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  #21  
Old 08-17-2016, 10:25 PM
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Minnie Man Minnie Man is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Burr View Post
Something you can try, if you have a stable rest to place and point the gun.

Set the gun on the rest/bench - pointed at the target, with bolt removed. Look through the barrel, and center the bulls eye on the target when looking through the barrel. Then, without touching or moving the gun at all, lift your eye to look through the scope - the cross hairs should be centered on the same spot as looking through the barrel. If not, adjust scope accordingly.

That does not replace shooting, but quite often it will get you on paper so you can shoot your way into the bullseye.

It's one way for those that don't have access to a bore sight at the moment, or those that chose to go without one.

The above approach has worked for me for years and years, but I have one rifle that I could not get on paper with the approach. Only had a few test loads with me, and by the time I realized I should start a little closer to get on paper, I was out of loaded rounds. Oh well, that trip was primarily to test out some starting loads, it would have been nice to know where it was hitting, but I didn't find out on that trip.
This is exactly how I do it.
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  #22  
Old 08-24-2016, 07:38 PM
egladding egladding is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Burr View Post
Something you can try, if you have a stable rest to place and point the gun.

Set the gun on the rest/bench - pointed at the target, with bolt removed. Look through the barrel, and center the bulls eye on the target when looking through the barrel. Then, without touching or moving the gun at all, lift your eye to look through the scope - the cross hairs should be centered on the same spot as looking through the barrel. If not, adjust scope accordingly.

That does not replace shooting, but quite often it will get you on paper so you can shoot your way into the bullseye.

It's one way for those that don't have access to a bore sight at the moment, or those that chose to go without one.

The above approach has worked for me for years and years, but I have one rifle that I could not get on paper with the approach. Only had a few test loads with me, and by the time I realized I should start a little closer to get on paper, I was out of loaded rounds. Oh well, that trip was primarily to test out some starting loads, it would have been nice to know where it was hitting, but I didn't find out on that trip.
^^^This is how I do it also. Another tip when sighting in after the initial bore sight adjustment is to hold your crosshairs on the bullseye, fire, readjust the rifle so the crosshairs are back on the bullseye and adjust the scope without moving the rifle so the crosshairs are now on the bullet hole.(it helps to have a gun vise for sighting in like this) Once you do that you should be right on. Take one more shot to confirm the scope adjusted correctly. It works good with all my Nikon scopes.

On a side note, the average 30.06 bullet has a maximum point blank of around 275 yards. Which means the bullet shouldn't travel more then +/- 3 inches in that yardage. That is an average, obviously some bullets depending on grain and coefficient are more or less. If your game is within that range, put the crosshairs dead on and squeeze the trigger. It should go without saying that you should practice out to those yardages before trying to take the life of any animal but the rifle will be more than capable to get the job done without any adjustment.
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  #23  
Old 12-13-2017, 01:13 PM
johnboat johnboat is offline
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I think I'm there. On my last trip out, I shot these groups on a smaller 50 yard target at a distance of 100 yards. The group on the right was shot 1st. 4 clicks later I shot the group on the left. The shot in the black tape was one of those shots that "surprises" you.

After all the shooting was done, I came to these conclusions.
1. I do NOT agree with the mindset that you want to squeeze the trigger slowly until the shot "surprises" you. It feels like an accidental discharge to me. Not that you should "punch" the trigger, but the shot should be taken at the exact moment you want it to go off.

2. Rifles are much more accurate when they are shot "dirty". At first I would clean the inside of the barrel thoroughly after each session. The next trip out my first 6-8 shots were not as tight as when I left the session before. (Making me worry about the quality and condition of my scope) After about 8 shots my groups started to tighten up. After doing some reading I learned that most snipers do not clean their barrel until 200 to sometimes 300 rounds have been fired through it.

3. It is important to have your scope mounted tightly. "Yeah, yeah, yeah", I said to myself when reading this #1 rule on EVERY article I read. I believed it after the scope came loose in my hand during what was supposed to be the final cleaning after I had it zeroed the first time. There went 100 bucks worth of ammo.

4. Lucky for me I don't have an unlimited bank account. For as much as I enjoyed this process I can see where you would want a better scope, rifle, ammo, bench rest....etc, each of which seems to have no end in what you could spend.

5. Long range shooting is a heck of a lot of fun.

So anyway, 2 more clicks and I'm putting her in the case and waiting 25 more days to head to NW Ontario and harvest a Wolf.

Thanks for all the tips and advice.
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  #24  
Old 12-13-2017, 02:53 PM
grizzley grizzley is offline
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Took you long enough! , not bad at 100. Also, BLUE Loctite is your friend when it comes to mounting scopes.
Good luck on the hunt!
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  #25  
Old 12-13-2017, 04:24 PM
johnboat johnboat is offline
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Ha! I know. No need to be out on the range when it's nice and sunny out. :/ And yes, blue loctite it is.
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  #26  
Old 12-13-2017, 06:43 PM
spurs101 spurs101 is offline
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Make sure to test the BDC on that BSA. The only BSA I had didn't stay on that rifle very long after running the BDC up and down a few times.
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  #27  
Old 12-13-2017, 07:52 PM
whitedogone whitedogone is offline
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I wouldn't trust a BSA on a bb gun. Not a question as to if it will fail, it is when will it fail. Nice shooting, BTW
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  #28  
Old 12-13-2017, 08:05 PM
johnboat johnboat is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by spurs101 View Post
Make sure to test the BDC on that BSA. The only BSA I had didn't stay on that rifle very long after running the BDC up and down a few times.
Just for clarification, are you saying that once you adjusted your turret on the scope off of 100 yards (the distance scope was zeroed in at) to say 250 yards (at the range or a shot on an animal) then back to 100 as it was before, your scope did not return to zero?

I thought BDC was the multiple horizontal lines on the reticle. This scope does not have that.

I'm no scope wizard. Just asking.
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  #29  
Old 12-13-2017, 08:32 PM
johnboat johnboat is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by whitedogone View Post
I wouldn't trust a BSA on a bb gun. Not a question as to if it will fail, it is when will it fail. Nice shooting, BTW
Thank you.

I have researched, and am aware of the various opinions on BSA scopes. While some shared your opinion, others stated they were better than other more expensive scopes they had owned. (Just like everything)
The price I payed for the used gun and scope package was minimal. I was willing to purchase another scope but decided to give this one a try first and see how it went. I've only run a little over 200 rounds through it but so far I have been satisfied. I hope it stays that way.
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  #30  
Old 12-14-2017, 05:59 PM
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yarcraft91 yarcraft91 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by johnboat View Post
Ha! I know. No need to be out on the range when it's nice and sunny out. :/ And yes, blue loctite it is.
A torque wrench can also be your friend when mounting a scope. The people who make the rings should know the torque specs for their rings.
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