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  #1  
Old 04-12-2021, 10:23 AM
MarbleEyez MarbleEyez is offline
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Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 22
Default Jackplates: Ranger 621

I have a 17' Ranger 621 with a 350 Verado on it. I'm wanting to gain a little more speed. I've spun a 21P Bravo and a 23P Bravo. I'll get 56-56MPH with the 21P at around 6200RPM, 23P Bravo is 57-59MPH around 6000RPM. I tried a 23P Rev 4 and it wouldn't get up on plane, it would just blow it out.

Several guys that I've talked to are getting 61-62MPH with a 23P Bravo on their 621's, both have jack plates. Same elevation and running conditions.

What are you guys seeing for RPM and Speed out of your 621's with Jack Plates? What size of Jack Plate? I looked at Bob's and I see they have a 6" and a 8" hydraulic jack plate. What's the pro's and con's on a 6" vs 8"? Parking space for the added length isn't a problem with my situation.
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  #2  
Old 04-12-2021, 03:48 PM
kswalleyer kswalleyer is offline
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Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: Kansas City
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MarbleEyez View Post
I have a 17' Ranger 621 with a 350 Verado on it. I'm wanting to gain a little more speed. I've spun a 21P Bravo and a 23P Bravo. I'll get 56-56MPH with the 21P at around 6200RPM, 23P Bravo is 57-59MPH around 6000RPM. I tried a 23P Rev 4 and it wouldn't get up on plane, it would just blow it out.

Several guys that I've talked to are getting 61-62MPH with a 23P Bravo on their 621's, both have jack plates. Same elevation and running conditions.

What are you guys seeing for RPM and Speed out of your 621's with Jack Plates? What size of Jack Plate? I looked at Bob's and I see they have a 6" and a 8" hydraulic jack plate. What's the pro's and con's on a 6" vs 8"? Parking space for the added length isn't a problem with my situation.
same as above, atlas jackplate
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2014 Ranger 119/Mercury 225 Pro XS Optimax
4 Rivers Refuge Runners/PPF Woodduck Mud Motors
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  #3  
Old 04-12-2021, 07:45 PM
REW REW is offline
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Join Date: Nov 1999
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Posts: 39,027
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With a good hull and a good motor - a full time adjustable jack plate always is a good idea.

There are many reasons to have a jack plate - besides a different speed.

Even if you gain no speed at all, the jack plate is still very very useful for many different boating situations.

For example -
Best hole shot - drop the motor all of the way down and trim all of the way in. As your speed builds, both lift the motor and trim the motor out until you are right on the edge.

You hit wind and waves, and start to get prop venting - drop the motor until the prop stays hooked up

But, when it is dead smooth and you are going to make a long run - put on the highest pitch prop that will work with your motor and drop the motor, and tuck in the motor.

Then, after you hit the throttle and began to lift the motor and trim the motor out. If you are running a really tall pitch on the prop - it might take a while to get on plane and really get ripping. But, under the conditions of smooth water and many a mile to run, keep lifting the motor and trimming the motor out - until you have every thing fully optimized. Then, pull the throttle back to a more economical run for a 100 mile run and continue to tweak the trim and motor height to get the very best speed at the rpm you choose to run - with the higher pitch prop that you have on the motor for making these very long runs. If you can run 2-4 more inches of prop - and after getting on plane - be able to back off on the throttle 500-1000 rpm and still maintain the speed that you would have with the motor running flat out with a lesser pitch prop -- you will be really upping the fuel economy of the motor and reducing its overall cost of operation.

Get the jack plate and don't look back.

