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  #1  
Old 07-09-2019, 06:22 PM
fisher_i_am fisher_i_am is offline
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Default ranger weights

I always fret too much prior to our big trip to canada and fearful of over loading the trailer. I'm an engineer and have a spreadsheet for everything and when calculating the weight I have in the trailer I question the listing of boat weights on the ranger sites. My gut says something is off with the weights they post.

I know i should roll through a scale but never had a chance....

I have an 2017 ranger 1880.

Ranger web site listed length and weights below for various boats

Ranger 1880 = 2290lbs / 18' 10"
Ranger 2080 = 2400lbs / 20' 9"
Ranger 619 = 2275lbs / 19'10"
Ranger 620 = 2340lbs / 20' 7"
Ranger 621 = 2400lbs / 21' 10"

Skeeter MX1825 = 2075lbs / 18' 4"
Skeeter WX1910 = 2175lbs / 19' 1"
Skeeter WX2060 = 2750lb / 20'6"


I have a single axle trailer with a GVWR of 4500lbs. I calculate with everything in it I'm right at 4500lbs. This includes extra stuff I put in the boat for the trip including water, beer, camp supplies, ect... and all my fishing stuff motors, batteries, tools and gas. The trailer tires are rated at 2830lbs each.

My question is how does the same model of boat that's two feet longer only weight 110 lbs more. Perhaps this is accurate if you think the extra two feet could only be hull and flooring.... just seems odd to me. I guess comparing the 619 to 621 the difference is about the same.

The weight difference on a longer skeeter is striking and more of what I expected.

question.... has anyone rolled their 1880 on a scale?
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  #2  
Old 07-09-2019, 07:33 PM
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CI_Guy CI_Guy is online now
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Two things I've learned in my 65 years on this earth:
1) Every boat weighs more than the manufacturer's numbers online.
2) Every fully loaded boat and trailer leaving for a big trip weighs more than their owner estimates.
Make the time to take your boat to a truck stop with a scale or a local grain elevator with a full tank of gas, tackle boxes, all batteries and anchors and see how much it weighs before you start packing other gear.
In my experience (3 other boat owners and myself estimating the weight of our rigs then weighing them) you will be 4 to 6 hundred lbs. heavier than you think.
All 4 boats we weighed were 17' or 18' with a 115 to 150 hp motor on them.
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  #3  
Old 07-09-2019, 08:18 PM
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WallyWarrior WallyWarrior is online now
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Load it up and head down the road. If you’re close, you’ll be fine. If you need to shed a few extra pounds, leave the spare tire home (what’s life without risk).


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  #4  
Old 07-09-2019, 09:55 PM
REW REW is offline
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Fisher,

Since you have asked the question you already know the answer.

Take the empty boat with just the bare bones motor, fuel, trolling motor and minimum stored equipment in the rig to a highway or transfer station or dump scale and weigh the rig.

Then you will know the starting point.

Compare this empty weight to the rated load that of the trailer that is on the spec plate of the trailer.

Subtract 10% from the rated load of the trailer and you can then subtract the empty rate of the rig from that number and you will know exactly how much added weight that you can safely put into the rig for a trip.

But, to be safe, after fully loading the rig on the night before you take off, swing by a scale and weigh the rig. In most areas there are convenient scales to be found that will weigh loads. If in a rural area, check at a local grain elevator to weigh your rig on their scales. If in a metro area, just go to a transfer station or a dump that has a scale and use their scale.

At the end of the day, it makes no difference what is printed in a manufacturers literature with respect to weight. Just weigh the rig and you will be armed with that knowledge. Also, remember that over years of use, boats can absorb water from the hull itself or through rain and waves coming into the boat and getting absorbed into the flotation foam that will make the rig heavier. So, it is a good idea to weigh the rig once or twice a year, just to know the progress of weight build up on your rig. Yes, it will happen!!

Be safe
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  #5  
Old 07-10-2019, 08:35 AM
Dkrum Dkrum is offline
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Fisher- I have a 2017 1880 MS with a 36 volt Ulterra, I4 Verado and no kicker. I did weigh mine at a truck stop because I wanted to know too. Fully loaded with all of my fishing gear, anchor, ski plyon and a full tank of gas, it weighed 4600 lbs (4100 on the axle, 500 on the trailer tongue). So my advice to you is to make sure your tires are fully inflated and fill the boat up with gas when you get close to your destination. I have made a couple of long (8 hour) runs up to Vermilion from Milwaukee and the rig tows beautifully.

Last edited by Dkrum; 07-10-2019 at 08:40 AM.
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  #6  
Old 07-10-2019, 07:20 PM
fisher_i_am fisher_i_am is offline
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Thanks dkrum, very helpful
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Old 07-11-2019, 11:25 PM
REW REW is offline
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fisher,
If I may ask, is there any reason why you have not weighed your loaded rig in the past?

Every boat, every motor, every load is unique.

Weigh your own rig so that you know your own situation.

Best wishes.

p.s.
If I was to use a rule of thumb and that would be to take all of the manufacturers listed weight for everything and then add 1,000 lbs to get the actual weight of the loaded rig with a bit of a safety margin.
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Old 07-12-2019, 04:32 AM
fisher_i_am fisher_i_am is offline
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Never had a chance. I recognized in my original post it’s something I should do.

Was merely looking for someone with an 1880 that had.

Glad one person replied with the answer I was searching for.
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  #9  
Old 07-15-2019, 10:56 AM
jjy jjy is offline
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My 1880 weighed around 4200-4600lbs loaded. Heavy boat in my opinion for it's length.
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  #10  
Old 07-20-2019, 07:13 PM
fisher_i_am fisher_i_am is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jjy View Post
My 1880 weighed around 4200-4600lbs loaded. Heavy boat in my opinion for it's length.
Thanks.

I'll have to weigh it also.. but this is exactly what I was looking for until then.

I appreciate you answering my question - Thank you
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