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  #1  
Old 05-05-2021, 08:13 PM
walleye571 walleye571 is offline
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Default Leaky rivets

What do you do with your leaky rivets?
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  #2  
Old 05-05-2021, 08:27 PM
C&K C&K is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by walleye571 View Post
What do you do with your leaky rivets?
Drill 'em out and replace 'em. The reason they start to leak is because they came loose. And the reason they come loose is because of corrosion on the shank of the rivet. Aluminum has its own protective film (aluminum oxide) that prevents corrosion. But when two pieces of aluminum work against one another it runs thru the oxide and into the fresh aluminum and it corrodes.

So the only real repair is to center punch and drill the rivet, buck new ones and then paint the repair area with zinc chromate prior to your top coat (if it's painted). If it's bare aluminum where the repair is made, just leave it and let it develop its natural oxide coating.
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Old 05-06-2021, 06:25 AM
jfaisten jfaisten is offline
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That's good advice from C&K -- I looked into this a couple years ago and found several how to videos on YouTube.
Good luck
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  #4  
Old 05-06-2021, 08:52 AM
REW REW is offline
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Walleye,
In addition:

You may have a design or structural issue going on.

If you find that you have a particular area of your boat that has a series of loose rivets in a particular area - that area may need some reinforcement.

Loose rivets are normally caused by the rough life that they may lead. i.e. with the working of the hull and the pounding of the waves - in an area of the boat that may be a bit light on reinforcement you may have any area of your hull that is flexing as a result of working the water where you boat.

So, if you indeed find that you have a particular area of your boat that has number of loose rivets, consider drilling out all of the rivets in the area, and manufacturing stiffening plates or braces and then using longer rivets when you reassemble your boat - put the boat back together with the addition of the additional bracing. Also, in cases like this, it is not a bad idea to put sealant in between the current hull and the brace parts to avoid any sort of leakage after the repair.

Best wishes.
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Old 05-06-2021, 09:05 AM
C&K C&K is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by REW View Post
Walleye,
Also, in cases like this, it is not a bad idea to put sealant in between the current hull and the brace parts to avoid any sort of leakage after the repair.
Yep, after working on airplanes for years, aluminum boat repairs come as second nature. When ever I replace hull sheets or install bracing I bed the the two pieces with Marine-Tex to prevent aluminum to aluminum contact. Buck new rivets and it's a permanent repair.

The boats are normally built at least cost to a price point. Not necessarily the top-of-the-line assembly methods which would make the boat so expensive nobody would buy it.
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Old 05-06-2021, 03:01 PM
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T Mac T Mac is online now
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If you can get at them.... First step would be to tighten the rivet up. Takes two guys.. one taps lightly, a couple of times on one end ..while the other guy bucks on the other end of said rivet.

Worst case.. drill the rivet out and replace. One guy taps.... one guy bucks.


If you can't get at the rivet to perform the above procedure.. There are closed end, (sealed) rivets that can be used.
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Old 05-06-2021, 03:36 PM
Marty59 Marty59 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by T Mac View Post
If you can get at them.... First step would be to tighten the rivet up. Takes two guys.. one taps lightly, a couple of times on one end ..while the other guy bucks on the other end of said rivet.

Worst case.. drill the rivet out and replace. One guy taps.... one guy bucks.


If you can't get at the rivet to perform the above procedure.. There are closed end, (sealed) rivets that can be used.
An "F" drill bit and 1/4 closed end rivet does a great job. Only suggestion is get the closed aluminum rivet with a steel mandrel. They pulled the metal together better than the aluminum mandrel.

https://www.rivetsonline.com/blind-r...blind-rivets#1


Marty
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Old 05-06-2021, 07:08 PM
C&K C&K is offline
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Actually, do NOT use pop rivets anywhere on the hull. They are ok to rivet your deck hatch hinge to a bulkhead, but that's about all they're good for and they come loose with time even in that application.



I've never seen anybody beat (or tap) on aluminum rivets with a hammer, unless they don't know what they are doing. That's an excellent way to over-flatten or split the shop head by not striking it square.

You set aluminum rivets with a 3 or 5 lb bucking bar (depending on the size of the rivet) on the tail end and a air hammer with a rivet bit on the head end. It's important that the rivet bit fits the head of the rivet. When setting a rivet the shank is loose in the hole by a few thousandths, it has to expand (from compression against the bucking bar) to completely fill the hole and the finished buck tail (or shop head) must be 1.5x the diameter of the shank.
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Old 05-06-2021, 07:46 PM
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Trade it in to a dealer who sells what ever brand you have.
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Old 05-07-2021, 07:19 AM
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As Tmac noted the blind ,sealed, aluminum rivet works well. I used these on my Lund Barons hull and they worked perfectly no leaks. I did add 5200 to the rivets stem for added insurance. If I could have used buck rivets I would have but i wasn't tearing up my floor and removing foam for 4 rivets. The aluminum blind rivets made it an easy,effective fix.
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