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  #1  
Old 08-12-2021, 07:55 AM
Bill Krejca Bill Krejca is offline
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Default UV Coating VS Luminous

A friend gave me some jig heads with which he said he out-fished several companions. Looking up specifics, I discovered the heads were coated with a previously coated UV solution at the factory. Thinking this might be worth trying on other tackle, I then began wondering whether a luminous coating would be equal/superior/same. That is, if a somewhat better visibility attribute was better catching, would a much higher visibility attribute be even a better fish catcher. Assumption: Luminous is better seen by fish, and supposedly walleyes can better see UV, crappies cannot (from what I have read).

The first thing I though of several years ago when approached by a factory rep was, "How do I know the product is actually coated, as apparently humans can't distinguish its presence?" Sorta like the Emperor's new clothing, eh?

What say you?

Bill
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  #2  
Old 08-12-2021, 09:24 AM
Custom Eyes Custom Eyes is offline
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Originally Posted by Bill Krejca View Post
A friend gave me some jig heads with which he said he out-fished several companions. Looking up specifics, I discovered the heads were coated with a previously coated UV solution at the factory. Thinking this might be worth trying on other tackle, I then began wondering whether a luminous coating would be equal/superior/same. That is, if a somewhat better visibility attribute was better catching, would a much higher visibility attribute be even a better fish catcher. Assumption: Luminous is better seen by fish, and supposedly walleyes can better see UV, crappies cannot (from what I have read).

The first thing I though of several years ago when approached by a factory rep was, "How do I know the product is actually coated, as apparently humans can't distinguish its presence?" Sorta like the Emperor's new clothing, eh?

What say you?

Bill
I invented UV on fishing lures, so hopefully I can give you some insight. We're all pretty familiar with luminous glow coatings. They need to be charged and project light in a variety of colors. Generally, regardless of glow color, they project a pretty wide light spectrum band, which does vary color to color. UV doesn't need and cannot be charged. It's actually a chemical reaction with the pigment in the coating and the narrow UV band of the light spectrum that is hitting it. You take away that light source and the lure stops glowing immediately. Basically, it intensifies that narrow band in the blue-violet part of the light spectrum and then projects that intensified part of the spectrum out. Not all UV pigments are the same though. They project out different wavelengths within that narrow blue-violet part of the light spectrum. Some are more blue in color, some more toward the violet end. We use them in our chemical products at work so computer scanning "eyes" can tell if a product was made correctly, applied correctly, or the proper product was used, so there are a number of different wavelengths that are available. From personal experience, manufacturer's "UV" coatings are a joke and barely even visible. Some even try to call regular fluorescent paints "UV". The pigment is very expensive and they try to use as little as possible. One way to check if a lure is actually coated in REAL UV pigment is to hit it with a black light, like in my attached pic. You can distinctly see the blue-violet glow coming off it. If the colors just look more intensified, but lack that blue-violet glow, it's just plain ole fluorescent paint. Intensity of the real UV pigment glow is going to vary greatly, depending on water clarity, water color, and available blue-violet light available. They excel in gin clear water like we have here in northern Lake Huron. The second they hit that nice aqua blue water, they light right up, and will continue to get brighter as the lure gets deeper and the other non-blue to violet parts of the spectrum of available light is filtered out. They reach their peak glow at a depth where nearly every part of the light spectrum is filtered out besides the blue-violet part. Like I just mentioned, that is going to vary water to water and day to day. And yes, different fish do seem to react to that UV glow differently. Salmon, trout, walleye, and pike seem to key in on it the most. Other species, seems not so much. I have charter captains up here that have 100's of hours experimenting with the exact same patterns on the same waters on a spoon, one UV coated and one non-UV coated. Hands down and indisputable, the UV coated lures trigger far more strikes for salmon and trout than non. Pretty much the same with walleye.

