriver View Post
Anyone ever do anything like that or have a better idea for me?
Tie the bag to a front cleat. Either a single bag or two bags. Yes two bags will create an equal drag. A single bag will work but will pull just a bit sideways.

When you tie to the rear of a boat it kills the ability to steer.
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  #5  
Old 08-31-2021, 03:46 AM
brigeton brigeton is offline
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Default steer with trolling motor

I used to run 2 bags then I lost 1. Then I found a larger bag floating in the lake. Now I just use the larger bag tied to a front cleat. the secret to using 1 bag is to drop it in and adjust your steering on the main motor so you are going straight then use your bow mount to steer. I run the bags on about 4' of rope. It's enough to get the bags all the way in the water and they run about even with the console and don't get in the way of landing fish.

Last edited by brigeton; 08-31-2021 at 03:49 AM.
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  #6  
Old 08-31-2021, 07:10 AM
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I started by using large drift socks which didn't work so good. so I went back to the easy troll plate. then one day we found a set of trolling bags in the road near the geneva marina. i tried finding the owner but had no luck. one day my oldest son said let's try the bags. so we broke them out just to show my son they were junk. but when we put them out on the front cleats and let them back to the rod holders and tied the back to the back rod holder. these worked great they didn't mess with the steering all that much and with the trolling bags being tied front and back everything worked much better than plates. no way drift socks will work like trolling bags that tie in the back. its been about 6 or 8 yrs since we found those bags and were still using then but not so much with my old boat since we started trolling spoons at 2.6 to 3.0. and now after breaking it were going to a 9.9 mercury 4 stroke on the 26' boat we bought.


in your case, I would get a pair of 22" trolling bags from amishoutfitters.com. it will solve your problem if tied off to the front cleat and the rear of the bag tied off to the back of the boat. we've trolled with one bag a lot and if it's tied correctly it's not that hard to do.

Last edited by last chance; 08-31-2021 at 07:21 AM.
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  #7  
Old 08-31-2021, 08:00 AM
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KPKyllo KPKyllo is offline
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I used the following method to slow my boat to trolling speed for several years prior to getting a kicker. I used some inexpensive Cabela's drift socks and the system worked very, very well. Below is an article from Lindy that describes it. I used two 30 inch bags on my 17.5 ft. boat.

THE TAMER TROLLING SYSTEM...IN THE WIND AND IN CONTROL
If you've you ever trolled in the wind, you know how frustrating it can be. The bow of your boat blows off line, forcing you to speed up to get back on line. Take your eye off the bow for one second, and it happens again. Sound familiar? Cross winds, head winds and waves will wear you out - but there is something you can do to get back under control.
Recently we at Tamer began testing a new trolling technique using two Wave Tamers to stabilize the bow. For small boats and engines 100 hp and smaller, we recommend two 30" Wave Tamers. For larger boats and engines above 100 hp, we recommend two 40" Wave Tamers.
The trolling bags help anchor the bow so the wind doesn't affect it as much, which results in much better handling. Several tournament pros were instrumental in developing this technique, and perfected the rigging during numerous PWT and RCL walleye events. Special thanks go to Johnnie Candle and Jim Carroll of North Dakota. The system has since caught on, and has received high marks from all the pros using it.
Here's how to rig up for the Tamer Trolling System. With your boat on the trailer, take a length of 1/2" limp nylon rope or soft dock rope, make a 6" loop on one end, then fasten it to your mid ship cleat. Run the other end under your boat, up to the other mid ship cleat, and tie it off as tightly as you can. Next crawl under your boat, and with a marking pen, mark the rope where it meets the keel in the center of the hull. Now make two more marks approximately 14" on either side of the first mark.
Next release the rope and pull it from under the boat. Run the rope through the loop on your Wave Tamer until it contacts the outside mark. Tie a simple over-hand knot, making sure the loop of the Wave Tamer is in the center of the knot. Repeat this process on the other outside mark. Pass the rope and bags under the boat and reattach as before, paying close attention that the bags are an equal distance apart on each side of the keel. You may have to adjust the loops to make sure they're rigged evenly.
IMPORTANT- Both rope ends must be attached to the cleats when you deploy your trolling bags. You must be able to drop the bags over the front of the boat with both loops fastened to the cleats. BE SURE THE MOTOR IS IN NEUTRAL!
To deploy the trolling bags, stop your motor and fasten the loops to the mid ship cleats. Drop both bags over the front of the boat. You can be sure the rigging is in place by pulling the rope as tight as you can and tying it off.
To retrieve the bags, STOP the boat by putting the motor in neutral to release tension on the rope. Go to the short end of the rope and begin to pull in your bags. Be sure both loops are fastened to the cleats, so there's no loose end to deal with.
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Old 08-31-2021, 08:17 AM
bfish bfish is offline
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I dislike bags on my tight turning trolling routes.....

