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  #21  
Old 11-14-2019, 07:28 AM
Jethro Jethro is offline
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No clue what it costs to install as I got it with the house, but my exposed basement has radiant heat in the sheet rock ceiling that I like better than any other "colder room" solution.

The elements heat the sheet rock of the ceiling, heat radiates away from sheet rock and warms whatever it gets to first.
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  #22  
Old 11-14-2019, 08:05 AM
thump55 thump55 is offline
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I was looking at some of the Panasonic fans...down to like .3 sones which as low as I've seen.

The wife isn't a huge fan of the bath fan look, but it's certainly better than a space heater.

I like the 70-80 CFM range for a fan...I think that's about perfect.
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  #23  
Old 11-14-2019, 02:12 PM
Johnboy Johnboy is offline
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Does the fireplace have outside air supplied to it for combustion air ?
If not it will pull air from the closest or easiest space it can get it. If that is the case a fan won't alleviate the problem.
Fireplaces with no outside air supply will create unbelievable vacuums in buildings.
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  #24  
Old 11-15-2019, 06:10 AM
thump55 thump55 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnboy View Post
Does the fireplace have outside air supplied to it for combustion air ?
If not it will pull air from the closest or easiest space it can get it. If that is the case a fan won't alleviate the problem.
Fireplaces with no outside air supply will create unbelievable vacuums in buildings.
No, there is no outside air supply. Long story short, I do have a crudely fashioned system to pull air from the basement into the stove intake using the old ash dump from the original fireplace.

I still think a fan will definitely help even it out. I was hoping to be able to find a way to wire it without ripping up walls/ceilings, but I don't think that's going to be possible.
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  #25  
Old 11-18-2019, 07:16 PM
Anonymouse Anonymouse is offline
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IMMUTABLE LAWS OF NATURE.

1.) Fans, no matter how well made, eventually die & stop working.

2.) If it is buried in a wall, eventually you WILL be re-opening that wall to service and replace the fan motor.

3.) Wall repairs, no matter your skill level, are never "invisible" or "better than new".
It WILL be noticable if you look for it - and even if you don't, if the lighting happens to shadow it just right.

4.) The larger the fan blade circumference/diameter the more air it will move for a given rpm level & the quieter it will be moving that volume of air.
If you chose a 9" fan, it can run considerably quieter than a 4" or even a 6" fan.
Use ceiling fans as an example.
They rotate very slowly and still move enormous volumes of air with their 18"-36" blades and do it extremely quietly - so quiet all you can hear is the swishing of the fan blades themselves as they pass through the air.
The motor itself is audibly invisible.

5.) The larger the mass of air you move, the less the fan has to run to equalize room temperatures.
This can be both good and bad as the torque from starting a fan causes more bearing wear than running it continuously for a much longer period of time.
This can be offset by running the fan motor at far slower (and quieter) speeds to reduce the rate of air transpiration between rooms.
The surge from starting an electric motor is also more expensive than the amount of juice used to keep it running continuously for greater lengths of time.

6.) Wall openings for venting will also allow for more effective sound transmission between rooms.
Bear that in mind if isolating sound in a room is an issue.

Last edited by Anonymouse; 11-18-2019 at 07:33 PM.
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