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  #11  
Old 12-02-2019, 03:27 PM
Custom Eyes Custom Eyes is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lazy Ike View Post
I agree but I was not talking Enterprise level Cybersecurity more so someone struggling to recall and a way to help without a full MFA plan.
I use the Notepad method on my personal computers for purely the simplicity of it. Every time I sign up for site, I just open that .txt file and enter the site name, user name, pwd, hit save, and done. Simple as:

Walleye Central
Custom Eyes
Passwordxxxxx
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  #12  
Old 12-02-2019, 04:46 PM
DW DW is online now
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I recommend you do a thorough comparison of password managers and read reviews. I have about 125 passwords so a manager is important simply to handle the volume. Every password I have is unique. The password Manager data file is encrypted so it canít be read. The software and data are stored on my local devices. Good managers will provide options for storage. Mine is set up to sync between devices only via my secure WiFi network so the data is backed up but is not stored in the cloud, or sent via the web which is vulnerable. Since it is only on protected local devices, and not in the cloud, it is about as hackproof as can be. Access to the manager is by my own, complex password which I memorized, and by fingerprint access. All very secure but very easy to use.
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  #13  
Old 12-02-2019, 05:34 PM
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Pokey Fisherman Pokey Fisherman is offline
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I had a minor hacking scare but it wasn't a big deal but it woke me up and I changed how I handled passwords to protect myself going forward. I was one of those that used the same password on multiple web sites so I could remember them. I went to unique complex long passwords and I saved them to a encrypted Excel file stored on a thumb drive so the file is not on my computer. My bank, Paypal and Amazon have 2 level authentication security with password and text code. I use a VPN all the time especially when I travel. I had a laptop infected from a bad WiFi at a hotel.
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  #14  
Old 12-05-2019, 06:58 PM
Anonymouse Anonymouse is offline
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Anonymouse's 1st rool of the interweebz:

If you have something you want kept secret, NEVER - EVER - put it on a computer or the interweebz.
Someday, somehow, somewhere, someone, WILL get access to it - and you can take that to the bank.

In the case of usernames and passwords - which, by definition, end up being used on a computer - NEVER - EVER - allow those to be saved.
(Your computer probably asks you every time you use them.)
They get stored in a set of 3 files in your browser profile and anyone who can get access to your box can simply open them or copy them and open them on a different box.
• key3.db (pre-Firefox 56.0)
or key4.db (Firefox 56.0-current)
• logins.json
• signons.sqlite
Other browsers use similar files, though Anonymouse isn't currently up on those exact file naming schemes because he doesn't use other browsers very often.

There is no such thing as "computer security" on your machine.
Any determined hacker CAN & WILL get access to administrative rights on it (and sNorton is probably one of the LAST anti-viral/security softwares Anonymouse would ever use - even if there was no other ones in existance).
The ONLY thing protecting your stuff is the shear number of targets and the fact that YOUR crap is probably not worth 10 seconds of the hacker's kiddie script time - let alone the application of his true skillset.
You, as an individual compooter user, are effectively invisible to hackers by virtue of large numbers (1 among billions) unless you happen to pish one off and bring yourself to his/her/their attention.

If you NEED to save usernames and passwords, the most secure method is to type them into a notepad file and save that file OFF the machine entirely - either on a USB stick, a rewritable optical disc, or an external HDD or floppy drive.
(Yes, Anonymouse STILL has a floppy drive on every computer he builds - largely BECAUSE nobody uses those silly things anymore and probably can't even read one on their machine.)
DO NOT - EVER - STORE USERNAMES & PASSWORDS IN THE CLOUD !!!

Typically Anonymouse (or some variation on Anonymous) has a few rotating usernames and passwords he uses on almost every web site that doesn't require any real security - like WalleyeCentral, for example.
Does Anonymouse REALLY care if his account here is hacked?
Not enough to bother with a unique combo of username & password from say, UW Badgers football on 24/7 Sports, that's for sure.
Anonymouse's banking accounts or other more important sites - yeah, you dang betcha Anonymouse uses the most unbelieveably complicated passwords - so complicated they are nearly impossible to commit to memory & are written on actual paper to be read only with the Mark-I eyeball.
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  #15  
Old 12-07-2019, 07:50 AM
richg99 richg99 is offline
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Good post.

I read someplace that it is the LENGTH of the password that is more important than the complexity of the Password.

i.e. MazdaFordPlymouthDesotoYugo is a better password than !#47$)!*$

Is that true?
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  #16  
Old 12-07-2019, 08:19 AM
Ozark Bob Ozark Bob is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by richg99 View Post
Good post.

I read someplace that it is the LENGTH of the password that is more important than the complexity of the Password.

i.e. MazdaFordPlymouthDesotoYugo is a better password than !#47$)!*$

Is that true?
Probably but by adding special characters it and numbers is the ideal situation.
Just wanted to mention, Do not have a written or typed password document laying around in a drawer or somewhere else!
https://www.cnet.com/news/best-passw...gers-for-2019/

Last edited by Ozark Bob; 12-07-2019 at 09:09 AM.
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  #17  
Old 12-07-2019, 08:49 AM
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Pokey Fisherman Pokey Fisherman is offline
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Yes that is right. The longer the password the longer it will take. The hacker uses a program that tries every combination of every character starting with with the shortest and keeps going longer. Every time you add a character it increases the time to cover all the possibilities exponentially to the point it takes too long. This is the reason your seeing those "Verify that I'm a human" puzzles on sign in pages to keep automated systems from getting in or if you fail the sign in so many times in a row your locked out for a while.



The bulk of the hackings come from them getting your password from data breaches at large companies were one hack can get them data on many customers or from your own computer if you open a bad attachment or visit a questionable web site or are on a public WiFi with a bad actor waiting on it.
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  #18  
Old 12-07-2019, 08:51 AM
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yarcraft91 yarcraft91 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Baseline View Post
I use the Norton password manager. It allows you to have a unique complicated password for all your accounts and website registrations. There is always a chance of a hacker, but it is far less of a chance with Norton than sites like Walleye Central or retail establishments. Most people still have one or two passwords that they use for banking and other accounts. Once a password is obtained the hackers start working on your other accounts. Having a unique password for all you accounts and site registrations prevents this. Besides if you don't have confidence in Norton their would be no reason to purchase their services.
I believe there is truth in that statement. Personally, I have different usernames and passwords for every one of my financial accounts and change the passwords at least annually. It is possible to manage a large number of different security credentials without exposing them to hackers- just store them on something that cannot be accessed by a network.
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  #19  
Old 12-08-2019, 06:03 AM
Bugler Bugler is offline
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Norton is simply trying to see you an additional package. I was a Norton user for over a decade until they went downhill. I got fed up with it saying it found a problem but then it would not fix the problem. Instead, I had to go in and edit the registry and fix things myself. If a person was not good at those types of things, they could really make their computers inoperable. However, even my current protection program still tries to sell me add on packages, including just yesterday, a password storage system.
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