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winterizing a garage refrigerator with an ice maker. - Walleye Message Central
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  #1  
Old 10-13-2019, 09:07 AM
Cold Front Illinois Cold Front Illinois is offline
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Default winterizing a garage refrigerator with an ice maker.

I have a refrigerator in my garage at the lake house. Not worried about the refrigerator freezing, but I do have the ice maker working during the summer.

I can drain the ice maker lines so the they don't freeze. I can unhook them but not sure they will completely drain, but should drain enough. I am really concerned about the valve assembly. I have purchased a refrigerator in the spring one year where a guy had it in his garage for the winter and that valve assembly had cracks in it when I went and hooked it up. I am thinking anti freeze won't be a good idea.


Thanks
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  #2  
Old 10-13-2019, 09:33 AM
Huntindave Huntindave is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cold Front Illinois View Post
I have a refrigerator in my garage at the lake house. Not worried about the refrigerator freezing, but I do have the ice maker working during the summer.

I can drain the ice maker lines so the they don't freeze. I can unhook them but not sure they will completely drain, but should drain enough. I am really concerned about the valve assembly. I have purchased a refrigerator in the spring one year where a guy had it in his garage for the winter and that valve assembly had cracks in it when I went and hooked it up. I am thinking anti freeze won't be a good idea.


Thanks
What type of anti-freeze? Folks with travel trailers and RV's use a non-poisonous food compatible antifreeze in their water systems when storing their equipment. It is especially made just for this purpose. Should work for you.
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Old 10-13-2019, 09:34 AM
REW REW is offline
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Cold,

Turn off the water and drain the lines. Then, have the ice maker cycle a few times. The cycling of the ice maker will open and close the lines and with the line disconnected, any water will drain from the valve and the lines.

Take care
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  #4  
Old 10-13-2019, 09:36 AM
REW REW is offline
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Or, you can go to the back of the refrigerator.
Disconnect the water valve from the refrigerator, turn it upside down and drain all of the water and then with no water connected, replace the valve and reattach the shut off water lines.

This is normally only about a 5 minute job if you wish to go this far.


Take care
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Old 10-13-2019, 09:58 AM
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Pokey Fisherman Pokey Fisherman is online now
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Rather that using a antifreeze I would hook it up to compressed air and turn it on. You will know it blow out the water when you hear air blowing through it. To be on the safe side I would fill the air tank to a max pressure of 60 psi or set the regulator on your compressor which is the normal high pressure of a well since they might have used plastic lines in it. If you use RV antifreeze it will take a while to get the taste out of the ice maker and you will need to pump it through it.
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Old 10-13-2019, 10:46 AM
NailsWI NailsWI is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pokey Fisherman View Post
Rather that using a antifreeze I would hook it up to compressed air and turn it on. You will know it blow out the water when you hear air blowing through it. To be on the safe side I would fill the air tank to a max pressure of 60 psi or set the regulator on your compressor which is the normal high pressure of a well since they might have used plastic lines in it. If you use RV antifreeze it will take a while to get the taste out of the ice maker and you will need to pump it through it.

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Old 10-13-2019, 10:58 AM
REW REW is offline
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The problem that you have with compressed air and have the line still connected to the refrigerator with the refrigerator just sitting there is that the valve is closed and blowing air against a closed valve is like whistling dixie in a snow storm in the middle of Alaska. It is not going to do any good.

If, on the other hand, if a source of air is attached to the line and then the refrigerator ice maker cycles so that the valve opens up, the valve will be clear of water and safe for storage.

I had virtually the identical thing happen to me one winter in my motor home.
I used compressed air to blow the lines and at each faucet, opened the faucet until the faucet ran with air only and no water.

However, I did not cycle the toilet valve in the bathroom. The short line going to the bathroom came out just fine, since I had cycled the cold side of the bathroom sink, which cleared that supply line to the sink. But off of that line was the T that went to the toilet and its valve.

The following spring when I turned on the water, I found that the toilet valve had cracked and broken from not opening the valve to let the line and the valve blow clear of water until only water comes out.

--------------------
So, to go back to the refrigerator, just insure that the valve cycles with the water lines disconnected so that the water can drain out, or if compressed air is connected - so that the air can come clear through the water valve into the ice box of the refrigerator.

--------------------
Also, copy the comment to NOT to use RV antifreeze in the line. Yes, it will work, but the after taste and flushing of the lines and valves become an issue in the spring.

Take care
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Old 10-13-2019, 01:26 PM
NailsWI NailsWI is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by REW View Post
The problem that you have with compressed air and have the line still connected to the refrigerator with the refrigerator just sitting there is that the valve is closed and blowing air against a closed valve is like whistling dixie in a snow storm in the middle of Alaska. It is not going to do any good.

If, on the other hand, if a source of air is attached to the line and then the refrigerator ice maker cycles so that the valve opens up, the valve will be clear of water and safe for storage.

I had virtually the identical thing happen to me one winter in my motor home.
I used compressed air to blow the lines and at each faucet, opened the faucet until the faucet ran with air only and no water.

However, I did not cycle the toilet valve in the bathroom. The short line going to the bathroom came out just fine, since I had cycled the cold side of the bathroom sink, which cleared that supply line to the sink. But off of that line was the T that went to the toilet and its valve.

The following spring when I turned on the water, I found that the toilet valve had cracked and broken from not opening the valve to let the line and the valve blow clear of water until only water comes out.



--------------------
So, to go back to the refrigerator, just insure that the valve cycles with the water lines disconnected so that the water can drain out, or if compressed air is connected - so that the air can come clear through the water valve into the ice box of the refrigerator.

--------------------
Also, copy the comment to NOT to use RV antifreeze in the line. Yes, it will work, but the after taste and flushing of the lines and valves become an issue in the spring.

Take care
Do you ever read a post before you respond pretending to know it all. Pokey Fisherman clearly stated to connect the air line, turn on fridge and verify air flow through the ice maker confirming the solenoid had opened.
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  #9  
Old 10-13-2019, 02:18 PM
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REW,
That is what I meant by turn it on. Turn on the refrigerator and let it try to make ice. When you hear the air blowing through your done. I figure most people have some common sense about this if they are going to do it themselves.
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Old 10-13-2019, 04:34 PM
REW REW is offline
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Pokey,
Sorry for the misunderstanding.

When I read, "turn it on", I though that you were referring to the valve on the air supply, not the refrigerator.

Take care.
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