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Old 07-25-2008, 07:13 AM
vetspet.ind vetspet.ind is offline
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Default double bottom boats

what makes the double bottom on lund/aluminacraft boats any better than a single bottom?...i realize it's .2" thick vs .1 but if something pokes thru a .1 thickness, i would guess it would poke thru a .2 in many cases also...so that makes me think there is some other benefit to the double layer on these boats...any input would be appreciated..steve
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  #2  
Old 07-25-2008, 07:42 AM
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teamlund teamlund is offline
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Thicker means heavier. Which will allow you to cut through waves better....just my 2 cents!
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Old 07-25-2008, 08:13 AM
bumps2 bumps2 is offline
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Default My Experience with Alumacraft

I have an Alumacraft TS 185 (hull weight-1600#, length-18'11", beam-96", hull bottom gauge-.200). Like Teamlund said thicker means heavier and and this extra weight, I believe, provides a softer ride on rough water. A buddy of mine had a 18' Lowe deep v (hull weight-1200#, beam-90", hull bottom gauge-.125) and there was absolutely no comparison in ride. In a heavy chop my boat rode much softer than his and he agreed (he now has a Lund). But in all fairness my boat has power pedestals on both the drivers and passengers seats and his did not. Power pedestals help alot. Take a ride in single plated and double plated boats and draw your own comparison. IMHO double plating is better but I may be slightly biased.

b2
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  #4  
Old 07-25-2008, 08:28 AM
VernH
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Maybe layers are stronger for the same thickness, like plywood.

Plus, like in my Alumacraft, I have the 2X hull in only certain areas so the extra weight isn't found throughout the entire boat.
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Old 07-25-2008, 01:06 PM
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T Mac T Mac is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vetspet.ind View Post
what makes the double bottom on lund/aluminacraft boats any better than a single bottom?...i realize it's .2" thick vs .1 but if something pokes thru a .1 thickness, i would guess it would poke thru a .2 in many cases also...so that makes me think there is some other benefit to the double layer on these boats...any input would be appreciated..steve
Obviously it would require hitting a sharper object and hitting it harder to poke through a double plate than through a thinner (single) hull.

So yes, you get the strength..but also...I am told, that two layers allows for more flex than one thick single hull of same total thickness.
Some flex contributes to a better ride, of course.
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Old 07-25-2008, 06:20 PM
Bill Krejca Bill Krejca is offline
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I donno, but my impression of a double thickness was that it was another, less expensive way to increase the rigidity of a boat without the cost of adding additional strakes and bracing. I realize this is probably contrary to conventional thinking, but I'd be really interested in a boat builder's educated slant on this.


Bill Krejca
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Old 07-25-2008, 06:54 PM
fireboat fireboat is offline
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Default Double hull

Alumacraft 2xb hull has 2 plates stamped and rivited together and reinforced with 4 strakes running the length of the bottom. The 2xb hull is seamless, it does not depend on hunderds of tinny rivits to hold the keel, center line, of the together. Lund has a double hull in the front half of the boat only. I don't own either one but I have seen the floor out of both of them and I (my opinion), think the 2xb hull has a lot more meat in it. I think a double hull would take a lot more trailering abuse (rollers),than a single hull. Buy whatever looks the best to you. Good luck.
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Old 07-27-2008, 08:29 AM
vetspet.ind vetspet.ind is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Krejca View Post
I donno, but my impression of a double thickness was that it was another, less expensive way to increase the rigidity of a boat without the cost of adding additional strakes and bracing. I realize this is probably contrary to conventional thinking, but I'd be really interested in a boat builder's educated slant on this.


Bill Krejca
bill, sylvan/smoker craft state the double hulls are not stronger than their hulls which have some sort of reverse hat strakes or bracings....that is what i read and it got me wonder ing where the truth lies...steve
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