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  #21  
Old 10-15-2021, 12:20 PM
Anonymouse Anonymouse is offline
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Anonymouse uses a 24# navy-style anchor (rounded flukes, not the sharp sand-point type) that has a ring that can slide up and down the U-shackle when you reverse position, to facilitate pulling the anchor out from under anything it's flukes might have dragged & wedged under when the current pulled on the boat and rope.
The ring will slide down next to the flukes - in effect reversing where the force is applied when you pull up the rope - & backing the flukes out against the current without applying leverage to the flukes through the U-shackle.
Believe the anchor originally came from Farm & Barn here in Madison, as did the chain and rope - but nobody apparently sells that particular rope around here anymore.
Probably because it's so tough it never needs replacing.
It's also getting hard to find navy-style anchors with that particular u-shackle with the sliding ring.
Most are now a solid bar-style shackle and have no sliding ring.

The 100' rope is 1/2" orange/black nylon double-braid with a tensile strength of around 7,300# and a working load rating of 1,460#.
It has held up extremely well since 1995, when it got converted from a tree puller to an anchor rope.
The rope is attached to the anchor with a pair of galvanized U-clevis fasteners using a short 3' section (6' doubled) of yellow poly-covered steel chain as the intermediary to prevent chaffing on the business end of the rope.

Yeah, it's a bit heavy but Anonymouse is anchoring a 22' cuddy that weighs in at 4,000# in depths of up to 55' to get a decent rode angle with the remaining 45' and set the anchor solidly into gravel or muck.
If you don't have enough rode, the wave action's vertical component will unseat almost any anchor, regardless of it's weight.
30 degrees to 45 degrees is ideal - the shallower the angle the better.
It works supremely well (sometimes TOO well when winds get up over 20mph and the waves bucking on the rode are 3' or better) here in Madison where the maximum depth in the 3 lakes is no more than 83' (which nobody fishes that deep anyway).

In Lake Erie you're going to need 200' of rope to get a decent rode angle in the central and eastern basins, since much of it is over 60'-65' in depth and mostly sand or muck bottom (which is tougher to get a solid hookup in).
The more vertical the rode angle is, the more likely you are to drift off your spot while the flukes try to find a purchase in the bottom material.
Lake Huron's south bay is mostly over 100', so we assume you aren't anchoring out there any time soon in yer little puddle-jumper.

But, in Lake St. Clair the maximum depth is allegedly only 21' (27' in the navigation channel), so 100' of rope will do you nicely.
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Last edited by Anonymouse; 10-15-2021 at 12:48 PM.
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  #22  
Old 10-16-2021, 06:12 AM
last chance's Avatar
last chance last chance is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vtec View Post
I found this one through another thread here some years ago, I like it, really holds well.
https://www.amazon.com/Marinetech-55.../dp/B001B985P6
that's a great anchor but it says a 10# anchor for up to a 22' boat. if I was perch fishing Erie I would opt for a 15# if not heavier. use about a 6' or 8' 3/8"chain on the anchor. I like having enough rope to hold in water as deep as 50'. so I have 300' of 5/16 spooled up on an electric extension cord reel from lowes. but 150' should be plenty for perch fishing. and 150' of 3/8 nylon rope should fit that extension cord reel. it's just a nice way to store your rope.
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  #23  
Old 10-16-2021, 06:45 AM
Rick! Rick! is online now
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I had this in my 18 1/2' Lund for many years.


https://www.diggeranchor.com/summer-line
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  #24  
Old 10-16-2021, 09:28 AM
gbin gbin is offline
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Location: upstate NY (but MN in my heart!)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Anonymouse View Post
Anonymouse uses a 24# navy-style anchor (rounded flukes, not the sharp sand-point type) that has a ring that can slide up and down the U-shackle when you reverse position, to facilitate pulling the anchor out from under anything it's flukes might have dragged & wedged under when the current pulled on the boat and rope.
The ring will slide down next to the flukes - in effect reversing where the force is applied when you pull up the rope - & backing the flukes out against the current without applying leverage to the flukes through the U-shackle.
Believe the anchor originally came from Farm & Barn here in Madison, as did the chain and rope - but nobody apparently sells that particular rope around here anymore.
Probably because it's so tough it never needs replacing.
It's also getting hard to find navy-style anchors with that particular u-shackle with the sliding ring.
Most are now a solid bar-style shackle and have no sliding ring.

