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  #1  
Old 06-16-2019, 06:14 AM
btyreprich btyreprich is offline
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Default Trailers

Starting to plan out my retirement boat and have a question about trailers.
Previous trailer was a Shorerlander - near the end it looked like "heck" as it was a painted model.
Wont do that again! (Painted trailer).
Am thinking that a dual axle trailer with swing tongue in either galvanized steel or perhaps even aluminum is the way to go. Will also have brakes and oil filled hubs.
Am hoping people on this site could provide me with their recommendations as to what brands to look at. Want the trailer to be extra strong and involve a minimum of maintenance. When I do finally retire, I plan on taking lots of fishing trips to catch up on time lost!
I see from Google searches that the aluminum trailers are popular in Florida - not so in the Midwest where I live.
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  #2  
Old 06-16-2019, 12:55 PM
bubba800 bubba800 is offline
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My Eagle never lets me down.

http://www.eagletrailer.com/
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  #3  
Old 06-16-2019, 01:53 PM
REW REW is offline
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BTY,
Go with the galvanized trailer. It will look the same when it is 20 years old as the first day that you have purchased it.

Good luck .
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  #4  
Old 06-16-2019, 03:44 PM
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Clairebear Clairebear is offline
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Galvanized forever, doesn't stay nice and shiny like new, just takes on a duller gray color.
If you drill a hole or any modifications it will rust so treat area properly.
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  #5  
Old 06-16-2019, 05:49 PM
btyreprich btyreprich is offline
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So if I go with a galvanized, seems like rock chips can lead to rust problems.
I understand this.
Are there any exceptionally well made galvanized trailers to consider?
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  #6  
Old 06-16-2019, 11:20 PM
REW REW is offline
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Byte,
To be honest, I have seen some really old galvanized trailers and I have not seen any rock chips on them.

They may chip, but I just have never seen any trailers of this type with any rock chips on them, no matter the age.

Good luck
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  #7  
Old 06-17-2019, 05:08 AM
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fishin10 fishin10 is offline
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Here are a few pictures of the 2000 Karavan galvanized trailer under my 2000 Bayliner a few days before I sold itin 2015. I had a Continental galvanized trailer under my 1995 Sylvan, still looked great when I sold it in 2002. Heres a few popular MFG, down here in the Tampa Fl area. Hands down aluminum or galvanized over painted trailers.

https://www.continentaltrailers.com/
http://www.ezloader.com/
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  #8  
Old 06-17-2019, 06:03 AM
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Bobby Winds Bobby Winds is offline
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Galvanized is ugly but it will outlast any painted trailer.

Another option is a Line-X coating on the trailer that will never chip off.

My Trailmaster trailer built in 2015 has a similar coating to Line-X that they called "Tundra Coating" and I'm very pleased with it but it attracts a LOT of clay/mud from one of my launch sites....I have to hand wash it off. However Trailmaster now calls this coating "Trailgard Protective Coating" as one of their options......

https://trailmastertrailers.com/feat...ions/optional/

https://trailmastertrailers.com/
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  #9  
Old 06-17-2019, 07:59 AM
DW DW is offline
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I regularly go to Florida after retirement. I have a good painted steel trailer I never dunked in seawater. Just one time in salt and it will never be the same. Consequently, I pay to have the boat hauled on/off the trailer. Paid enough for the boat hauling to buy a good aluminum trailer in the first place.

Skip the galvanized and get an aluminum trailer and you will be fine. Get as much stainless attachments and brake components as possible. Iíve seen a lot of rusty galvanized trailers. They donít last forever.

Buy a seawater trolling motor such as the riptide.
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  #10  
Old 06-17-2019, 12:06 PM
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Homegrown1 Homegrown1 is offline
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When I was shopping for my new Lund, my dealer suggested I forgo the standard Shoreland'r trailer and instead specify a Trailmaster "C" channel type trailer. With the channel type, there's no hollow tube to rust from the inside out as with most trailers. As my old 25 year old trailer showed signs of this happening, I opted for the channel type of trailer. You may also want to rethink the oil filled hubs. I'd recommend a Dexter axle with their "E-Z Lube" type hubs. These are the type with a center Zerk grease fitting that is drilled through to the rear seal, and as you add grease, it purges the old grease out of the front. On my old trailer, I pulled the hubs every three or four years and inspected the bearings. When I sold the boat and trailer, the original 25 year old bearings were still going strong.
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