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Old 03-24-2019, 09:53 PM
ColumbiaR ColumbiaR is offline
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Default Spinning Reel Reliability

When I was younger, before the big movement toward lighter and lighter reels, the conventional thinking seemed to be that a metal body was the way to go for quality and long term reliability. It was the less expensive reels that would have plastic or composite bodies. Now I see that many of the reels in the $170-250 price range have composite bodies which I’m sure helps reduce weight. I’m thinking of the Daiwa Tatula and the Shimano Stradic C4 reels. The quantum smoke has retained the metal body although it is a bit heavier. I know there are a lot of Daiwa and Shimano fans on this board and just wondering how these composite bodies hold up over time.
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Old 03-25-2019, 08:53 AM
Moff Moff is offline
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They hold up really really well. The big BUT is if you need something for heavy stress loads they make stronger frame alternatives. Shimano makes the aluminum Stradic FK. Daiwa offers the BG on the lower end and then you get the Certate on the higher end. Any northern/midwest walleye or smallmouth and some light duty pike fishing the Stradic CI4 and the Tatula/Ballistic hold up really well. Needing a stronger frame for pike, catfish, trout, etc use the stronger ones.
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Old 03-25-2019, 09:29 AM
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ECIRandy ECIRandy is offline
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Last fall while bass fishing I caught my largest musky using all bass gear (8 lb Berkley Nanofil and a Shimano Stradic FJ on a St. Croix 6'6" MH Avid rod). I was surprised at how well my gear worked. Thank God that I hooked him just right and he didn't cut my line (no leader).
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Old 03-25-2019, 12:02 PM
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BreezyPoint BreezyPoint is offline
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I donít worry too much about plastic frames...itís the gears that count and I really want metal gears. They last a lifetime like my old Swedish made Ambassaduers.


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Old 03-25-2019, 12:36 PM
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Bobby Winds Bobby Winds is online now
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It's IMHO that you don't need to spend anywhere near $170 for a good spinning reel......the very most I ever paid has been $79 and have many $49 and $59 reals that have produced and been flawless for YEARS.

It's your money, but if you think you're going to catch more fish because you spent $179 or more on a reel, then you are only fooling yourself and not the fish.

I only look for 5 or more ball bearing in the reel before giving it a second look and of course less the $80........
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Old 03-25-2019, 01:57 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobby Winds View Post
It's IMHO that you don't need to spend anywhere near $170 for a good spinning reel......the very most I ever paid has been $79 and have many $49 and $59 reals that have produced and been flawless for YEARS.

It's your money, but if you think you're going to catch more fish because you spent $179 or more on a reel, then you are only fooling yourself and not the fish.

I only look for 5 or more ball bearing in the reel before giving it a second look and of course less the $80........
More fish are lost due to dull hooks, bad line and not so good knots etc... than fish lost to inexpensive reels....but....I sure like some of my higher end gear, for the setups I use them for...they are perfect. I'm not out to impress or compete, I get what I want for the purpose I feel they work perfectly for...heck, I use Shimano Siennas for my ice combos & they work great! Some may not catch more fish with higher end gear....it's possible they may land more fish with higher end gear though!!?? But yeah...the fish don't care!

To answer the op...the "plastics" they use on the lighter higher end reels today, are much stronger than the plastics of yesteryear...I have the aluminum framed Shimano fk and the ci4 & ci4+ reels (did I mention I have Daiwa BGs also) and yes the aluminum framed reels are stronger, but you would need to have a pretty large fish with the drag locked down to notice the flex in e.g. the ci4+...I keep my drag set perfectly with enough tension to wear the fish out but not too much to the point of line breakage or rod snapping levels...Having your drag set or adjusting it correctly on the fly (if need be) will take stress off of everything! The only thing I can't do with my Stradic fk is backreel...oh...that's right, I never backreel anyway (don't need to, the drags are silky smooth). I think a large part of durability issues, come down to how well you take care of your gear...anything can last, if you treat it with care or anything can be busted up if you toss it around or handle it carelessly (I take care of my gear, and it is still performing flawlessly year after year).
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Old 03-25-2019, 03:53 PM
Anonymouse Anonymouse is offline
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Metal wears out too.
Anonymouse always took excellent care of spinning reels, taking them apart cleaning, and liberally re-coating the metal inner gear workings with petroleum jelly, several times per season.
Of course Anonymouse IS harder on reels than most fishermen, subjecting them to immersion quite often while wading - and sand is inevitable with the way Anonymouse bank fishes at times on the Wisconsin River and other locations. (Forked stick for a bank rod holder.)

Point here being, back in the 80s & 90s Anonymouse had a few Pfluegers and Shakespeares wear out in the crank hole of the body, even though they were waterproofed and had metal "O" bearings to carry the crank handle and through-rod (screw cap on the other side).
The fine grit sand eventually just wore away at the metal & the handles got wobbly due to hole wear enlargement.

Most fishermen probably won't ever have that happen, and Anonymouse still owns at least 1 Pflueger .035 from those days that is working just as well as it did when new.
But, metal isn't necessarily impervious to wear and failure any more than modern composites are.
It may be that composites actually are superior in this particular instance.
They are incredible hard materials, able to stand up to YEARS of abrasion, shock, and mishandling.

Don't get Anonymouse started on what happened to an Abu Garcia 6500C baitcasting reel spool when he used it to fly kites one spring.


Last edited by Anonymouse; 03-25-2019 at 04:01 PM.
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Old 03-25-2019, 05:59 PM
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What I find of the higher priced spinning reels is how smoother the drag works compared to some of the lower price models, even that is closer then it was 20 years ago. A 10# walleye on 6# test with a bad jerky drag in strong current things may not work out well. Before the advent of better drags I never used the drag I would click off the anti back reel switch and back reel way more control then drags of yesteryear. I still find my self doing this on big fish.
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Old 03-25-2019, 07:01 PM
Wrktfsh Wrktfsh is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TomP. View Post
What I find of the higher priced spinning reels is how smoother the drag works compared to some of the lower price models, even that is closer then it was 20 years ago. A 10# walleye on 6# test with a bad jerky drag in strong current things may not work out well. Before the advent of better drags I never used the drag I would click off the anti back reel switch and back reel way more control then drags of yesteryear. I still find my self doing this on big fish.
It might be counter intuitive to some but all my drags get greased. A very light thin coat. Helps smoothness a lot. Walleye reels on up to 50 sized reels I use for yellowfin all get it
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