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  #11  
Old 06-15-2017, 08:12 AM
Blue Lk unlogged
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My mother was born (1930) & raised in a homestead about 2 miles north of Vermilion Bay up the Red Lk Rd (now Hwy 105)
She remembers German POWs coming by in the back of open trucks on their way to spend the day in town,
The camp was on the shore of Trail Lk,right on hwy 105.
There is nothing left of the camp now.
An interesting note.My Grandfather was a German immigrant & at the outbreak of the war the RCMP came to his farmhouse & confiscated his firearms
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  #12  
Old 06-15-2017, 10:15 AM
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ziemann ziemann is offline
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I see from your blog that you already have info from the Atikokan museum of several sites around the Atikokan area.

I believe the site of what was Eva Lake Resort was a camp used by prisoners during WWII. The resort was built in 1956 by Jim and Arlene Shuey. Our family cabin was built from 1958-1960 on the edge of that site. I have neighbors that could potentially provide more detailed info if needed.
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  #13  
Old 06-15-2017, 10:24 AM
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CMesserschmidt CMesserschmidt is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pjshorthorn View Post
I believe there was a camp in close proximity to Devil's Elbow on the NE section of Lac Seul.

PjShorthorn
This is true, we drive by it to fish every time we go out.
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  #14  
Old 06-15-2017, 03:46 PM
Aspencreek Aspencreek is offline
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My first trip to Onaway lodge on Lac Seul back in about 1992 it was run by a gruff, old guy with a HEAVY german accent, unfortunately I can't remember his name or his wife's, but while there I was told by an old timer who worked at the camp that they were both from Germany who came back after the war and built and opened the camp. I don't know if this is true but made for a great story. I don't think any of the original cabins are still around as Blair and Kathy have done a great job of replacing them when they deteriorated. But it makes for some interesting stories.
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  #15  
Old 06-16-2017, 06:58 AM
canadian citizen 2
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here is some links showing there was POW camps near Wawa and Hawk Junction area logging and rail work

https://www.creativecity.ca/database...h_May_2012.pdf

https://www.sootoday.com/local-news/...-photos-184487

good old maps in the book partially shown in this below link and how POWs put to work on the ACR (algoma central railway) is on page 95 of this book on the google search book preview I did and site allows

https://books.google.ca/books?id=IL4...nction&f=false
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  #16  
Old 06-16-2017, 07:34 AM
BMF60 BMF60 is offline
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Black Bear portage on the winnipeg river was owned by a german POW. Hans was captured in north africa fighting for erwin rommel. Many interesting stories from him and margot being part of the hitler youth. Unfortunetaly the camp is not in use anymore, but still stands on the east shore of roughrock lake. Hans passed away years back in the early 90's, but his wife margot is still alive to my knowledge and still resides in minaki, she is 90 or 91 if i remember correctly. The man knew the lake like the back of his hand and was an excellent fisherman/outdoorsman for all species. He had a rough go after sinking his ski-doo in roughrock lake on his way to camp on the ice. he had to strip down and spend the night on an island drying his clothes in very cold weather. thankfully he was smart enough to carry matches in a dry bag or he would have surely died right there.

Last edited by BMF60; 06-16-2017 at 07:54 AM.
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  #17  
Old 06-16-2017, 07:36 AM
Obabikon Obabikon is offline
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The one in Obabikon Lake (Lake of the Woods) had an officer named Gene Ray (spelling might not be correct)

After the war, the country allowed him to build a small cabin in front of where the camp was. If you hike back there, there's old square ruins of where the little cabins used to be.


As a bit of stories, it was not uncommon for the officers to hand the POW's a rifle to go shoot wild game with. They were all in it together. It wasn't at all what many picture POW camps as. I'm sure you're aware of that, but just a memory from some stories I heard as a kid.
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  #18  
Old 06-16-2017, 08:27 AM
powsincanada powsincanada is offline
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Thanks everyone for the comments and suggestions, much appreciated!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Further North View Post
Not sure if this will work, but try reaching out to the Claus Otto at Harris Bay Camp on Sturgeon Lake.

http://www.harrisbay.com/index.html

I believe his father was a POW that came back after the war and opened the resort.

If this works for you, I'd love to see the final result.
Thanks Further North, I'll try get in touch with them and let you know what I find.