Have you changed the motor trim? Left the bow trolling motor down?

I have also hung a 10 lb mushroom anchor of the bow (about 15 ft of line).

On windy days, raising or lowering the bimini can make a big difference.

Lastly, change the pitch of your prop.
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Old 08-31-2021, 10:15 AM
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after going to the trolling bags i haven't had any real problems with my 21' glass boat. I just make sure they are tied off as far forward as you can get them with about an 8' lead on my boat. but the most important part is to have the tie rope on the back of the bags and tied tightly to the rear of the boat.

bags that are not tied off in the back has a tendency to pull out away from the boat causing steering problems even in somewhat calm water. the drift socks I TRIED using didn't have any rope to tie it off and I had a nightmare trying to control the boat. most quality trolling bags have a rear rope or a place to put one. with 2 bags tied up firmly, there's just no need for all that rigging. just my opinion after using drift bags and then using a quality trolling bag. if I had to use a big drift bag swinging back and forth in the waves I would quit fishing on rough days.
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  #10  
Old 08-31-2021, 11:56 AM
Swarwick Swarwick is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KPKyllo View Post
I used the following method to slow my boat to trolling speed for several years prior to getting a kicker. I used some inexpensive Cabela's drift socks and the system worked very, very well. Below is an article from Lindy that describes it. I used two 30 inch bags on my 17.5 ft. boat.

THE TAMER TROLLING SYSTEM...IN THE WIND AND IN CONTROL
If you've you ever trolled in the wind, you know how frustrating it can be. The bow of your boat blows off line, forcing you to speed up to get back on line. Take your eye off the bow for one second, and it happens again. Sound familiar? Cross winds, head winds and waves will wear you out - but there is something you can do to get back under control.
Recently we at Tamer began testing a new trolling technique using two Wave Tamers to stabilize the bow. For small boats and engines 100 hp and smaller, we recommend two 30" Wave Tamers. For larger boats and engines above 100 hp, we recommend two 40" Wave Tamers.
The trolling bags help anchor the bow so the wind doesn't affect it as much, which results in much better handling. Several tournament pros were instrumental in developing this technique, and perfected the rigging during numerous PWT and RCL walleye events. Special thanks go to Johnnie Candle and Jim Carroll of North Dakota. The system has since caught on, and has received high marks from all the pros using it.
Here's how to rig up for the Tamer Trolling System. With your boat on the trailer, take a length of 1/2" limp nylon rope or soft dock rope, make a 6" loop on one end, then fasten it to your mid ship cleat. Run the other end under your boat, up to the other mid ship cleat, and tie it off as tightly as you can. Next crawl under your boat, and with a marking pen, mark the rope where it meets the keel in the center of the hull. Now make two more marks approximately 14" on either side of the first mark.
Next release the rope and pull it from under the boat. Run the rope through the loop on your Wave Tamer until it contacts the outside mark. Tie a simple over-hand knot, making sure the loop of the Wave Tamer is in the center of the knot. Repeat this process on the other outside mark. Pass the rope and bags under the boat and reattach as before, paying close attention that the bags are an equal distance apart on each side of the keel. You may have to adjust the loops to make sure they're rigged evenly.
IMPORTANT- Both rope ends must be attached to the cleats when you deploy your trolling bags. You must be able to drop the bags over the front of the boat with both loops fastened to the cleats. BE SURE THE MOTOR IS IN NEUTRAL!
To deploy the trolling bags, stop your motor and fasten the loops to the mid ship cleats. Drop both bags over the front of the boat. You can be sure the rigging is in place by pulling the rope as tight as you can and tying it off.
To retrieve the bags, STOP the boat by putting the motor in neutral to release tension on the rope. Go to the short end of the rope and begin to pull in your bags. Be sure both loops are fastened to the cleats, so there's no loose end to deal with.

I use this with my current boat. It works great


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