The 100' rope is 1/2" orange/black nylon double-braid with a tensile strength of around 7,300# and a working load rating of 1,460#.
It has held up extremely well since 1995, when it got converted from a tree puller to an anchor rope.
The rope is attached to the anchor with a pair of galvanized U-clevis fasteners using a short 3' section (6' doubled) of yellow poly-covered steel chain as the intermediary to prevent chaffing on the business end of the rope.

Yeah, it's a bit heavy but Anonymouse is anchoring a 22' cuddy that weighs in at 4,000# in depths of up to 55' to get a decent rode angle with the remaining 45' and set the anchor solidly into gravel or muck.
If you don't have enough rode, the wave action's vertical component will unseat almost any anchor, regardless of it's weight.
30 degrees to 45 degrees is ideal - the shallower the angle the better.
It works supremely well (sometimes TOO well when winds get up over 20mph and the waves bucking on the rode are 3' or better) here in Madison where the maximum depth in the 3 lakes is no more than 83' (which nobody fishes that deep anyway).

In Lake Erie you're going to need 200' of rope to get a decent rode angle in the central and eastern basins, since much of it is over 60'-65' in depth and mostly sand or muck bottom (which is tougher to get a solid hookup in).
The more vertical the rode angle is, the more likely you are to drift off your spot while the flukes try to find a purchase in the bottom material.
Lake Huron's south bay is mostly over 100', so we assume you aren't anchoring out there any time soon in yer little puddle-jumper.

But, in Lake St. Clair the maximum depth is allegedly only 21' (27' in the navigation channel), so 100' of rope will do you nicely.
I have an 18 lb Richter, a rigid, "aggressive" fluke anchor, because I wanted something that would handle whatever water I chose to fish, big or small, rocky, sandy or muddy, calm, windy or flowing. It has that side bar and ring system that makes the anchor easy to free when it's time to raise it, too. Makes a big difference.

Doesn't really sound necessary for the specific body of water the OP fishes, though.

Gerry
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  #25  
Old 10-16-2021, 12:01 PM
Donscs Donscs is offline
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Join Date: Jul 2017
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Default Just A Follow Up To My Earlier Response

Just a follow up on a previous post I made regarding your post. I had a 20 foot fiberglass dual console Proline and I used a Fortress FX7 with some chain on Lake St. Clair and never had a problem holding bottom even in rough water. The bottom of Lake St. Clair is pretty much mud, weeds, and in places sand. The last thing I want to do is pull up a 15 pound anchor covered with weeds, the FX7 weighs all of 4 pounds not counting the chain.

I currently have a 23 Ĺ Mako Walk Around with a hard top and went up to the Fortress FX11 and have never had a problem with it holding in Lake St. Clair. A few years ago I took the Mako to Canada and pulled out of Port Burwell to fish Long Point. We were fishing in 50 feet of water and didnít have any trouble holding bottom, just need to make sure and let out enough anchor rope. There were days we couldnít run up to Long Point because of the south winds so we fished close to the Port in 3 to 4 foot rollers and still didnít have any trouble holding bottom.
One of the features of the Fortress is you can change the angle of the flukes to 32 or 45 degrees, the part of the anchor that digs into the bottom. With it set at 45 degrees it takes 2 men and a mule to bust it loose so I have it set at 32 degrees.

Given its performance and weight I wouldnít own a different kind of anchor for Lake St. Clair. Oh and I donít have to worry about some knuckle head dropping a heavy anchor on the deck.