Quote:
Originally Posted by tandm View Post
there was , atleast, one camp northwest of Sioux Lookout, Ontario.They , apparently, worked for the pulp mill near Hudson. Not sure where you should start, but Sioux Lookout should have a historical society.
Thanks tandm, there were actually two camps in north of Hudson, run by the Ontario-Minnesota Pulp & Paper Co.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Live to jig View Post
I know there was a German camp in the area Of Long Lac Ont. They were not concerned with them escaping, there was no where to go!
Thanks Live to jig, my records show about ten camps in the Longlac area alone. And while most weren't too concerned with escaping, it didn't stop some of them from trying. Most camps had at least one individual who disappeared from camp only be return a few days later or be arrested. None were successful escaping from any of the lumber camps however.

Quote:
Originally Posted by pjshorthorn View Post
I believe there was a camp in close proximity to Devil's Elbow on the NE section of Lac Seul.
Quote:
Originally Posted by MACH View Post
This is true, we drive by it to fish every time we go out.
Thanks pjshorthorn and MACH, this looks to be one of the Ontario-Minnesota Pup & Paper Co. camps. Does anyone know the exact location of the site? I haven't been able to find it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Krejca View Post
I have a picture of me, as a youngster, paddling in a dugout canoe which was made by prisoners who were at the Alfred Inlet camp in the south part of Whitefish Bay. We found the canoe, which had apparently drifted in and been covered by sand and reemerged on a beach nearby. This was around 1950. The place where the camp stood is now mostly covered over with brush and poison ivy. Prisoners were allowed fishing and paddling privileges after their daily pulp cutting quota was reached. They were allowed to go as far south as Turtle Portage, but were warned they would be shot if they went farther.
Thanks Bill! Any chance you have a digital copy of the photo, I'd love to see it! Boating was a really popular activity for PoWs in their off hours.

Quote:
Originally Posted by castnblast View Post
Neys on the north shore of superior was a significant camp. My grandfather was part of the work crew that was contracted to take down the camp in the 50's
Thanks castnblast. Camp 100 at Neys was probably one of the most scenic locations for an internment camp in the country, being located right on the shoreline of Lake Superior. I stop in every time I drive through Northern Ontario as it is now a provincial park. Not much is left but the visitor's centre has some artifacts and a model on display and you can still make out where many of the buildings were.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SmallyNut View Post
I am fairly certain that there were island camps on the Winnipeg River North of Kenora, at least that is what one of my German neighbors had told me. There has been a lot of German property owners on that system, in and around Minaki.
I don't have any record of any camps north of Kenora, just the ones south. Do you happen to know anything else about them?

Quote:
Originally Posted by LOW1 View Post
Be sure to contact the Lake of the Woods museum in Kenora for information on the Lake of the Woods camp(s). They have a huge photo collection and I bet they have information for you. The archives of Manitoba in Winnipeg and the Ontario archives may also have information.

It would be interesting to track down any surviving prisoners in Germany and get their story.

And I bet the National Archives and/or the Department of Defense have information about historical POW camps.

Good luck on your interesting project.
Thanks LOW1. I've conducted research at all of the institutions you've mentioned. Most of my records come from Department of Defence records at Library and Archives and the LOW museum helped provide some more local information and stories about the Kenora camps. I've been in touch with some former PoWs and their families but the language and distance gap makes finding more quite difficult.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Blue Lk unlogged View Post
My mother was born (1930) & raised in a homestead about 2 miles north of Vermilion Bay up the Red Lk Rd (now Hwy 105)
She remembers German POWs coming by in the back of open trucks on their way to spend the day in town,
The camp was on the shore of Trail Lk,right on hwy 105.
There is nothing left of the camp now.
An interesting note.My Grandfather was a German immigrant & at the outbreak of the war the RCMP came to his farmhouse & confiscated his firearms
Thansk Blue Lk, I'll see if I can find out more about this one. I believe it may be one of the Ontario-Minnesota Pulp & Paper Co. camps based out of Vermilion Bay. Do you happen to know where on the lake the camp was?

Quote:
Originally Posted by ziemann View Post
I see from your blog that you already have info from the Atikokan museum of several sites around the Atikokan area.

