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  #31  
Old 09-09-2021, 09:23 PM
EasternWashingtonBoater EasternWashingtonBoater is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jethro View Post
OK, but the original poster has said he's not a gamer, and what makes a fast gaming pc is not needed for a fast "surf the internet and run Quicken" pc.

A person doesn't need a high end gpu to have a fast non gaming pc, what makes a pc good for flight simulator is a total waste of money for a non gamer. He has no reason to spend $3000 on a pc when he won't be able to tell the difference between that and a $1000 pc for his use.
You're absolutely correct, but I'm pointing out an avenue that until now hasn't been available - you can with an investment really fly around! Flight Simulator really isn't even a game, it's just that - flying airplanes through atmosphere at real-time rates. (8 hour flights, etc.) And everyone can share the same space - planes to avoid!

Myself, I use an old 2012 Mac Mini - it's adequate for office needs. But this new flight simulator is another level. There is absolutely nothing else like it, and I want to play with it myself.

Check out this - these guys flew around Ida (the hurricane) using real time meteorological information:

https://www.pcgamer.com/players-use-...-in-real-time/
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  #32  
Old 09-11-2021, 06:44 AM
Jethro Jethro is offline
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Well, technically MS Flight Sim is a game, and I can agree it probably run best on a high end pc.

If you want to see something really amazing in the gaming world you should try VR on a high end PC. Very different to feel like you are inside the game world.
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  #33  
Old 09-11-2021, 09:21 AM
REW REW is offline
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Mike,
If you are not computer literate, take your current computer to the Geek Squad or someone similar.

Have them remove the hard drive.

Have them replace the hard drive with a 1 TByte SSD.

Have them load a new copy of Win 10 on the new SSD, and any other necessary data including anti virus software - and or necessary programs from your current hard drive.

Note: Be sure to have the Geek Squad, to be sure to remove any trojans, or viruses - from your current hard drive before moving any data off the drive. You don't want to corrupt your new system.

Go home and enjoy your system.


You aren't a gamer, you indicate that you don't have any huge files. You don't either need, nor want a super fast highly sophisticated computer.

Enjoy.
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  #34  
Old 09-11-2021, 09:31 AM
Johnboy Johnboy is offline
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Location: The sorry State of Illinois
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Your hard-drive can be cloned onto a new SSD drive. I have done it several times.
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  #35  
Old 09-16-2021, 08:05 PM
Anonymouse Anonymouse is offline
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Gunna repeat this one more time because apparently some of you didn't get it the 1st time.

Your OS puts a LOT of work on the drive it's installed to - it should, it's constantly calling up whatever is needed to do whatever you need done.
BECAUSE your OS drive is the hardest working drive in your computer, it is the MOST LIKELY drive to fail first.

IF yer OS drive goes out - and they can go quickly sometimes, though usually there are noticeable events like; failing to write to the drive when you try to save something, grinding noises when it spins up, rumble noises, sudden failures of a program and/or BSD crashes more frequently, etc. - then EVERYTHING on that drive will be lost as well.
It is expensive to recover anything from a broken HDD drive and nearly impossible to recover anything usable from a broken SSD drive.

Ergo, IF you use an SSD for your OS drive, minimize any potential losses by ONLY using it for your OS - save EVERYTHING else to a separate HDD.
(Not really much point in using an SSD for a storage drive anyway because the nanosecond vs millisecond 1,000X faster cache burst isn't really as noticeable when retrieving stored items as it is when calling up processes for your OS that need to be run at thousands of flops per second.)

Think of it this way;
You don't put your daily tableware in an offsite storage unit because it would take forever just to set the table for supper every day. You keep it close at hand. That's what SSD drives do on a timescale 3,072X faster than a HDD (7 ns. vs 21 ms.).
But for boxes of old books you'll never look at anyway, or odd collectibles from your childhood that you are saving for the grand-kids - those SHOULD go to the offsite storage, because there's only so much space in yer home & you'll likely never look at them once in a decade.

