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  #1  
Old 12-02-2021, 06:04 PM
mhouge mhouge is offline
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Default Charging multiple batteries over winter

Guys,

I have 4 12v deep cycle batteries (two for trolling, one for engine/electronics, and one on the trailer for an electric winch).

I have a fairly nice Schumacher charger (it does 2/10/50 amp via switch and also does normal or deep cycle via switch).

Has anyone hooked up their batteries in parallel (while being stored) and used a single charger to maintain all four at once?

I was thinking I could do this with my Schumacher charger set at 2 amps and the deep cycle switch setting. Then I wouldn't have rotate the charger to a different battery every two weeks or so. All four batteries would then be trickle-charged at once.

Thoughts?
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  #2  
Old 12-02-2021, 09:34 PM
Dave G Dave G is offline
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Should any cell in the 4 batteries go bad while charging them in parallel it could discharge all your batteries. I would not do it.
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  #3  
Old 12-02-2021, 10:13 PM
h8go4s h8go4s is online now
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If you're talking about long-term storage over the winter, there's no need to put good batteries on a charger over the winter. Batteries operate by chemical reaction. Chemical reactions slow down as temperatures decrease. They will not discharge significantly over the winter if they are good batteries, water is topped off, fully charged before storage, and then all the leads disconnected. (Also, disconnecting all the leads from the batteries gives you the incentive to clean them next spring before you reconnect.) Many of us, including me, store our boats in commercial areas where there is no power available to run a charger, with no ill effects. I live in central Minnesota, where winter temps commonly reach -20F and have never had any battery damage. Attached is 7 years' worth of voltage readings before and after storage on my boat.
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  #4  
Old 12-03-2021, 02:33 AM
RottenRalph RottenRalph is offline
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I take all batteries out of the boat, lawn mower, golf cart, etc & put them on the counter in the heated garage. Clean them up, top the water off and charge initially. Then I will check them each month with a tester and if they need to be charged I’ll put a small trickle charger on them. Usually never have to all winter. Won’t hurt to leave them out in the cold unless they go dead and then they could freeze.
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  #5  
Old 12-03-2021, 05:10 AM
same here
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Default same here

^^^^I do the same. Have them on lower shelf in garage with all terminals the same direction cuz hard to see then I don't even have to slide them forward to determine + or -. Throw a charger on each one throughout a Saturday every month or so and good to go. Easy.
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  #6  
Old 12-03-2021, 06:32 AM
Bill Krejca Bill Krejca is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by h8go4s View Post
If you're talking about long-term storage over the winter, there's no need to put good batteries on a charger over the winter. Batteries operate by chemical reaction. Chemical reactions slow down as temperatures decrease. They will not discharge significantly over the winter if they are good batteries, water is topped off, fully charged before storage, and then all the leads disconnected. (Also, disconnecting all the leads from the batteries gives you the incentive to clean them next spring before you reconnect.) Many of us, including me, store our boats in commercial areas where there is no power available to run a charger, with no ill effects. I live in central Minnesota, where winter temps commonly reach -20F and have never had any battery damage. Attached is 7 years' worth of voltage readings before and after storage on my boat.
What he said.

Bill
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  #7  
Old 12-03-2021, 06:54 AM
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KPKyllo KPKyllo is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by h8go4s View Post
If you're talking about long-term storage over the winter, there's no need to put good batteries on a charger over the winter. Batteries operate by chemical reaction. Chemical reactions slow down as temperatures decrease. They will not discharge significantly over the winter if they are good batteries, water is topped off, fully charged before storage, and then all the leads disconnected. (Also, disconnecting all the leads from the batteries gives you the incentive to clean them next spring before you reconnect.) Many of us, including me, store our boats in commercial areas where there is no power available to run a charger, with no ill effects. I live in central Minnesota, where winter temps commonly reach -20F and have never had any battery damage. Attached is 7 years' worth of voltage readings before and after storage on my boat.
I totally agree with h8go4s. I live in northern MN, store my boat in my unheated quonset and leave my batteries in my boat with at least one cable removed from each (to make sure there is no chance of current drain) with all cells topped off and fully charged. I've never had a problem and never expect to have a problem. If a battery is bad in the spring, the battery was bad to start with anyway and needed replacing. I load test my batteries every spring also and my last set of batteries on my trolling motor lasted 6 years and my starting battery lasted 8 years.
Like h8go4s says, in the cold the chemical reactions that take place in a lead acid battery take place much more slowly than at room temperature.
The only way batteries will freeze is if they are discharged and if they discharge they are bad anyway. I know by reading on the internet that some companies claim a trickle charge is needed over the winter but I've been trained in chemistry and electronics and don't believe that to be true unless a battery is bad to start with.
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  #8  
Old 12-03-2021, 09:23 AM
NM_Trout NM_Trout is offline
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Mine stay in my boat, on the tender 24/7/365. Only time off of a tender is when they are in use. I'm too busy & forgetful to put them on a shelf and check and charge on a schedule. Leaving these batteries on a very good tending system has provided a long life and they still have near-new capacity.

If you can afford a good battery tender for each one, do it. If not, be disciplined and give them a periodic check and charge.

I agree that placing them in parallel and battery tending them all together is risky.
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  #9  
Old 12-03-2021, 10:59 AM
tewwbulltom tewwbulltom is offline
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Location: st.paul, mn, usa.
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Default Battery storage.

I have winterizing issues since the early 70's. Good post from many. After a battery is a few years old for whatever reason could be bad. I take all my batteries, charge them up, disconnect on a full charge checked the day after full charge . A "good" battery should be close to full charge come April . If any test lower than it should I would expect that sometime during the summer it will fail. I have 7 boat, two atv and two lawmower batteries
Your only decision is looking at a battery that has issues and gambling
On when it is going to fail. Your choice!
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  #10  
Old 12-03-2021, 12:08 PM
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TomP. TomP. is offline
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If I went by what some do here removing batteries etc with all my farm equipment with batteries in them it would be a major endeavor.

As mentioned above if the battery is good there is no problem with them sitting over winter in the cold, if it wasn`t I would have one **** of a mess every spring..
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