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  #31  
Old 09-25-2018, 06:48 AM
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MikeV MikeV is offline
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We have tile in all the bathrooms and the upstairs mud room/ laundry
The rest of the house is 4 wide red oak planks. About 1900 feet of it. I have had small pipe leak behind the refrigerator caught within a few hours and repaired. Cupped the floor bad. Month later the floor was back to normal. Then a dishwasher leak. Not a pipe leak but a positioning on dishes causing the water to shoot down and hit the float. That happened 3 times. Warped the wood again. Month later all good again. I had enough water to get on top of the subfloor and travel 3 feet to a seem dripping in the basement.

Resist the urge to repair a wood floor right away. It may settle back down with time. About a month.

My parents have tile in the kitchen and have cracked tile from heavy can drops. I have a few small marks from the same thing. Both have advantages and disadvantages
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  #32  
Old 09-25-2018, 10:43 AM
Mr. Sauger Mr. Sauger is offline
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Thumbs up Hardwood

We put in oak hardwood floors two years ago because the kitchen layout flowed from a den. It has been a good decision so far. No noticeable damage despite an occasional spill, dog (with nails and accidents), 13 year old boy, dropped ice cube, etc. It holds up just fine - no wear spots or uneven areas. Warm in bare feet. Have not yet been tested with broken pipes, flooding, volcanoes, cyclones, etc.
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  #33  
Old 09-25-2018, 04:09 PM
Aspencreek Aspencreek is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NailsWI View Post
Why is it such a big "IF" they ever leak. Wouldn't the same be true for all water sources then?
No, PEX is different. It is a flexible water distribution system using "flexible" (to a point) piping, not a rigid pipe like PVC or copper. It also has this wonderful property that allows it to expand to almost double it's size when frozen solid with water inside and can also handle hi temp's and pressures. Most new homes around here are using it exclusively, the connectors and connections are foolproof, it is simpler to run and much more installation friendly. When we built our cabin I insisted upon it due to the fact that it is occupied generally only on the weekends, and didn't want frozen (subsequently broken)pipes during the winter to ruin a weekend or stuff. I had to have a plumber from Madison do the work because central WI plumbers had not used it and wanted to run PVC. When I did a demonstration by taking a 2' section of the pipe, filling it with water, capping both ends and freezing it solid and then asked the plumber to make it leak, did he come to my way of thinking. He beat it with a hammer, banged it against a tree, even rolled over it with his truck, no leak's. That frozen section was almost double is overall width of the pipe and as it thawed shrunk back to it's original size.

For anyone building a cabin, or redoing the plumbing in a dwelling that you are going to use part time or full time for that matter PEX is the way to go. My father would have put it in our family cabin had it been around at the time, 4 busted pipes in 4 years back when I was a kid due to the loss of electrical heat. He cured it by putting in a drain line and taking out the P traps and draining the toilet every fall. But that meant not using the cabin during the winter.
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  #34  
Old 09-25-2018, 04:30 PM
NailsWI NailsWI is offline
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Pex tubing certainly has significant advantages over other materials, but fool proof? Not hardly. Pin hole leaks although not common, do happen. Joints fail. If a freeze up occurs there is no way to thaw it using a thaw machine, opening walls then thawing using heat gun is the only option. All materials have advantages and disadvantages. Now back on topic, if a wood floor is ones choice I sure wouldn't let Chicken Little syndrome sway my decision. My wood floor is 20 years old and has endured numerous spills and shows zero signs of water damage.

FWIW, CPVC not PVC is the water distribution material commonly used nowadays and that stuff sucks.
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  #35  
Old 09-25-2018, 04:48 PM
Aspencreek Aspencreek is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NailsWI View Post
Pex tubing certainly has significant advantages over other materials, but fool proof? Not hardly. Pin hole leaks although not common, do happen. Joints fail. If a freeze up occurs there is no way to thaw it using a thaw machine, opening walls then thawing using heat gun is the only option. All materials have advantages and disadvantages. Now back on topic, if a wood floor is ones choice I sure wouldn't let Chicken Little syndrome sway my decision. My wood floor is 20 years old and has endured numerous spills and shows zero signs of water damage.

FWIW, CPVC not PVC is the water distribution material commonly used nowadays and that stuff sucks.
Nobody said foolproof, but way better alternative, Nice thing about Pex is it will hold in the case of a freeze, unlike CPVC or Copper and you can take the time to thaw it without major damage and an immediate time factor.
I'm glad your floor is working for you, I had an oak floor in my kitchen, after the 2 incidents I had to replace it after 12 yrs. Would I go back, nope! Call that Chicken Little if you want, I call it "fool me once" shame on you, "fool me twice" ............
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  #36  
Old 09-25-2018, 06:08 PM
NailsWI NailsWI is offline
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Re read your post, YOU said it was fool proof.
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  #37  
Old 09-25-2018, 06:17 PM
Aspencreek Aspencreek is offline
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Yes I did, I meant as foolproof as anything can be. But that is why I will not put hardwood in wet areas.

Correction noted.
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  #38  
Old 09-25-2018, 06:35 PM
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muskyman73 muskyman73 is offline
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Default Flooring

We did glazed Porcelain tiles in the entire house, big ones 24x24 inches. We are extremely happy. Makes cleaning easy, water will never be an issue, and we will never have to worry about expansion / contraction with weather. Makes the house look like a million bucks too !
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  #39  
Old 09-26-2018, 07:29 AM
Kyle Posterick Kyle Posterick is offline
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Interesting conversation, ill add my two cents.


Of the two options, I prefer and installed tile. Wood swells and puckers, laminate is has the same issues.


Tile is warm when its laid with a heat source. Pex, ditra heat, etc. The systems are mature and there is no reason not to use them. Tile also transmits heat much better than a wood floor will.


Tile is durable and will last a lifetime if laid correctly. I feel the biggest reason it isn't used more is the lack of quality installers and the initial cost with qualified installers.


Tile isn't waterproof, but the bed can be made waterproof with appropriate materials. Ditra, redguard, hydroban, etc.


Grout maintenance is a matter of choice. New epoxy grouts are lightyears ahead of old blends. There are additives that make grout cleaning a thing of the past. You can also simply color the grout dark, which will aid in lowering maintenance.


As a whole, menards and home depot are typically not the right choice for finding quality materials, especially mortar.
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  #40  
Old 09-26-2018, 08:13 AM
JDMN JDMN is offline
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We went with Hickory wood floors ourselves this spring when we built. I definitely understand the appeal of tile for wiping up spills and in the event a major water indecent happens might be less overall impact, but for us quite frankly we like the way the wood looks in our house and it flows into the family room area which we did in the same wood as well. One thing to consider is talking to a realtor friend if you have one and get a feel for how wood vs. tile might impact resale. Good luck, but we are very happy with Hickory so far!
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