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  #1  
Old 11-11-2019, 12:14 PM
Tilzbow Tilzbow is offline
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Default Hydraulic Jack Plate Advice

I ordered my new Ranger 621 CFS with a Bobís Hydraulic Jack Plate. Boat is at the dealer getting prepped and I could have it on the water as soon as Sunday . Itís coming with a 400 vRod and a Bobís Hydraulic. I think I understand the basics of using a hydraulic jack plate including:

1) Raising motor for shallow water operation, docking and loading.
2) Lowering the motor during rough conditions to bury the prop, get the keel down and improve handling.
3) Determining optimal height for performance during running by first adjusting the jack plate and then adjusting the motorís trim.
4) Being aware of the engineís water pressure and temperature when raising the motor.

Anything Iím missing or any other advice or tricks?

Thanks!
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  #2  
Old 11-11-2019, 03:13 PM
welll
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Lower the motor for better hole shot
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  #3  
Old 11-13-2019, 02:16 PM
REW REW is offline
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Tilz,

When you are running at a given engine rpm, you want to both tweak the motor height and the motor trim for its optimum performance, best speed and overall best handling.

For example, at one engine rpm and water wave condition, you may want to run the motor at one depth. But, on a different day with different winds, you might want to have the motor - either moved higher or lower to optimize your setup.

That is the wonderful trait of a jack plate. No matter the wind and water conditions, and the engine rpm, you have the tools to optimize every parameter of the motor and its settings at any given time and any given boat speed and or engine rpm.

You will generally find that for a given set of wind and waves, you will learn the optimum engine height. You will also find and remember the optimum engine height for other wind and water conditions from a perfectly flat sea to seas running huge waves.

Be safe
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  #4  
Old 11-13-2019, 05:44 PM
clawman clawman is offline
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Tilzbow;
I have a 621 Ranger with 350 Verado and the same plate as you. I installed the plate in about May so have been using it all summer. Most of my use has been with just me in the boat. I generally have it on the #4 according to the foil strip on the plate. I've tried many different configurations and there is a little difference between all of the way up on #6 to full down but not much and I get a couple extra miles per hour motor fully elevated and fully trimmed out.

No you're not missing anything, just don't get your expectations up too much. You'll have to LOOK for the details.
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  #5  
Old 11-17-2019, 08:29 PM
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From all I have read as I was considering a jackplate on a Walleye boat about the only thing they are good for is running shallower water. Walleye boats are to heavy and hull design is not set up like bassboats that have a pad , that is where a jackplate can shine.
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  #6  
Old 11-18-2019, 06:17 AM
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marksjigs1 marksjigs1 is offline
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tilzbow
I've got a skeeter WX2060 with a hydro jack plate and this past spring I put trim tabs on it. I get much more out of the tabs than the jack plate.
both serve there purpose.
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  #7  
Old 11-18-2019, 07:58 AM
SLE SLE is offline
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I'm going to disagree a little, jack plates are another tool in the box, one I will have on any higher HP multi-speicies boat from here out. I run a Bobs Machine 6" plate paired with a 350 Verado. If you care about your boats performance and aren't a person willing to accept it as the dealer sets it up because often times you know more than your dealer, then there's not better tool.

benefits;

1.) Shallow water ability, navigating any shallow water, be it out fishing or loading the boat.
2.) helps performance bar none, both on the bottom end and top end. All the way down to all the way up is over 5 mph on my boat. Couple that with trim in/out. The speed difference is huge. If I have the plate all the way down and I'm trimmed in all the way versus the plate all the way up and trimmed out, there is 13-14 mph difference. Obviously the extreme on both ends but there's not doubt it works.
3.) Can dial in props in seconds. Every prop runs best a a different engine height. My worked Bravo, Tempest, and Rev 4 were all different.
4.) Can change Fuel Efficiency with a quick adjustment
5.) Additional set-back puts prop in cleaner water, cleans up transom area buy moving motor off of transom.
6) lowering or raising will affect the boat ride so you can lower it to gain a smoother ride in rough water. No it's not as drastic as trim tabs but it absolutely does help.
7) resale which is debatable however it was on my check list when boat shopping. Will it be a big selling factor on a 18.5' boat, probably not. Can it be a factor when your at the top of the walleye boat food chain, absolutely. It may or may not add to the price but if your cross shopping used boats and find two of the same for similar money, the one with the plate will have the edge. often times, you'll find the guys that skipped the jackplate have also trimmed costs in other areas when they ordered, be it on electronics or other options. The boats that have plates are usually more decked out. It's just the nature of the beast as jackplates aren't a necessity but once your at a certain price point the % of overall cost increase to add a plate gets pretty small.

Cons;

1.) your out a few more bucks
2)????? takes anther 6" or garage space?
3) I got nothin else....................................