If your house burns down, you'll lose the tableware - which you can replace easily enough, just like the OS - but at least yer keepsakes are still safe (on another off-Operating System storage drive).
If the offsite storage catches fire, it'll likely be someone else's unit & the odds are high your stuff will be safe, as long as the fire department arrives in time to put out the fire before it consumes all 600 storage units.
So it is with using an SSD for your OS AND storing everything you want to save on it as well. 1 fire will ruin your life. (An HDD mounted OS at least can potentially be mostly recovered if necessary.)

Earlier someone asked about using an SSD and cloud storage.
Personally, Anonymouse does not trust "The Cloud".
Whomever is operating "The Cloud" storage can see anything you put into it & we've all read over and over about hackers getting into Cloud storage and stealing the millions of passwords and personal data on millions of customers of Target, CVS, COstCo, Apple, UnitedHealth, Berkshire-Hathaway, and a whole lot more.

Here is Anonymouse's 1st rule of computing:
"If you put something on a computer, someday, somehow, somewhere, someone WILL get access to it."
It's as sure as Einsteinian physics - it's not, "will it happen?", it WILL!!! happen - it's just a matter of when.
If you put it into "The Cloud", it WILL happen that much sooner - because there is more incentive to target those installations and those who do that sort of thing are always ahead of the peeps in charge of preventing it.
Can someone hack YOUR computer?
Sure, but why bother?
There's little to zero incentive for those that can, to do so - risk vs reward just is not in favor of anything YOU have being useful to a hacker out to monetize his or her efforts.
Hacking is hard work - even to get through a simple router hardware firewall. It's not like it's portrayed on TV or in spy movies.
Peeps spend days, weeks, months, even YEARS, hacking into guarded sites.
Is your puny little $1,500 bi-weekly direct deposit check worth that kind of effort on the off-chance you actually MIGHT have put the banking password on your personal home computer?

In summary:
Use an SSD for your OS installation. It's very fast, much faster than a mechanical platter HDD, by 1,000X.
DO NOT store anything on your OS drive, other than your operating system and any programs you want to use with that OS.
Store EVERYTHING ELSE on a separate drive, be it an SD or HDD - but an SSD is serious overkill for a storage drive and if it does fail, it's irretrievably gone forever - unlike a mechanical failure (read/write arm) in a platter-type HDD. If you can still spin up an HDD, it's likely you can use a recovery program to retrieve most of whatever was on it, even if it's almost totally phuqued up.
Use "Cloud" storage with discretion. It simply is not very secure, no matter how many times the operators of said "Cloud" assure you they maintain the utmost security over it. There's ALWAYS a way in, using an "inside man" or 1 lazy employee who just won't/doesn't use the best password security.
ALWAYS use and maintain a top-line antivirus. There are several FREE ones that are every bit as good as the paid ones (Avast!, for example) and DO NOT click on linkys in yer email from peeps you are not pretty certain about - like the company you ordered something from or close personal friends who do NOT send you stupid linkys to click because THEY are internet idjuts.
Periodically blow off your internal computer parts to keep everything running cooler. Heat is the enemy. Always consider adding an extra fan if you can find room for it.
Regularly take the time to sort and file everything you've saved to a separate HDD.

Trust Anonymouse, the extra effort spent weekly, or even daily, pays big dividends when you have to go looking for it down the road and there's 3,000 files with really weird file names in the same "Saved To" folder.

Make a directory index with as many folders as you need categories to keep stuff where you can find it in a hurry and don't be afraid to make a separate folder AT THE TIME OF SAVING for each and every thingy you decide to put into long-term storage.
Below is a snapshot of one of Anonymouse's storage HDDs, for various programs and applications he uses or has used in the past.
There are 288,088 files in 41,047 folders (almost all of the folders have multiple sub-folders for each individual program version or collection of images) on that single drive & Anonymouse can find any one of them in 15 seconds or less.
Another drive has an image collection with over 68,000 separate images (categorized), and yet anther drive contains some 125,000 e-Book files (many in multiple formats) comprising a home library of over 29,000 volumes.
Peeps who've had a peek at this computer system have mentioned the phrase "Storage Whoore" on more than one occasion.
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Last edited by Anonymouse; 09-16-2021 at 08:47 PM.
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  #36  
Old 09-17-2021, 06:06 AM
mike41
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Posts: n/a
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Wow! Ananamouse,..
I believe I did I did "get" it the first time (most of it) But this expands it,..thank you .


