Home   |  Message Board   |  Information   |  Classifieds   |  Features   |  Video  |  Boat Reviews  |  Boat DIY
Unknown bearing grease - Walleye Message Central
Walleye Message Central

Go Back   Walleye Message Central > Boats, Motors, Electronics and Trailers > Trailers and Tow Vehicles

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 07-08-2019, 06:20 PM
HodakaD HodakaD is offline
Minnow
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: .
Posts: 67
Default Unknown bearing grease

I just bought a boat and am heading to Canada in three days. I pulled it 600 miles home from where I bought it and the bearings ran cool the whole way. I would like to give the bearings a shot or two of grease, but don't know what kind of grease is in the hub. It is a bluish color. I know color doesn't mean a whole lot, but it's there any great that I can put in the hub to supplement what's already in there that won't have an adverse reaction? I don't have time to take the hubs apart with my work schedule before I go. Any advice would be appreciated.
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
  #2  
Old 07-08-2019, 07:01 PM
Custom Eyes Custom Eyes is online now
Wallhanger
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: NE Michigan
Posts: 6,809
Default

No way to tell what it is without analyzing equipment. If you can see that there's grease in the hub, it's still blue, and ran cool, I wouldn't even worry about it until you have time to flush and fill properly. You could do more harm than good by destabilizing what's in there already. It really doesn't take much grease for a hub bearing to operate safely.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 07-08-2019, 07:22 PM
HodakaD HodakaD is offline
Minnow
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: .
Posts: 67
Default

This is exactly what I wanted to hear. I've been reading you opinions on grease and plan to repack my hubs work the Lubramatic Marine grease you recommended in another thread. Thanks.
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
  #4  
Old 07-09-2019, 12:24 AM
REW REW is online now
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Nov 1999
Location: .
Posts: 36,250
Default

Often the greases that are labeled marine grease are blue in color.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 07-09-2019, 08:20 PM
Custom Eyes Custom Eyes is online now
Wallhanger
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: NE Michigan
Posts: 6,809
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by REW View Post
Often the greases that are labeled marine grease are blue in color.
True. Most are blue or green, but I do recall at least one marine grease being red. Can't recall the name off hand. Some tacky lithium grease. Color still doesn't tell you what the thickener or base oil type is though. I've seen calcium sulfonate, lithium, lithium complex, aluminum complex, and even clay/bentone thickener systems used in marine grease, and on top of it, in both conventional and synthetic base oils.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 07-10-2019, 07:57 AM
HodakaD HodakaD is offline
Minnow
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: .
Posts: 67
Default

Customeyes, What is your opinion of Lucas red n tacky as a boat trailer grease? I used that on my previous boat trailer.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 07-10-2019, 10:05 AM
Custom Eyes Custom Eyes is online now
Wallhanger
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: NE Michigan
Posts: 6,809
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by HodakaD View Post
Customeyes, What is your opinion of Lucas red n tacky as a boat trailer grease? I used that on my previous boat trailer.
Myself, I would go with a calcium sulfonate, but there's nothing wrong with Red n Tacky. Just a different technology to get water resistance and corrosion protection. Calcium sulfonates like Lubrimatic are inherently water and corrosion resistant with no additives needed. Red n Tacky is a lithium complex loaded up with additives and polymers to accomplish nearly the same. Where the calcium sulfonate will excel is in a case of a failed seal and heavy water intrusion into the hub and bearing. It can handle allot more water than the lithium and still provide protection.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 07-11-2019, 11:06 AM
Eric_CO's Avatar
Eric_CO Eric_CO is offline
Wallhanger
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Colorado
Posts: 892
Default

I second leaving it alone. Even if they aren't perfect you should be fine.

Unknowingly one season I ran a bearing with water in it for thousands of miles. It was the blue type of grease. Opened the hub, water ran out but the grease was fine and sticking to the metal parts.
__________________
Eric Ewing
LaSalle, CO
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 07-11-2019, 06:26 PM
Clairebear's Avatar
Clairebear Clairebear is offline
Keeper
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: South West Ontario
Posts: 383
Default

Single axle or tandem? The choice would be simple for me. Pull all wheels and replace bearings and seals. Likely takes less than 1 hour per wheel. Peace of mind.
Cheers and have a good trip.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 07-11-2019, 09:45 PM
HodakaD HodakaD is offline
Minnow
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: .
Posts: 67
Default

It's a single axle trailer. I pulled it from Chamberlain South Dakota, where I bought it, to northern Wisconsin, and it was fine. It has bearing buddies and there is grease in them. Yes, ideally I would have pulled both hubs apart and inspected everything, but I don't have the time. I have a spare bearing and the necessary tools to replace if need be on the way to Canada. Hopefully that won't happen. Thanks for all the input.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 06:42 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.