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  #1  
Old 06-02-2019, 04:30 PM
benltr benltr is offline
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Join Date: Sep 2018
Posts: 82
Default Seastar HC53345

Hi,

For those who have this hydraulic system, how much play do you have in your steering?

I have this system on my new V8 250 PRO XS (14 hours) and i have about 1 inch 1/4. I had a bit more before and i went back to the dealer to bleed it out again and it is now smoother but still have some play in the steering and wanted to know if it's normal. I'm used to the electric hydraulic system of the old verado.

Thanks,
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  #2  
Old 06-05-2019, 08:51 AM
benltr benltr is offline
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Anyone ?

It doesn't matter if it's the Seastar Hc5345 or any other hydraulic, just want to have a base reference.
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  #3  
Old 06-06-2019, 07:19 PM
staylor staylor is offline
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Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: North Tonawanda, NY, USA.
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I have the Seastar 5345 cylinder and when properly bled and adjusted the play as measured at the cylinder piston rod is plus/minus 0.04 inches- just about a spark plug gap- when pushing/pulling the cav plate back and forth by hand. The system has been bled 3 times to get the low play. Also, there is an mechanical adjustment nut that also must be adjusted to take play out of the system. This is a knurled nut usually on the starboard side tilt tube of the motor where the seastar bracket attaches. This nut is locked in place with an allen head screw and nut. To adjust, loosen the locking screw a bit just until you can turn the nut. Then, while pushing and pulling the cav plate back and forth with your hand, turn the nut with your other hand until all play is gone. Then retighten the lock screw.

If doing a manual bleed after you have gotten almost of the play out, I attach two 12 inch clear hoses to the seastar cylinder bleeds, and duct tape these loosely to the engine cowling. I then add fluid to the open end of the hoses until they are half filled. Then I bleed the system by turning the steering wheel to lock and open the associated bleed per the seastar manual, watching for air bubbles coming out into the hose. This is repeated in the opposite direction per the seastar manual. When done, I usually repeat the procedure before I remove the hoses. The partially filled hose keeps air from being sucked back into the cylinder after you’ve bled the system and are closing the bleed plug.

An alternative is to use a power bleed system which some dealers have- but this will cost you compared to DIY.
Doug
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  #4  
Old 06-07-2019, 12:54 PM
benltr benltr is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by staylor View Post
I have the Seastar 5345 cylinder and when properly bled and adjusted the play as measured at the cylinder piston rod is plus/minus 0.04 inches- just about a spark plug gap- when pushing/pulling the cav plate back and forth by hand. The system has been bled 3 times to get the low play. Also, there is an mechanical adjustment nut that also must be adjusted to take play out of the system. This is a knurled nut usually on the starboard side tilt tube of the motor where the seastar bracket attaches. This nut is locked in place with an allen head screw and nut. To adjust, loosen the locking screw a bit just until you can turn the nut. Then, while pushing and pulling the cav plate back and forth with your hand, turn the nut with your other hand until all play is gone. Then retighten the lock screw.

If doing a manual bleed after you have gotten almost of the play out, I attach two 12 inch clear hoses to the seastar cylinder bleeds, and duct tape these loosely to the engine cowling. I then add fluid to the open end of the hoses until they are half filled. Then I bleed the system by turning the steering wheel to lock and open the associated bleed per the seastar manual, watching for air bubbles coming out into the hose. This is repeated in the opposite direction per the seastar manual. When done, I usually repeat the procedure before I remove the hoses. The partially filled hose keeps air from being sucked back into the cylinder after you’ve bled the system and are closing the bleed plug.

An alternative is to use a power bleed system which some dealers have- but this will cost you compared to DIY.
Doug
Thanks very good info.
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  #5  
Old 06-10-2019, 09:46 PM
EasternWashingtonBoater EasternWashingtonBoater is online now
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Join Date: Feb 2018
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Seems like excessive play.
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