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  #21  
Old 11-30-2020, 02:45 PM
Ricky Spanish's Avatar
Ricky Spanish Ricky Spanish is offline
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#1. Be willing to take and follow advice from those that are in the know about current conditions. Drowning worms two feet under a bobber doesn't work in many conditions.

#2. Bring 1/8, 1/4 and 3/8oz jigs depending on depth, wind speed and your gear's ability to share the "feel" of the jig with your hand.
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  #22  
Old 12-01-2020, 05:12 AM
tv4fish tv4fish is offline
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IMO: THE most important thing to tell them is that they will be fishing in bodies of water that potentially have many "dangers" -- the bottom can go from 40 feet to 1 foot in an instant. On any "maiden" voyage - go slow................
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  #23  
Old 12-01-2020, 05:50 AM
Bigtaproot Bigtaproot is offline
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Default First time

Here is my advice. It is supposed to be a vacation so ignore boards like this, put a 3/8 jig on and a white twister tail enjoy the scenery and time with your friends. And, by the way, money spent on a good rain suit It is well spent. I should know I almost froze to death in July
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  #24  
Old 12-01-2020, 06:02 AM
ogilville ogilville is offline
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There has been lots of good advice in this thread. I have been going on fishing trips to Canada for almost 40 years. There have been many different groups of people from experienced to beginning anglers go on the trips. When the fish are biting and you are catching fish it is fun and easy. Sometimes after a few days and the fishing slows down and the weather is rainy, cold, windy or hot and sunny and you are getting bored or tired you might feel like laying down the pole and doing nothing. You are allowed to do that, heck its your fishing trip. But remember you do have to have a lure in the water to catch fish. Sometimes the bites are few and it isn't going to be you that catches the nice one if you aren't fishing. That's my tip to beginners.

Last edited by ogilville; 12-01-2020 at 06:05 AM.
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  #25  
Old 12-01-2020, 01:37 PM
gordy28 gordy28 is offline
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Really good thread with lots of solid info

It's interesting as there are a few variables in my opinion

Lake Size, Lake Pressure, Lake Type

But without knowing where the angler is going I would say put in the time researching

I am always amazed at the information thats out there - before our Ogoki trip I found a years old thread on a city of Toronto tourism board that had some great info that really helped

So for me use the tools available - google is your friend, so is google earth and youtube

Have a rough game plan for area's, tactics and structure that you want to hit before you even arrive

Cheers
Andrew
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  #26  
Old 12-01-2020, 02:35 PM
Braggart Braggart is offline
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Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: Western Canada
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Default First timer advice

I've been fortunate enough to have visited almost every province and territory in Canada as a younger man, and have fished every one that I did visit. These days I tend to stick to a select few areas/trips, those that I particularly enjoy.

Part of it is age, as being north of 50 one tends to start considering mortality and "time left", and I would rather spend time in areas that have special meaning to me.

Part of it is the fact that after all these years, I have whittled down all those experiences to a select few that fit my own personal criteria, namely:

...entirely DIY (take in all my own equipment, accessible via truck/boat. No planes, no lodges, no guides. My meager boat, my tent, my gear, my schedule).

...as remote as possible (the less people the better, none is best).

...unspoiled beauty (hard to find these days).

...and great fishing (whatever that means...to me...every one of these areas has a different allure).

I often take beginners and newbies to these areas, as I do enjoy the company. We do have a core group of guys that have come and gone over the years, but I still enjoy taking someone (those who have similar interests) who has not experienced fishing in an unspoiled area. Due to the fact that I have frequented these areas often, I know what to expect. Newbies do not...

Every trip I start with the same advice as we start our journey/drive, namely "enjoy every part, from this point forward". Even the gruelling 12+ hour drive will result in memories going forward. Too often we rush thru experiences waiting for the highlites, the "good parts". As a result, we end up missing the parts in between that make for the whole experience.