As you can see in the pics, the veggies lures I just painted the other day have that distinct blue glow to them when hit with a black light, even over the base colors. Notice how the chartreuse now looks green from the blue UV pigment adding to the color. REAL UV coatings with the proper load of UV pigment, can be seen without a black light. The pic of the back side of the spoons glowing blue is just in sunlight with no artificial black light used. The ONLY factory lures I have ever seen glow in sunlight are the Storm UV series of lures. Any others are severely lacking in UV pigment or are a fraud, calling fluorescent or glow pigment "UV".
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Last edited by Custom Eyes; 08-12-2021 at 09:35 AM.
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  #3  
Old 08-12-2021, 01:58 PM
Bill Krejca Bill Krejca is offline
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C E - Thanks for the info, guess it maybe is a quasi review of one of your earlier informationals. I tested out the acquired heads under a black light, and they do glow quite nicely, maybe a little in natural light, but not nearly to the extent of your above samples. The jigs are CPI's Tail Lights. My painted luminous heads also glow nicely in the black light.

So, it seems that Storm is the only real player in the UV category, and I am not aware that Storm is pushing the product, as far as I know. Cost of the UV product, as you point out, must be substantially high enough for other manufacturers not "to make the plunge" so to speak. How about some of the labeled UV coating solutions advertised - Are they any good?

So, back to luminous paint, being aware that for most bright, needs to be hit regularly with a bright light. A lower brightness does occur with just being exposed to sunlight, tho.

Thanks for your sharing.

Bill
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  #4  
Old 08-12-2021, 03:28 PM
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gbin gbin is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Custom Eyes View Post
I invented UV on fishing lures, so hopefully I can give you some insight. We're all pretty familiar with luminous glow coatings. They need to be charged and project light in a variety of colors. Generally, regardless of glow color, they project a pretty wide light spectrum band, which does vary color to color. UV doesn't need and cannot be charged. It's actually a chemical reaction with the pigment in the coating and the narrow UV band of the light spectrum that is hitting it. You take away that light source and the lure stops glowing immediately. Basically, it intensifies that narrow band in the blue-violet part of the light spectrum and then projects that intensified part of the spectrum out. Not all UV pigments are the same though. They project out different wavelengths within that narrow blue-violet part of the light spectrum. Some are more blue in color, some more toward the violet end. We use them in our chemical products at work so computer scanning "eyes" can tell if a product was made correctly, applied correctly, or the proper product was used, so there are a number of different wavelengths that are available. From personal experience, manufacturer's "UV" coatings are a joke and barely even visible. Some even try to call regular fluorescent paints "UV". The pigment is very expensive and they try to use as little as possible. One way to check if a lure is actually coated in REAL UV pigment is to hit it with a black light, like in my attached pic. You can distinctly see the blue-violet glow coming off it. If the colors just look more intensified, but lack that blue-violet glow, it's just plain ole fluorescent paint. Intensity of the real UV pigment glow is going to vary greatly, depending on water clarity, water color, and available blue-violet light available. They excel in gin clear water like we have here in northern Lake Huron. The second they hit that nice aqua blue water, they light right up, and will continue to get brighter as the lure gets deeper and the other non-blue to violet parts of the spectrum of available light is filtered out. They reach their peak glow at a depth where nearly every part of the light spectrum is filtered out besides the blue-violet part. Like I just mentioned, that is going to vary water to water and day to day. And yes, different fish do seem to react to that UV glow differently. Salmon, trout, walleye, and pike seem to key in on it the most. Other species, seems not so much. I have charter captains up here that have 100's of hours experimenting with the exact same patterns on the same waters on a spoon, one UV coated and one non-UV coated. Hands down and indisputable, the UV coated lures trigger far more strikes for salmon and trout than non. Pretty much the same with walleye.

As you can see in the pics, the veggies lures I just painted the other day have that distinct blue glow to them when hit with a black light, even over the base colors. Notice how the chartreuse now looks green from the blue UV pigment adding to the color. REAL UV coatings with the proper load of UV pigment, can be seen without a black light. The pic of the back side of the spoons glowing blue is just in sunlight with no artificial black light used. The ONLY factory lures I have ever seen glow in sunlight are the Storm UV series of lures. Any others are severely lacking in UV pigment or are a fraud, calling fluorescent or glow pigment "UV".
Talk about getting it straight from the horse's mouth! Wow! Thanks a lot for sharing all of that!

