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  #11  
Old 06-18-2019, 07:16 AM
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big popi big popi is offline
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I have a Shorelander galvanized dual axle under my Impact and I really like it. I happen to prefer the galvanized and with a little cold glav paint you can touch it up. I have more trailer than what I need for around town, but I like the extra capacity when we travel with the boat.
I did look at an aluminum trailer and if I was going to use in salt water, I would have went with the AL.
My son has a 2000 Lund Alaskan with single axle galvanized trailer and it still looks great.
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  #12  
Old 06-20-2019, 12:38 PM
SLE SLE is online now
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Line-X, Tough Coat, and the other armor coated products are great for holding up to rock chips and gravel roads, they will still have rust and bleed through at joints and I have seen it peel so it's not perfect either. My last trailer under my 2013 Yar-craft was a coated trailer and when I sold it last year there were a couple spots that were just starting to show signs of peeling around the winch post and had a little surface rust around some of the bolt holes. The trailer didn't have alot of miles as it really only went from our lake place to the dock but did have a lot of trips in and out of the water. The other downside is they will fade a bit in the sun and it's hard to keep them looking nice. it;s like the dirt and dust gets into the crevas's and you cann't hardly get it scrubbed out. they kind of always look dirty other than the first year when they are new.

Galvanized holds up well, it'll be st slightly uglier in 20 years than the day you buy it. They don't chip and I bet most will outlast the boats that sit on them. a little more dull as time goes on is probably the only real downside.

Obviously you know how the steel painted trailers hold up. If you don't run up and down a bunch of gravel and have some protection with some rock tamers or similar, they probably do every bit as good as the tough coated trailers. They do wipe down nicer and are easier to keep clean but probably the least durable to chips and mother nature. The other downside is climbing ont he trailer with gravel on your shoes will scratch and scuff it over time.

I think the best option is a nice aluminum trailer. Time will tell, the new Yar-Craft is sitting on a custom EZ-Loader Aluminum with disc brakes, stainless hardware, aluminum rims, torsion axles, LED lights, and oil bath vault hubs. Not much to corrode in the way of rust anyway. I know the aluminum will also dull with time but you can get products to clean, brighten and polish them if you have the desire to do so. Probably the best option but also the most expensive.

I can say my current aluminum is a better built trailer than the last steel coated trailer. The steel coated trailer rear cross member would flex with the transom savor, not so much on the aluminum. The new aluminum also pulls better. Both trailers were from the same company, so not sure if they simply treat the aluminum as a premium product, or if they've improved their manufacturing across the board over the past 6 years, but in either regard the new trailer is better than the old one, material choice aside.
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  #13  
Old 06-21-2019, 05:55 AM
btyreprich btyreprich is offline
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Thanks for the last post. Sounds like you checked things out before buying the aluminum trailer.
How much more is an aluminum trailer versus a galvanized trailer with the same features?
10% more? 20 % more?
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  #14  
Old 06-21-2019, 07:32 AM
SLE SLE is online now
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Can't help you on that one. I think with Yar-Craft, it's around a $2,500 upgrade over the tuff coated steel trailer with the same features. I know when they first came out with the aluminum frame option a couple of years ago, the upgrade cost was only like $750, it was a no brainer. I've been told the cost went up substantially last year when all the steel/aluminum tariffs hit. I think the Aluminum trailer under my current 2018 was around $6,000+- and that was before the tariffs pushed prices up so probably close to $7,500 now. Keep in mind this is for a 21' boat and has most of the options boxes checked.
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  #15  
Old 06-22-2019, 11:09 AM
MarkG MarkG is offline
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I think there is some amount of overthinking going on. Aluminum might be the answer if dunking in saltwater. But of no real value,not worth the excess expense otherwise. They are popular for snowmobile trailers here, but they are towing on salted roads.

Another vote for a 4 bunk Trailmaster custom,C-channel frame, Dexter hubs, in any finish that makes you comfortable and in your budget...Painted, Trailgard, or Galvanized, I have owned 3 painted C-channel Trailmasters over the last nearly 30 years. My current one, have had for 18 years. Their painted finish is VERY durable. Mine still looks great. With only minor chips and they actually did not rust. I cannot explain why, maybe the primer. Have traveled a lot with it,,,south to Tennessee, North to northern Minnesota, many places in between, including those pesky gravel roads to those out of way resorts.

If I were in the market for a new rig, would for sure skip any Shorelanders (been there, done that.) No question it would be another 4 bunk Trailmaster. Probably even just another painted one. Had no issues with their finish... or their bearings. Forget the oil filled.. ( If the oil leaks out you are stranded). Go Dexter system ...Flush the hubs with fresh grease once a year. Only time you will ever need to disassemble is if and when the inner seals start to sling grease. indicating time to replace them. Will be years before that happens.

Important to size the trailer correctly with the right GVWR rating for your rig when fully loaded with gear and gas, that will give you capacity to spare. Do not max it out. Go with a 4 bunk, will load like a dream ,straight every time. And just like your car...Keep it CLEAN. In any finish, will last a long long time.

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  #16  
Old 06-22-2019, 12:46 PM
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Bobby Winds Bobby Winds is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MarkG View Post
I think there is some amount of overthinking going on. Aluminum might be the answer if dunking in saltwater. But of no real value,not worth the excess expense otherwise. They are popular for snowmobile trailers here, but they are towing on salted roads.

Another vote for a 4 bunk Trailmaster custom,C-channel frame, Dexter hubs, in any finish that makes you comfortable and in your budget...Painted, Trailgard, or Galvanized, I have owned 3 painted C-channel Trailmasters over the last nearly 30 years. My current one, have had for 18 years. Their painted finish is VERY durable. Mine still looks great. With only minor chips and they actually did not rust. I cannot explain why, maybe the primer. Have traveled a lot with it,,,south to Tennessee, North to northern Minnesota, many places in between, including those pesky gravel roads to those out of way resorts.

If I were in the market for a new rig, would for sure skip any Shorelanders (been there, done that.) No question it would be another 4 bunk Trailmaster. Probably even just another painted one. Had no issues with their finish... or their bearings. Forget the oil filled.. ( If the oil leaks out you are stranded). Go Dexter system ...Flush the hubs with fresh grease once a year. Only time you will ever need to disassemble is if and when the inner seals start to sling grease. indicating time to replace them. Will be years before that happens.

Important to size the trailer correctly with the right GVWR rating for your rig when fully loaded with gear and gas, that will give you capacity to spare. Do not max it out. Go with a 4 bunk, will load like a dream ,straight every time. And just like your car...Keep it CLEAN. In any finish, will last a long long time.

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I agree but I prefer the Trailmaster Premium tube trailer over the standard C channel trailer. It’s a stronger trailer with much larger stepping area to climb in and out of the boat. And with it being Tundra coated the fender is not slippery like a painted would be. My old trailer I wore off the paint on top of the fenders from climbing in and out. Not gonna happen with the Tundra coating. Plus it tows like a dream up to 75 mph.
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  #17  
Old 06-22-2019, 02:22 PM
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If the trailer is fabricated properly for hot dip galvanizing and dipped properly you shouldn’t see any rust ever. At least not as long as you and your grand children are alive. Now you might see some rust from the pin holes on welds if welded poorly but if vented properly there should never be any rust.
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  #18  
Old 07-12-2019, 06:03 PM
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When I purchased my Crestliner it has a Shorelander painted trailer under it first thing I did was wiped down the trailer with lacquer thinner and sprayed it with clear chip guard. After 19 years of use have very little rust showing mostly around where the bolts go thru the trailer.
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