There's way more pro's than con's. Bottom line, your ordering a Ranger 621, obviously this isn't about saving a buck. You ordered it with a 400 vrod, obviously performance is important otherwise the 300 V-8 would be hanging back there. There's not better way to dial in performance for a specific day and the ability to dial in props than a jackplate.
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  #8  
Old 11-18-2019, 08:43 AM
Waxy Waxy is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SLE View Post
I'm going to disagree a little, jack plates are another tool in the box, one I will have on any higher HP multi-speicies boat from here out. I run a Bobs Machine 6" plate paired with a 350 Verado. If you care about your boats performance and aren't a person willing to accept it as the dealer sets it up because often times you know more than your dealer, then there's not better tool.

benefits;

1.) Shallow water ability, navigating any shallow water, be it out fishing or loading the boat.
2.) helps performance bar none, both on the bottom end and top end. All the way down to all the way up is over 5 mph on my boat. Couple that with trim in/out. The speed difference is huge. If I have the plate all the way down and I'm trimmed in all the way versus the plate all the way up and trimmed out, there is 13-14 mph difference. Obviously the extreme on both ends but there's not doubt it works.
3.) Can dial in props in seconds. Every prop runs best a a different engine height. My worked Bravo, Tempest, and Rev 4 were all different.
4.) Can change Fuel Efficiency with a quick adjustment
5.) Additional set-back puts prop in cleaner water, cleans up transom area buy moving motor off of transom.
6) lowering or raising will affect the boat ride so you can lower it to gain a smoother ride in rough water. No it's not as drastic as trim tabs but it absolutely does help.
7) resale which is debatable however it was on my check list when boat shopping. Will it be a big selling factor on a 18.5' boat, probably not. Can it be a factor when your at the top of the walleye boat food chain, absolutely. It may or may not add to the price but if your cross shopping used boats and find two of the same for similar money, the one with the plate will have the edge. often times, you'll find the guys that skipped the jackplate have also trimmed costs in other areas when they ordered, be it on electronics or other options. The boats that have plates are usually more decked out. It's just the nature of the beast as jackplates aren't a necessity but once your at a certain price point the % of overall cost increase to add a plate gets pretty small.

Cons;

1.) your out a few more bucks
2)????? takes anther 6" or garage space?
3) I got nothin else....................................

There's way more pro's than con's. Bottom line, your ordering a Ranger 621, obviously this isn't about saving a buck. You ordered it with a 400 vrod, obviously performance is important otherwise the 300 V-8 would be hanging back there. There's not better way to dial in performance for a specific day and the ability to dial in props than a jackplate.
THIS^^^. Great post.

The other major Pro I would add is the ability to fine tune outboard height to eliminate a porpoise. It doesn't matter what brand or size boat you have, incorrect motor height can (and will) cause a porpoise at certain speeds. It can be too high (perfect at WOT) or too low (perfect for low speeds in rough water), both will cause problems at cruising speeds on calm water. A power jackplate allows you to fine tune your motor height for your current speed in seconds, and will eliminate or drastically reduce any porpoise you're getting at that speed.

Getting everything fine tuned is a combination of height and trim, they really go hand in hand.
You need trim for bow lift, but every HP you're using to lift the bow isn't pushing the boat forward, there's a sweet spot. The higher the motor, the less drag (every inch of gearcase in the water creates a crazy amount drag force), but you also need to have enough prop in the water to get full grip and allow enough trim angle to lift the bow without it blowing out, and you need that prop and gearcase in the water for boat control. It takes some time and some trial and error to get it figured out for each boat and each prop, but IMHO, it's well worth the time, effort, and cost.

I run the PowrTran Extreme plate, 4" setback, and I wouldn't be without it. The best part for me is I don't have to live with a compromise if I don't want to, I can always have max performance. I'm kinda surprised at the comments here that people don't see much difference running a plate. From full down to full up is a DRASTIC difference in my boat. There's no way you wouldn't notice it as the plate goes up and down. The subtle details of using the jack plate to fine tune the ride for the prop and the conditions might go unnoticed by those not in the know, they just think your boat rides and runs really well, but if you're a boat person and appreciate performance, you'll notice it immediately, and you'll want a power jack plate too lol.

Waxy
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  #9  
Old 11-18-2019, 04:39 PM
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TomP. TomP. is offline
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Talking to a few dealers and friends if the boat is properly set up to begin with right height and prop max you may see 2 MPH increase every one of them say the biggest reason on a Walleye boat is being able to run in shallower water. There is the advantage as mentioned in rough water being able to drop the motor but to the average Walleye guy it`s know where near a deal breaker.
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  #10  
Old 11-18-2019, 04:55 PM
SLE SLE is offline
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So you can take advise from a guy that’s “read about them” and “talked to his dealer about them”...........or take a hard look at what the people that own them have to say. Just saying........

So riddle me this, how are going to know the right prop and engine height on day one? A bravo, tempest and Rev 4 all perform differently. None of them are wrong, each has its own strength and each requires a different engine height. Each person is different and might want one over the other. Are you gonna unbolt and reinstall the engine several times to find the best “compromise” after dropping a hundred K on a boat, or go with a plate and be able to adjust to the weather, load, and prop in seconds?

Does this not seem a little silly when your talking about 1% of the overall cost on a top tier multi-spiecies boat?
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