Also the many other people that have contributed ,thank you all.
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  #37  
Old 09-17-2021, 07:29 AM
Yellowfin123 Yellowfin123 is offline
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Join Date: Mar 2019
Location: cali-NE of kansas city
Posts: 860
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Anonymouse View Post
Gunna repeat this one more time because apparently some of you didn't get it the 1st time.

Your OS puts a LOT of work on the drive it's installed to - it should, it's constantly calling up whatever is needed to do whatever you need done.
BECAUSE your OS drive is the hardest working drive in your computer, it is the MOST LIKELY drive to fail first.

IF yer OS drive goes out - and they can go quickly sometimes, though usually there are noticeable events like; failing to write to the drive when you try to save something, grinding noises when it spins up, rumble noises, sudden failures of a program and/or BSD crashes more frequently, etc. - then EVERYTHING on that drive will be lost as well.
It is expensive to recover anything from a broken HDD drive and nearly impossible to recover anything usable from a broken SSD drive.

Ergo, IF you use an SSD for your OS drive, minimize any potential losses by ONLY using it for your OS - save EVERYTHING else to a separate HDD.
(Not really much point in using an SSD for a storage drive anyway because the nanosecond vs millisecond 1,000X faster cache burst isn't really as noticeable when retrieving stored items as it is when calling up processes for your OS that need to be run at thousands of flops per second.)

Think of it this way;
You don't put your daily tableware in an offsite storage unit because it would take forever just to set the table for supper every day. You keep it close at hand. That's what SSD drives do on a timescale 3,072X faster than a HDD (7 ns. vs 21 ms.).
But for boxes of old books you'll never look at anyway, or odd collectibles from your childhood that you are saving for the grand-kids - those SHOULD go to the offsite storage, because there's only so much space in yer home & you'll likely never look at them once in a decade.

If your house burns down, you'll lose the tableware - which you can replace easily enough, just like the OS - but at least yer keepsakes are still safe (on another off-Operating System storage drive).
If the offsite storage catches fire, it'll likely be someone else's unit & the odds are high your stuff will be safe, as long as the fire department arrives in time to put out the fire before it consumes all 600 storage units.
So it is with using an SSD for your OS AND storing everything you want to save on it as well. 1 fire will ruin your life. (An HDD mounted OS at least can potentially be mostly recovered if necessary.)

Earlier someone asked about using an SSD and cloud storage.
Personally, Anonymouse does not trust "The Cloud".
Whomever is operating "The Cloud" storage can see anything you put into it & we've all read over and over about hackers getting into Cloud storage and stealing the millions of passwords and personal data on millions of customers of Target, CVS, COstCo, Apple, UnitedHealth, Berkshire-Hathaway, and a whole lot more.

Here is Anonymouse's 1st rule of computing:
"If you put something on a computer, someday, somehow, somewhere, someone WILL get access to it."
It's as sure as Einsteinian physics - it's not, "will it happen?", it WILL!!! happen - it's just a matter of when.
If you put it into "The Cloud", it WILL happen that much sooner - because there is more incentive to target those installations and those who do that sort of thing are always ahead of the peeps in charge of preventing it.
Can someone hack YOUR computer?
Sure, but why bother?
There's little to zero incentive for those that can, to do so - risk vs reward just is not in favor of anything YOU have being useful to a hacker out to monetize his or her efforts.
Hacking is hard work - even to get through a simple router hardware firewall. It's not like it's portrayed on TV or in spy movies.
Peeps spend days, weeks, months, even YEARS, hacking into guarded sites.
Is your puny little $1,500 bi-weekly direct deposit check worth that kind of effort on the off-chance you actually MIGHT have put the banking password on your personal home computer?