In addition, during the trip I often make it a point to stop and describe that "particular point" in time, trying to create an image in space that we can relate to later on, usually in the dead of winter, when our minds wander back to the time we spent on the water. Identifying these moments in time makes them real, makes us appreciate them all the more. Rushing thru "the bite", trying to put 100 fish in the boat, trying to get that "first cast" into that weedy bay at times makes us crazy and we risk losing sight of why we are there in the first place. Stopping and enjoying the moment as the mist slowly dissipates from the shoreline, the sunrise as the rays break thru the trees, the calmness of the water in the early morning is at times lost on us in our rush to put fish in the boat.

Long winded, for that I apologize, but the takeaway in all this is...slow down. Slow down and make every point in time count. Enjoy the planning, the drive, the company. We may go on these fishing trips for the "end game", which by all accounts is catching "many" or "big" fish, but the true beauty is in the whole experience.

From start to end, and everything in between. Slow down, enjoy the ride.

B
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  #27  
Old 12-01-2020, 09:42 PM
Da' Walleye Assassun Da' Walleye Assassun is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Braggart View Post
I've been fortunate enough to have visited almost every province and territory in Canada as a younger man, and have fished every one that I did visit. These days I tend to stick to a select few areas/trips, those that I particularly enjoy.

Part of it is age, as being north of 50 one tends to start considering mortality and "time left", and I would rather spend time in areas that have special meaning to me.

Part of it is the fact that after all these years, I have whittled down all those experiences to a select few that fit my own personal criteria, namely:

...entirely DIY (take in all my own equipment, accessible via truck/boat. No planes, no lodges, no guides. My meager boat, my tent, my gear, my schedule).

...as remote as possible (the less people the better, none is best).

...unspoiled beauty (hard to find these days).

...and great fishing (whatever that means...to me...every one of these areas has a different allure).

I often take beginners and newbies to these areas, as I do enjoy the company. We do have a core group of guys that have come and gone over the years, but I still enjoy taking someone (those who have similar interests) who has not experienced fishing in an unspoiled area. Due to the fact that I have frequented these areas often, I know what to expect. Newbies do not...

Every trip I start with the same advice as we start our journey/drive, namely "enjoy every part, from this point forward". Even the gruelling 12+ hour drive will result in memories going forward. Too often we rush thru experiences waiting for the highlites, the "good parts". As a result, we end up missing the parts in between that make for the whole experience.

In addition, during the trip I often make it a point to stop and describe that "particular point" in time, trying to create an image in space that we can relate to later on, usually in the dead of winter, when our minds wander back to the time we spent on the water. Identifying these moments in time makes them real, makes us appreciate them all the more. Rushing thru "the bite", trying to put 100 fish in the boat, trying to get that "first cast" into that weedy bay at times makes us crazy and we risk losing sight of why we are there in the first place. Stopping and enjoying the moment as the mist slowly dissipates from the shoreline, the sunrise as the rays break thru the trees, the calmness of the water in the early morning is at times lost on us in our rush to put fish in the boat.

Long winded, for that I apologize, but the takeaway in all this is...slow down. Slow down and make every point in time count. Enjoy the planning, the drive, the company. We may go on these fishing trips for the "end game", which by all accounts is catching "many" or "big" fish, but the true beauty is in the whole experience.

From start to end, and everything in between. Slow down, enjoy the ride.

B
You are a wise man.
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  #28  
Old 12-03-2020, 09:32 PM
WalleyeTherapy WalleyeTherapy is offline
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Enjoy your time there. Youíll realize how special it is when you fish at home.

If you can fish 30 minutes before sunset in somewhat shallow water (4-10í). Fastest fishing Iíve ever experienced occurs 30 minutes before to 30 after sunset.
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  #29  
Old 12-04-2020, 07:10 AM
gordy28 gordy28 is offline
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Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Mississauga, Ontario
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Braggart View Post
I've been fortunate enough to have visited almost every province and territory in Canada as a younger man, and have fished every one that I did visit. These days I tend to stick to a select few areas/trips, those that I particularly enjoy.

Part of it is age, as being north of 50 one tends to start considering mortality and "time left", and I would rather spend time in areas that have special meaning to me.

Part of it is the fact that after all these years, I have whittled down all those experiences to a select few that fit my own personal criteria, namely:

...entirely DIY (take in all my own equipment, accessible via truck/boat. No planes, no lodges, no guides. My meager boat, my tent, my gear, my schedule).