I believe the site of what was Eva Lake Resort was a camp used by prisoners during WWII. The resort was built in 1956 by Jim and Arlene Shuey. Our family cabin was built from 1958-1960 on the edge of that site. I have neighbors that could potentially provide more detailed info if needed.
Thanks ziemann, yes, I've been in touch with the Atikokan museum and they were able to provide some photos. I would definitely be interested to hear if your neighbors have any more information as I don't have the exact locations of most of the camps in the Flanders/Atikokan area.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Aspencreek View Post
My first trip to Onaway lodge on Lac Seul back in about 1992 it was run by a gruff, old guy with a HEAVY german accent, unfortunately I can't remember his name or his wife's, but while there I was told by an old timer who worked at the camp that they were both from Germany who came back after the war and built and opened the camp. I don't know if this is true but made for a great story. I don't think any of the original cabins are still around as Blair and Kathy have done a great job of replacing them when they deteriorated. But it makes for some interesting stories.
Interesting, I'll have to see what I can find. Quite a few PoWs came back to Canada to settle after the war, having enjoyed their experience here. Really makes for some interesting stories as PoWs are not often fond of their internment experience.

Quote:
Originally Posted by canadian citizen 2 View Post
here is some links showing there was POW camps near Wawa and Hawk Junction area logging and rail work

https://www.creativecity.ca/database...h_May_2012.pdf

https://www.sootoday.com/local-news/...-photos-184487

good old maps in the book partially shown in this below link and how POWs put to work on the ACR (algoma central railway) is on page 95 of this book on the google search book preview I did and site allows

https://books.google.ca/books?id=IL4...nction&f=false
Thanks, I'll take a look at these!

Quote:
Originally Posted by BMF60 View Post
Black Bear portage on the winnipeg river was owned by a german POW. Hans was captured in north africa fighting for erwin rommel. Many interesting stories from him and margot being part of the hitler youth. Unfortunetaly the camp is not in use anymore, but still stands on the east shore of roughrock lake. Hans passed away years back in the early 90's, but his wife margot is still alive to my knowledge and still resides in minaki, she is 90 or 91 if i remember correctly. The man knew the lake like the back of his hand and was an excellent fisherman/outdoorsman for all species. He had a rough go after sinking his ski-doo in roughrock lake on his way to camp on the ice. he had to strip down and spend the night on an island drying his clothes in very cold weather. thankfully he was smart enough to carry matches in a dry bag or he would have surely died right there.
Thanks BMF60 - I believe I know who you are talking about as I've found a few mentions of him. I did not realize his wife was still alive, I will see if I can get in touch with her.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Obabikon View Post
The one in Obabikon Lake (Lake of the Woods) had an officer named Gene Ray (spelling might not be correct)

After the war, the country allowed him to build a small cabin in front of where the camp was. If you hike back there, there's old square ruins of where the little cabins used to be.

As a bit of stories, it was not uncommon for the officers to hand the POW's a rifle to go shoot wild game with. They were all in it together. It wasn't at all what many picture POW camps as. I'm sure you're aware of that, but just a memory from some stories I heard as a kid.
Thanks Obabikon, I'll have to look into this. I've heard quite a few stories of guards or civilian employees handing PoWs a rifle to go hunting with. The relationships between PoWs and their guards is really interesting as the guards were old enough to be their fathers and many of the guards had sons serving overseas on active service.
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  #19  
Old 06-16-2017, 09:29 AM
LOW1 LOW1 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by powsincanada View Post


. . .Thanks pjshorthorn and MACH, this looks to be one of the Ontario-Minnesota Pup & Paper Co. camps. . . .


.
Fascinating. So private companies were in the POW prison camp business? Can you get access to the business records of these companies? Was it profitable to have POW labor? Who paid for things like guards, food. etc for the prisoners? Were the POWs even paid?

Was the Hudson Bay Company involved? If so, they probably kept records of everything they did and they may be in the Manitoba archives.

Best wishes.
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  #20  
Old 06-16-2017, 01:19 PM
gullrockguy gullrockguy is offline
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my buddy in thunder bay has bought the old stationmasters house at the Mack rail siding, north of Upsala, and they leased the land at the old pow site on a lake about a mile from there, not sure what lake it is on but i've fished it and it is full of pike and the water is absolutely crystal clear.
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