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  #1  
Old 07-30-2016, 02:03 PM
Finquest Finquest is offline
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Default Lund Transom Replacement Materials

Great forum you have here! I've been lurking awhile gleaning tips about my 2002 Lund Pro-V 1775's rotten transom.

I've seen several threads on the subject. Using a composite replacement like Coosa Board comes up often. However, no one seems to mention any actual results or experience with using it on an aluminum boat. Some of those threads are many years old. Certainly by now someone on this forum has actually used a composite product for their aluminum boat's transom?

Does anyone have good information and/or experience with:

Coosa Board Bluewater 26?

Arjay 6011?

Seacast?

Thanks for the help.
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  #2  
Old 07-30-2016, 07:03 PM
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bridgeman bridgeman is offline
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2 - 3/4" sheets of marine plywood sealed with two coats of epoxy resin, done correctly it'll outlast you
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Old 07-30-2016, 10:07 PM
Maybe
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Originally Posted by bridgeman View Post
2 - 3/4" sheets of marine plywood sealed with two coats of epoxy resin, done correctly it'll outlast you
Maybe maybe not, I've fix a rotten transom on a Lund the unsealed top cap is a really poor design, water can get in but can't get out, zero air movement, wet wood = rot.
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Old 07-31-2016, 06:19 AM
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Shellback Shellback is offline
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2 - 3/4" sheets of marine plywood sealed with two coats of epoxy resin, done correctly it'll outlast you
I agree, proper epoxy coating and sealing all the holes, you should be good to go.
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Old 07-31-2016, 05:30 PM
Kevin23 Kevin23 is offline
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Originally Posted by Maybe View Post
Maybe maybe not, I've fix a rotten transom on a Lund the unsealed top cap is a really poor design, water can get in but can't get out, zero air movement, wet wood = rot.


Propperly sealed wood will not rot in a transom.


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Old 07-31-2016, 06:31 PM
lakedog lakedog is offline
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Originally Posted by Finquest View Post
Does anyone have good information and/or experience with:

Coosa Board Bluewater 26?

Arjay 6011?

Seacast?

Thanks for the help.
Having researched this topic myself pretty extensively I think you'll find that there aren't enough examples to reach a meaningful conclusion about the feasibility or long term performance. You might very well end up with stress cracks or other problems by changing the rigidity of the material. Done correctly, wood is probably your best option. As has been stated it should be epoxy coated marine grade w/ good sealant at the transom cap and all through hull fittings.

Hull truth or iboats are other forums you may wish to search. Good luck with whatever you decide.
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Old 07-31-2016, 07:22 PM
Finquest Finquest is offline
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Thanks for the responses.

We have actually finished the tear out phase of this project. About 40% of the wood was so rotten that it easily crumbled in your hand. We had to use a shop vac to get that rotten stuff out. On the "good side" of the board there is rot along most of the top, the scupper hole (the other scupper was in the crumbled port side), and quite a few of the through bolt holes.

You can understand why I am concerned about using wood in the rebuild after seeing that.

My fear is that it only takes a sealant failure in one little spot for water to get into these transoms. Once in, where is it going to go? The vast majority of the pad's surface area is covered tightly by aluminum. So the water is not going to evaporate very fast (if at all) and it will take a long time for it to work its way down into the bilge. Wood rot is inevitable in this scenario.

Everyone who mentions a wood replacement always seem to qualify their statement with, "properly sealed." With all of the hardware in this transom -- through bolts, scuppers, top cap screws, starboard mount for the transducer, etc. -- I just don't know if keeping everything perfectly sealed is practical. Sealants fail. Like I said above, it only takes one little spot to let water get behind the aluminum.

The bottom line is that, unless I am missing something, wood free is the better way to go.

Last edited by Finquest; 07-31-2016 at 07:28 PM. Reason: left a word out
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Old 07-31-2016, 07:30 PM
wellpastcold wellpastcold is offline
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I feel your pain and understand your concern going forward. IMHO you would be best to go with the wood and do the epoxy sealing yourself and to your satisfaction. On the sealant end of things, there are superior products to what was used in the past. That should be your focus and it seems like it will be. Good luck with your project.
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Old 07-31-2016, 07:43 PM
Finquest Finquest is offline
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Originally Posted by lakedog View Post
Having researched this topic myself pretty extensively I think you'll find that there aren't enough examples to reach a meaningful conclusion about the feasibility or long term performance. You might very well end up with stress cracks or other problems by changing the rigidity of the material. Done correctly, wood is probably your best option. As has been stated it should be epoxy coated marine grade w/ good sealant at the transom cap and all through hull fittings.

Hull truth or iboats are other forums you may wish to search. Good luck with whatever you decide.
I get what your are saying here. The coosa may not be strong enough. The Arjay and Seacast may be so rigid that they cause an excessive amount of the engine vibration to be transferred. This can cause unusual metal fatigue and lead to a number of issues.

I've seen a lot of stuff about all 3 products on Hull Truth and Iboats. However, nearly all of those discussions have been about fiberglass boats. Metal fatigue is not much of a concern for them.
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Old 07-31-2016, 07:53 PM
Finquest Finquest is offline
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Originally Posted by wellpastcold View Post
I feel your pain and understand your concern going forward. IMHO you would be best to go with the wood and do the epoxy sealing yourself and to your satisfaction. On the sealant end of things, there are superior products to what was used in the past. That should be your focus and it seems like it will be. Good luck with your project.
Doesn't Lund start out with an epoxy sealed wood?

I am confident that I will seal the outside better that Lund did, but things change over time.
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