...as remote as possible (the less people the better, none is best).

...unspoiled beauty (hard to find these days).

...and great fishing (whatever that means...to me...every one of these areas has a different allure).

I often take beginners and newbies to these areas, as I do enjoy the company. We do have a core group of guys that have come and gone over the years, but I still enjoy taking someone (those who have similar interests) who has not experienced fishing in an unspoiled area. Due to the fact that I have frequented these areas often, I know what to expect. Newbies do not...

Every trip I start with the same advice as we start our journey/drive, namely "enjoy every part, from this point forward". Even the gruelling 12+ hour drive will result in memories going forward. Too often we rush thru experiences waiting for the highlites, the "good parts". As a result, we end up missing the parts in between that make for the whole experience.

In addition, during the trip I often make it a point to stop and describe that "particular point" in time, trying to create an image in space that we can relate to later on, usually in the dead of winter, when our minds wander back to the time we spent on the water. Identifying these moments in time makes them real, makes us appreciate them all the more. Rushing thru "the bite", trying to put 100 fish in the boat, trying to get that "first cast" into that weedy bay at times makes us crazy and we risk losing sight of why we are there in the first place. Stopping and enjoying the moment as the mist slowly dissipates from the shoreline, the sunrise as the rays break thru the trees, the calmness of the water in the early morning is at times lost on us in our rush to put fish in the boat.

Long winded, for that I apologize, but the takeaway in all this is...slow down. Slow down and make every point in time count. Enjoy the planning, the drive, the company. We may go on these fishing trips for the "end game", which by all accounts is catching "many" or "big" fish, but the true beauty is in the whole experience.

From start to end, and everything in between. Slow down, enjoy the ride.

B
Sage advice - plan on revisiting this post before the next time I head out into the great outdoors
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  #30  
Old 12-04-2020, 07:42 PM
Yellowfin123 Yellowfin123 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Braggart View Post
I've been fortunate enough to have visited almost every province and territory in Canada as a younger man, and have fished every one that I did visit. These days I tend to stick to a select few areas/trips, those that I particularly enjoy.

Part of it is age, as being north of 50 one tends to start considering mortality and "time left", and I would rather spend time in areas that have special meaning to me.

Part of it is the fact that after all these years, I have whittled down all those experiences to a select few that fit my own personal criteria, namely:

...entirely DIY (take in all my own equipment, accessible via truck/boat. No planes, no lodges, no guides. My meager boat, my tent, my gear, my schedule).

...as remote as possible (the less people the better, none is best).

...unspoiled beauty (hard to find these days).

...and great fishing (whatever that means...to me...every one of these areas has a different allure).

I often take beginners and newbies to these areas, as I do enjoy the company. We do have a core group of guys that have come and gone over the years, but I still enjoy taking someone (those who have similar interests) who has not experienced fishing in an unspoiled area. Due to the fact that I have frequented these areas often, I know what to expect. Newbies do not...

Every trip I start with the same advice as we start our journey/drive, namely "enjoy every part, from this point forward". Even the gruelling 12+ hour drive will result in memories going forward. Too often we rush thru experiences waiting for the highlites, the "good parts". As a result, we end up missing the parts in between that make for the whole experience.

In addition, during the trip I often make it a point to stop and describe that "particular point" in time, trying to create an image in space that we can relate to later on, usually in the dead of winter, when our minds wander back to the time we spent on the water. Identifying these moments in time makes them real, makes us appreciate them all the more. Rushing thru "the bite", trying to put 100 fish in the boat, trying to get that "first cast" into that weedy bay at times makes us crazy and we risk losing sight of why we are there in the first place. Stopping and enjoying the moment as the mist slowly dissipates from the shoreline, the sunrise as the rays break thru the trees, the calmness of the water in the early morning is at times lost on us in our rush to put fish in the boat.

Long winded, for that I apologize, but the takeaway in all this is...slow down. Slow down and make every point in time count. Enjoy the planning, the drive, the company. We may go on these fishing trips for the "end game", which by all accounts is catching "many" or "big" fish, but the true beauty is in the whole experience.

From start to end, and everything in between. Slow down, enjoy the ride.

B
that sums it all up
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