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Old 11-19-2021, 11:31 AM
Derwood Derwood is offline
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Default Tire Pressure for Winter - how many PSI?

What do you guys set the tire pressure at in your trucks when winter/cold temps get here? My truck has Bridgestone Dueler Alenza tires (size 275/55R20). I just got in it after not driving much these last few weeks, and they're at 28 psi. That seems low to me. Tire says up to 44 psi but I don't think I should set them that high. I was thinking more like 32-33 psi. Thoughts?
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Old 11-19-2021, 11:37 AM
Bigtaproot Bigtaproot is offline
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look in the passenger side door and it will give you the pressure recommendation. I go with about 32 as you mentioned all year long. Also, check with two gauges as the cheap ones that we all own are many times inaccurate. Rather than what gauge says, check into your TPMS readings on the truck if it is a newer model. That will be more accurate than your gauge. Search TPMS in the owners manual

Good luck,
Bigtap
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Old 11-19-2021, 12:29 PM
Da' Walleye Assassun Da' Walleye Assassun is offline
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Every 10 degree change in air temperature is about 1 psi difference in tire pressure. Check the tire pressure when the tires are cold at the lowest air temperature. Those pencil type gauges are not accurate. Buy a dial type gauge of good quality.
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Old 11-19-2021, 12:38 PM
Derwood Derwood is offline
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Thanks for the advice folks. BigT-root, I found that sticker on the Driver's side front door. It says 30psi in front, and 33 psi in the rears. I supposed I should follow that recommendation, right??

Appreciate the help!

Last edited by Derwood; 11-19-2021 at 12:54 PM.
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Old 11-19-2021, 01:50 PM
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7 Mag 7 Mag is offline
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I go by the tire recommendation, on my truck the Michelins say 44 psi cold i try to maintain 42 psi year round. 32 psi on a tire thats rated 44 psi max cold is too low in my opinion especially if you tow something.
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Old 11-19-2021, 03:39 PM
Derwood Derwood is offline
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After Mag's comment, I decided to call my local shop where I have been taking my vehicles for years (we just have more reliable cars/trucks now and don't see him as often). He said if it was HIS truck, he'd fill them to all to the same tire pressure - 35 psi. So I did that. I used my little Ryobi tire inflator (digital readout) and filled them to 35 psi. Then I checked the TPMS in the truck and they all say 33 psi. I'm guessing the truck sensors are probably correct and I gotta put in another 2lbs for each tire??? Agree?
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Old 11-19-2021, 03:45 PM
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Instead of adding to the summer air you should have replaced it with winter air, but yes get them all to 35 psi.
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Old 11-19-2021, 03:50 PM
BobbyRust BobbyRust is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Da' Walleye Assassun View Post
Every 10 degree change in air temperature is about 1 psi difference in tire pressure. Check the tire pressure when the tires are cold at the lowest air temperature. Those pencil type gauges are not accurate. Buy a dial type gauge of good quality.https://radaryonline.pl/lotniska-w-polsce/
Yes, that is the definite truth. Rather, the tire makers anticipated it and it is written what pressure to pump. Unless I'm wrong.
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Old 11-19-2021, 03:58 PM
Thalweg Thalweg is online now
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Assuming that the tires are the same size, load rating and speed rating that originally came on the truck, I go with what is on the door of my half ton (35 PSI). The truck GVWR, GCWR, etc. ratings are based upon the recommended PSI. At one point I ran the tire rated PSI (44 lbs), loaded and unloaded, and I ended up with excessive wear in the center tire tread. The higher than needed pressure caused the center of the tire to expand and put most of the load on the center treads (corresponding load was not there to push it back to "flat"). Plus the ride was a lot rougher.
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Old 11-19-2021, 04:12 PM
REW REW is online now
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Particularly at the beginning of the cold season, I always add 4 psi to the normal 32 or 35 psi that I carry in my tires.

As another poster mentioned, when the temperature drops to -20F - the pressure in the tire will drop. The typical change is 1.5 degree loss in pressure for every 4 degrees F change in temperature.

So, lets say that the temperature in the afternoon this fall day is +40F.

However, there is a forecast ahead that says that the temperature is going to fall to -20F

+40 to -20F is a 60 degree temperature change for the tire.

Then, we get a change of 1.5 degrees for every 10 degrees.

That means that we will lose 1.5 degrees x 6 to find the new pressure .
The pressure loss will be 9 psi.

So, if you normally inflate your tires to 35 psi on a +40F day, but want to be prepared for a -20F day, you need to increase your air pressure at +40F to 35 plus 9 or 44 psi.

--------------
This is the reason that I normally inflate my tires to 40psi at the beginning of the winter season because we will see 0 or a bit less quite frequently, but we will seldom get to anything much colder until late in the winter.

----------------------
However, if I were an ice fisherman and was going to take my trip north to Canada, or near the USA border, I would then, go from the normal 35 psi, to 45 psi before leaving home to be safe if the temperature drops to -20 or more in the dark of a January night.

Best wishes all.

p.s.
Newer vehicles have tire pressure monitors and if you have the right vehicle you will have a psi display of each tires inflation pressure. So, if you do get up one frigid morning, and your air pressure is indicating sub 30 or less, then by all means bring up the tires to their recommended tire pressure - as indicated on your dash gauges for air pressure, or by the accurate gauge that you use for your tires air pressure.

------------------------------
Note:
For quick and easy inflation purposes for my vehicle, I purchased a tire pressure inflation unit to fit on the end of my air compressor. The original gauge read 0-300 psi, which made the gauge essentially useless. So, I removed that gauge and then installed a 270 degree gauge that went from 0-50 which makes it trivial to use and very easy to read:

https://www.harborfreight.com/pistol...tire+inflation

But, I removed the gauge from the unit and replaced the gauge with one similar to this one:
https://www.menards.com/main/tools/p...8360986&ipos=5

Or, one of these glycerin filled gauges that do not bounce in use:
https://www.northerntool.com/shop/to...ct_48296_48296

Or a milton gauge:
https://www.northerntool.com/shop/to...1290_200901290

Here is a digital tire inflator with the long reach for dual truck tires:
https://www.northerntool.com/shop/to...3649_200733649

Here is a Milton tire inflator - which may be made in America.
https://www.northerntool.com/shop/to...9922_200899922

Depending on the inflator that you purchase and if you wish to switch gauges, you need to be aware that if you purchase an imported inflator tool that the threads on the gauge may be metric, which would require rethreading if you wished to use a US made gauge with english threads.

Note:
If you wished to go digital, here is a 1% accuracy with a large display, a 0-60 psi range and illuminated for dark pressure sessions.
https://www.amazon.com/Pressure-Conn...7361157&sr=8-8

I expect that the Milton tire tool listed above, if you wished to swap gauges, most of the ones listed above use a 1/4 npt thread which will fit the Milton tool.


Take care

Last edited by REW; 11-19-2021 at 04:35 PM.
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