Best wishes
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  #4  
Old 04-12-2021, 08:22 PM
muskyed muskyed is offline
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Join Date: Oct 2015
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Pros-easy to dial in correct engine height for the props you have, or should be using, a little more bow lift with less trim, if that's what you want. Also ability to raise engine in shallow water and also raise engine at boat launches. That can be really helpful in launches with a lot of gravel where it can get sucked into your prop when power loading.
Cons- garage space, trailering can possibly go slightly out of balance if you are not able to adjust winch stand forward a bit. This can lead to the back of the trailer wanting to wag at times, especially if you make quick steering wheel moves. The more you set the engine back, the greater the tendency for the boat to want to porpoise. I think Ranger supplies a 6" when ordered with a jackplate. I would also seriously consider a 4", as it would give you the adjustability you want, with minimal chance for side effects. I think 6000 rpm is too low for your engine. Most I hear that run well seem to be in the 6150-6300 rpm range. Your 22 would probably work fine if your engine was up one hole with what you have now. Your boat has quite a bit of setback naturally. Mercury will recommend having the cav plate apx 2 1/2"-3" up from the pad for most Bravo setups. This can vary by amount of setback. More setback, higher engine height. Do not run more prop than you should be, and think you can get away with it by raising engine. You can get the rpm's right this way, but takeoff and handling will be poor, and prop slip will be massive. I would think the 22 you have should be close, or possibly a 22.5". The 22.5" will have a touch more cupping than the 22".

Last edited by muskyed; 04-12-2021 at 08:29 PM.
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  #5  
Old 04-13-2021, 08:14 AM
Waxy Waxy is offline
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Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Calgary AB Canada
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There's a lot of benefits to the hydraulic jackplate. It let's you run a "perfect" setup for any prop, in all conditions and at all speeds, from low speed/rough water, to WOT. Without a jackplate, you're limited to a single compromise.

They are well worth the investment if you're looking to maximize the performance of your boat and add a lot of convenience around the launch, and even getting into your garage.

I'm running the PowrTran Extreme Max, and I am VERY happy with it. It's driven by a 24V electric actuator rather than hydraulics, and it's rated for a 400HP outboard, so no worries about strength or durability. I chose 4" setback because I wanted keep it as short as possible to minimize the leverage on the transom and keep the front to back weight distribution as close to stock as possible. The 350 Verado is a lot of weight and a lot of power hanging off the back.

Waxy
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  #6  
Old 04-16-2021, 12:33 PM
Dixiedawg Dixiedawg is offline
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Join Date: Apr 2020
Posts: 39
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I don't have a Ranger 621, but my 2080 Angler that I purchased last summer came with an Atlas hydraulic setback plate installed. I would not have ordered a boat with a setback plate but now that I have one I would not own a boat without one. I agree with all the previous pros mentioned in this thread.
I have measured the distance from the transom to the setback plate and it is about 9 1/2". The plate is attached to a 6" spacer, and there is another 4" spacer between it and the transom. Since it came with the boat I cannot address the rationale for that far of a setback and whether the boats position on the trailer was changed to compensate for it.
When trailering Atlas recommends lowering the plate to the stops to take pressure off of the seals while on the road. However, when lowered it is possible for the skeg to contact the ground when coming over the crown at boat ramps. Once the outboard is on the transom saver no problem. So it adds one more thing for me to remember to do once the boat is on the trailer. To date I have not noticed any trailer sway when on the road. With two people in the boat and 1/2 tank of gas the gps has shown 57.7, but feel it will do 1-2 mph faster with a little tweaking. Cheers, Dixiedawg
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2019 Ranger FS 621
350 HP Verado
15 HP Mercury Pro Kicker
Troll Master Pro 3+
Tailfin Kicker Remote Steering
9" Garmin Echomap plus 94SV w/Panoptix
HB Helix 12 MSI/MDI gen 3
HB Helix 10 MSI/MDI gen 4
HB Helix 7 MSI/MDI gen 3
10" Atlas Hydraulic set-back plate
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  #7  
Old 04-16-2021, 06:32 PM
Kouki7 Kouki7 is offline
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This is my 621 analysis

If I was bored I could test a 23p Bravo LT and a 22.5p Bravo LT

I run the 22.5p Bravo LT most of the time.
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Last edited by Kouki7; 04-16-2021 at 06:34 PM.
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