In summary:
Use an SSD for your OS installation. It's very fast, much faster than a mechanical platter HDD, by 1,000X.
DO NOT store anything on your OS drive, other than your operating system and any programs you want to use with that OS.
Store EVERYTHING ELSE on a separate drive, be it an SD or HDD - but an SSD is serious overkill for a storage drive and if it does fail, it's irretrievably gone forever - unlike a mechanical failure (read/write arm) in a platter-type HDD. If you can still spin up an HDD, it's likely you can use a recovery program to retrieve most of whatever was on it, even if it's almost totally phuqued up.
Use "Cloud" storage with discretion. It simply is not very secure, no matter how many times the operators of said "Cloud" assure you they maintain the utmost security over it. There's ALWAYS a way in, using an "inside man" or 1 lazy employee who just won't/doesn't use the best password security.
ALWAYS use and maintain a top-line antivirus. There are several FREE ones that are every bit as good as the paid ones (Avast!, for example) and DO NOT click on linkys in yer email from peeps you are not pretty certain about - like the company you ordered something from or close personal friends who do NOT send you stupid linkys to click because THEY are internet idjuts.
Periodically blow off your internal computer parts to keep everything running cooler. Heat is the enemy. Always consider adding an extra fan if you can find room for it.
Regularly take the time to sort and file everything you've saved to a separate HDD.

Trust Anonymouse, the extra effort spent weekly, or even daily, pays big dividends when you have to go looking for it down the road and there's 3,000 files with really weird file names in the same "Saved To" folder.

Make a directory index with as many folders as you need categories to keep stuff where you can find it in a hurry and don't be afraid to make a separate folder AT THE TIME OF SAVING for each and every thingy you decide to put into long-term storage.
Below is a snapshot of one of Anonymouse's storage HDDs, for various programs and applications he uses or has used in the past.
There are 288,088 files in 41,047 folders (almost all of the folders have multiple sub-folders for each individual program version or collection of images) on that single drive & Anonymouse can find any one of them in 15 seconds or less.
Another drive has an image collection with over 68,000 separate images (categorized), and yet anther drive contains some 125,000 e-Book files (many in multiple formats) comprising a home library of over 29,000 volumes.
Peeps who've had a peek at this computer system have mentioned the phrase "Storage Whoore" on more than one occasion.
1st my mower, now my computer... i've never been able look at my mower without cussing her a little
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  #38  
Old 09-17-2021, 06:54 PM
MarkG MarkG is offline
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Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: N. Illinois
Posts: 3,055
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fshrman-r72 View Post
Apple all the way, been there done that, got tired of Junk, virus, crash, made the switch and never looked back.

Apple users... Heads up. In case you are unaware...Changes coming which will likely compromise what you think is privacy. Having not drank the Apple Kool-Aid , I myself have no opinion on this, except to remind of the old saying .."The road to he11 is often paved with good intentions."

Read Up:
https://www.cnbc.com/2021/08/06/appl...w-changes.html

https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2021/0...r-private-life
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  #39  
Old 09-17-2021, 07:26 PM
mhouge mhouge is offline
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Join Date: Jun 2021
Posts: 38
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Anonymouse - I'm not sure a brain dump is the most helpful in this situation. Everything you said is technically correct...but an analogy: this fella is asking about an oil change, and you are telling him about every possible thing that needs maintenance on his car, barely touching on the oil-change question.
Friend, I understand what you're saying. But folks that just want to power up their PC to go to the walleye forum aren't looking for ways to extend their SSD hard drive.
As a software engineer, I've been running two SSD hard drives 24/7 on my main workstation for 8 years. They are RAID 0. Zero issues.
To think that a guy that boots up his computer to use the internet (and this site)? At most, a few MB will move through his SSD card storing cookies. More activity will happen on that drive with a Windows update.

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