Do you (or does anyone else here) know, do various prey species of freshwater fish put on UV displays? Lots of animals (including fish) do so for intraspecific purposes such as species recognition, mating and territoriality. If a predator keys in on something, there's generally a good reason. If it hasn't been looked at yet by folks who make fishing lures, it sure should be. Next time I go smelting I'm bringing a black light!

Gerry
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  #5  
Old 08-12-2021, 04:36 PM
Custom Eyes Custom Eyes is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Krejca View Post
C E - Thanks for the info, guess it maybe is a quasi review of one of your earlier informationals. I tested out the acquired heads under a black light, and they do glow quite nicely, maybe a little in natural light, but not nearly to the extent of your above samples. The jigs are CPI's Tail Lights. My painted luminous heads also glow nicely in the black light.

So, it seems that Storm is the only real player in the UV category, and I am not aware that Storm is pushing the product, as far as I know. Cost of the UV product, as you point out, must be substantially high enough for other manufacturers not "to make the plunge" so to speak. How about some of the labeled UV coating solutions advertised - Are they any good?

So, back to luminous paint, being aware that for most bright, needs to be hit regularly with a bright light. A lower brightness does occur with just being exposed to sunlight, tho.

Thanks for your sharing.

Bill
I think one of the things keeping other manufacturers from getting into it is the availability of actual good quality UV clear coats. The CSI UV Blast is OK. Probably the only one I would recommend, but I do that very hesitantly because it's not really that great. Thankfully, being a paint and coatings chemist for a good part of my career, I manufacture my own and can dictate how much UV pigment I want in it and in what type of paint system, with cost not being much of a factor in the application processes I use. The spoons in the pics is the powder clear coat version of UV that I formulated and make at home. I also have a liquid spray version and an epoxy clear coat, depending on what I'm coating with it. I know Createx/AutoAir makes a UV coating, but have never seen or tried it myself. Any of the commercially available ones aren't too durable either and need a good top coat over them for enhanced durability.


Luminous and UV paints each have their advantages and disadvantages. Glow needs to be constantly recharged and fades fairly quickly. UV doesn't need charged and maintains a consistent brightness endlessly in given water and light conditions. Glow definitely has the advantage at night when light that would illuminate the UV reaction isn't available. UV will light up pretty good in the right moon light conditions, but won't light up as deep as glow pigment. Glow pigments do wear out over time, but UV lasts virtually forever.
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  #6  
Old 08-12-2021, 04:38 PM
Custom Eyes Custom Eyes is offline
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Originally Posted by gbin View Post
Talk about getting it straight from the horse's mouth! Wow! Thanks a lot for sharing all of that!

Do you (or does anyone else here) know, do various prey species of freshwater fish put on UV displays? Lots of animals (including fish) do so for intraspecific purposes such as species recognition, mating and territoriality. If a predator keys in on something, there's generally a good reason. If it hasn't been looked at yet by folks who make fishing lures, it sure should be. Next time I go smelting I'm bringing a black light!

Gerry
I have seen some freshwater fish that have UV luminescence to them, but that are aquarium fish. Not sure about any wild fish out in nature. Would be a good experiment though to see!
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  #7  
Old 08-12-2021, 06:12 PM
Paul H Paul H is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Custom Eyes View Post
I have seen some freshwater fish that have UV luminescence to them, but that are aquarium fish. Not sure about any wild fish out in nature. Would be a good experiment though to see!
I remember some coating that was sold 20 years ago, give or take. Pretty sure it was not a glow, but could be wrong. Was kind of a milky white color. I just remember adding to jigs.
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Old 09-02-2021, 04:32 AM
Gary Korsgaden Gary Korsgaden is offline
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Default Brighten Up

I like any added attraction I can get. Using UV blast sprayed on my crank baits does a good job accomplishing
additional brightness and attraction.
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  #9  
Old 09-03-2021, 01:38 PM
Bob/MN Bob/MN is offline
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I like any added attraction I can get. Using UV blast sprayed on my crank baits does a good job accomplishing
additional brightness and attraction.

Gary:


All of my painted home mades have a final coat of UV Blast.
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