Home   |  Message Board   |  Information   |  Classifieds   |  Features   |  Video  |  Boat Reviews  |  Boat DIY
New panfish regs in Minnesota - Walleye Message Central
Walleye Message Central

Go Back   Walleye Message Central > Walleye Message Central > General Discussion

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 10-28-2020, 11:57 AM
kzoofisher's Avatar
kzoofisher kzoofisher is online now
Wallhanger
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Kalamazoo, Mi
Posts: 3,803
Default New panfish regs in Minnesota

Proposed only and looking for public opinion


Subscribe
Sign In
up next
2 Stearns residents, 1 Benton resident die of COVID-19
9 Stearns County lakes may see sunfish limits cut to boost size of bluegills

SARAH KOCHER | ST. CLOUD TIMES | 3:59 pm CDT October 26, 2020

Nine Stearns County lakes may have a lower sunfish limit put in place this spring if public opinion shows its favor.


The proposed limits, set out in the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources' Quality Bluegill Initiative, are lake-specific in an effort to help improve the size of bluegills.

According to the DNR, feedback from anglers shows they're satisfied with the number of sunfish, but are increasingly concerned about sunfish size. And, statewide, anglers tend to be more supportive of individual lake management efforts than a statewide change in the limit (which sits at 20 sunfish).

Ten-fish bag limits generally help maintain size quality, while five-fish bag limits generally improve size quality, Grand Rapids Area Fisheries Supervisor David Weitzel said in a recorded presentation about the initiative. Weitzel is co-chair of the DNR's panfish technical committee.


Weitzel said when humans selectively remove large fish, sunfish populations typically respond by producing smaller, slow-growing fish. They spawn smaller and younger. And catching and keeping large male bluegills improves the condition for smaller males to proliferate, Weitzel said.



"Size has declined while abundance has increased," Weitzel said. "Both are biological signs that too much harvest has occurred to maintain fisheries with good size quality."

Lakes in Stearns County that could have a reduced bag limit include:

Becker Lake

Bolfing Lake

Cedar Island Lake

Great Northern Lake

Horseshoe Lake

Knaus Lake

Krays Lake

Schneider Lake

Zumwalde Lake

Last edited by mr ducks; 10-28-2020 at 01:20 PM. Reason: Spam content
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
  #2  
Old 10-29-2020, 10:59 AM
feesh007 feesh007 is offline
Minnow
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Posts: 26
Default

I hope MN would consider max size limits instead of min size limits, at least as part of a study. I'm happy to keep a couple 14" eyes and let everything over 18" go back to produce more, and the same with panfish. Muskie anglers lead the way here - releasing the biggest fish with the best genes for decades has led to great opportunities for us now.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 10-29-2020, 12:27 PM
RJR RJR is offline
Minnow
 
Join Date: Apr 2020
Location: Regina, SK
Posts: 68
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by feesh007 View Post
I hope MN would consider max size limits instead of min size limits, at least as part of a study. I'm happy to keep a couple 14" eyes and let everything over 18" go back to produce more, and the same with panfish. Muskie anglers lead the way here - releasing the biggest fish with the best genes for decades has led to great opportunities for us now.

Releasing big fish is part of the reason many of our walleye fisheries in Canada are continually so good, especially on highly pressured lakes. Same can be said for most good Muskie lakes in the US and Canada.



For example, we have a province-wide slot where I live that allows you to have 4 walleyes in your possession, but only 1 can be over 21.5"... basically just exists to stop people from keeping their limit of 4-6 pounders. It essentially forces people to keep eater-sized fish if they choose to keep any.
Additionally, one lake has special regs where you cannot keep any fish over 21.5". Ironically, the lake with that regulation is home to both the ice and open water provincial record walleyes, as well as the ice fishing world record walleye.



The MN DNR bios seem to finally have this right. If you want an increase in fish size, then (generally) you want to lower limits and reduce the harvest of big breeder fish, but still allow people to take small ones. If you simply want to increase numbers of fish, then by all means, take out the big breeders and you'll have boatloads of smaller fish swimming around.



RJR
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
  #4  
Old 10-29-2020, 12:58 PM
Burr Burr is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Nov 1999
Location: Moorhead, MN, USA.
Posts: 8,515
Default

Sunfish are an interesting species. Once the big sunfish are depleted from a water body, it's very hard to get them back.

It was explained to me, Sunfish continue to grow until they reach maturity, maturity is defined as when they start to reproduce. Once a Sunfish starts to reproduce, growth slows to a snails pace.

The largest Male sunfish will out-compete smaller Sunfish to reproduce - and that is what allows Sunfish to reach the larger size. When the smaller sunfish are the biggest in the system, and start reproducing - they stop growing, don't reach the large size that is desired by anglers.

Add onto that, there are specific times of the year when reproducing sunfish are vulnerable to over-harvest, are schooled concentrations in the reproductive areas. That is when a large Sunfish population are susceptible to over-harvest.

Setting bag limits is one way, but if more people understood what causes stunted Sunfish populations and exercised some restraint, it would be helpful to the overall size of sunfish in a body of water.

Let the kids be kids until they actually grow up, or they never do grow up.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 10-29-2020, 02:41 PM
Ozark Bob Ozark Bob is online now
Wallhanger
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Lakeview, Arkansas, USA.
Posts: 4,097
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Burr View Post
Sunfish are an interesting species. Once the big sunfish are depleted from a water body, it's very hard to get them back.

It was explained to me, Sunfish continue to grow until they reach maturity, maturity is defined as when they start to reproduce. Once a Sunfish starts to reproduce, growth slows to a snails pace.

The largest Male sunfish will out-compete smaller Sunfish to reproduce - and that is what allows Sunfish to reach the larger size. When the smaller sunfish are the biggest in the system, and start reproducing - they stop growing, don't reach the large size that is desired by anglers.

Add onto that, there are specific times of the year when reproducing sunfish are vulnerable to over-harvest, are schooled concentrations in the reproductive areas. That is when a large Sunfish population are susceptible to over-harvest.

Setting bag limits is one way, but if more people understood what causes stunted Sunfish populations and exercised some restraint, it would be helpful to the overall size of sunfish in a body of water.

Let the kids be kids until they actually grow up, or they never do grow up.
Totally agree, except restraint and common sense seems to be in short supply as well. Bob
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 10-29-2020, 03:08 PM
cutting edge
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

I agree with all of the above....
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 07:56 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.