JMHO,
Donscs
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  #26  
Old 10-16-2021, 01:06 PM
gbin gbin is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Donscs View Post
Just a follow up on a previous post I made regarding your post. I had a 20 foot fiberglass dual console Proline and I used a Fortress FX7 with some chain on Lake St. Clair and never had a problem holding bottom even in rough water. The bottom of Lake St. Clair is pretty much mud, weeds, and in places sand. The last thing I want to do is pull up a 15 pound anchor covered with weeds, the FX7 weighs all of 4 pounds not counting the chain.

I currently have a 23 Ĺ Mako Walk Around with a hard top and went up to the Fortress FX11 and have never had a problem with it holding in Lake St. Clair. A few years ago I took the Mako to Canada and pulled out of Port Burwell to fish Long Point. We were fishing in 50 feet of water and didnít have any trouble holding bottom, just need to make sure and let out enough anchor rope. There were days we couldnít run up to Long Point because of the south winds so we fished close to the Port in 3 to 4 foot rollers and still didnít have any trouble holding bottom.
One of the features of the Fortress is you can change the angle of the flukes to 32 or 45 degrees, the part of the anchor that digs into the bottom. With it set at 45 degrees it takes 2 men and a mule to bust it loose so I have it set at 32 degrees.

Given its performance and weight I wouldnít own a different kind of anchor for Lake St. Clair. Oh and I donít have to worry about some knuckle head dropping a heavy anchor on the deck.

JMHO,
Donscs
Sounds like solid advice! Well, except for that part about taking a mule aboard... I HAVE been impressed by how much easier that side-bar-and-ring setup makes it to free an anchor, though.

Gerry
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  #27  
Old 10-16-2021, 04:12 PM
REW REW is offline
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Here is a nice Anchor guide from Fortress anchors:

https://fortressanchors.com/resource...choring-guide/
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  #28  
Old 10-17-2021, 04:32 AM
last chance's Avatar
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I love the sliding ring on my anchor. it makes it so much easier to retrieve the anchor. just bull the boat to the upside of the anchor and the ring slides to the back of the anchor. then it's usually just a matter of pulling the rope to free the anchor. if it ever sticks on you just use the boat to free it. I've been using the fluke style anchor for at least 20 some years and I pull the boat to the upside of the anchor until the rope gets tight and frees the anchor. then all I have to do is bring it in.

depending on the length and size of your rope you might want to use the electric extension cord reel for storing your rope. I have 300' of 5/16 on one. I'm sure it would hole 150' of 3/8.

oh, and when pulling the anchor I get the anchor rope and put it on a rear cleat so I'm pulling the rope with the back of the boat. for just pulling to the upside and pulling it by hand there is no need to tie it off on the rear cleat.
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  #29  
Old 10-17-2021, 10:04 AM
DW DW is online now
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I use spot lock so anchoring is not a regular chore. Anchors are an essential safety item and should be carried on board. Also, anchors may be essential if the electric motor runs out of juice or dysfunctions and you want to continue to fish without drifting or trolling

I still use a hydrobubble which is no longer readily available. It is designed so that the shank is easily disconnected so the anchor is easily stowed in two pieces.

I still own danforth and delta anchors which I rarely use, but sometimes take when using an anchor when beaching on shore so that the boat is anchored on one end in the water, and is set by an anchor on shore so the boat doesnít swing and holds perpendicular when beached or along shore. Not bad but there better options for each style.

I have read all the anchor tests and conclude a spade style is the best choice for a range of bottom conditions.

Chain decreases the length of rode required. More chain allows less rode. A long rode is bad if you fish on a small underwater feature because of the big swing.

Unless your into lifting heavy anchors, the tests show navy anchors are the worst at holding. That is consistent with my experience and I got rid of mine. An engine block is probably a better choice.
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  #30  
Old 10-18-2021, 02:07 AM
REW REW is offline
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DW,
Actually there are quite a few boats that use engine blocks for holding rock solid steady over a small point. They keep it on the front deck and have a winch and swing arm to raise and lower the block as needed for a robust solid anchor point when wanting to keep all of their clients exactly on fish.

Best wishes
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